October 30

Jon_image Hey, so, the Slacktivixen and I will be attending Jon Stewart's "Rally to Restore Sanity" on Oct. 30 on the National Mall in Washington.

Which means, of course, that we will also be attending Stephen Colbert's "March to Keep Fear Alive" on Oct. 30 on the National Mall in Washington.

In case you've missed the build-up on "The Daily Show," Stewart describes his rally this way:

We're looking for the people who think shouting is
annoying, counterproductive, and terrible for your throat; who feel that the loudest voices
shouldn't be the only ones that get heard; and who believe that the only time it's appropriate
to draw a Hitler mustache on someone is when that person is actually Hitler. Or Charlie Chaplin
in certain roles.

Are you one of those people? Excellent. Then we'd like you to join us in Washington, DC on October 30 –
a date of no significance whatsoever — at the Daily Show's "Rally to Restore Sanity." Ours is a rally for
the people who've been too busy to go to rallies, who actually have lives and families and jobs (or are
looking for jobs) — not so much the Silent Majority as the Busy Majority. If we had to sum up the
political view of our participants in a single sentence… we couldn't. That's sort of the point.

Stephen_image While Colbert, as usual, takes a different approach:

America, the Greatest Country God ever gave Man, was built on three bedrock principles: Freedom. Liberty.
And Fear — that someone might take our Freedom and Liberty. But now, there are dark, optimistic forces
trying to take away our Fear — forces with salt and pepper hair and way more Emmys than they need.
They want to replace our Fear with reason. But never forget — "Reason" is just one letter away from "Treason."
Coincidence? Reasonable people would say it is, but America can't afford to take that chance

But whether or not one shares either of those perspectives or neither of them, the bottom line is this: Free Show. And maybe, just maybe, as the 'vixen says, her fingers crossed, a chance to meet Wyatt Cenac.

I'm trying to figure out what to write on my sign for the rally. Leaning toward: "Actually, it's probably a bit more complicated than that." Or maybe, "Let's work together to see if we can identify precisely where we disagree."

But anyway we'll be there, is the point. And it's possible that some readers and posters on this blog will be there as well. And if you're there and we're there, we should probably introduce ourselves and arrange to share a beverage or something.

  • Art

    I might also add that this:
    (eg. old english us e of ‘f’ for ‘s’ in the original : “No man if an ifland unto himmfelfe” ..right?)
    is wildly incorrect. “Old English” did not use “f” instead of “s”. The “old” (not nearly as old as Old English, the language, which John Donne did not speak — he spoke Modern English, far more similar to how you or I speak than to the language of Beowulf) thing here is just an old *style of writing*.
    It’s not an “f”, it’s a “long s”. It looks a little like an “f” to us but it’s not an “f” and it would not have been understood by any of the people reading it at the time as an “f”, much less actually pronounced like an “f”. It’s just a way of writing an “s” that makes sense when you’re writing in cursive longhand, that eventually got phased out due to confusion with an “f” when it was translated into text from a printing press, but the fact that it’s hard to read for us today doesn’t actually make it a real spelling difference any more than the fact that Palmer-method cursive is getting harder to read today (because it’s no longer taught in many schools) means that words were “spelled differently” back then and that people used to say “2″ when they meant “Q”.

  • Amaryllis

    In any case, changing “man” to “person” is a semantic change far more momentous than simply changing the spelling to fit modern orthography. One is just changing the way something was transcribed from speech into writing (always an iffy process); one is actually changing the meaning of what is being said, and that’s presumptuous in the extreme, even if you think the change is a virtuous one or even if you’re convinced that you know that if John Donne lived in the present day that’s what he would have said.
    Well, one might simply be paraphrasing rather than quoting; I do it all the time (yes, I know I said I valued accurate quotations — do I contradict myself? very well, I contradict myself). Anyway, I think it’s pretty safe to say that Donne was speaking of humanity in general when he said “I am involved in mankind.” That phrasing was used long after Donne’s time– the textbooks for my anthropology classes back in the Dark Ages of the 1970′s all seemed to have titles like “Images of Man” and “Culture, Man and Nature,” and “The Science of Man” and “Man, Mind and Land,” and so on and so on, in a way that would be totally unacceptable today.
    So I don’t think it’s a stretch to think that a poet as sensitive to the language as Donne was, were he writing today, would have written that passage differently.
    So, um, “No man is an island” in quotation marks, but
    No Human Is An Island unquoted?
    (In a meeting at work a few days ago, a program manager was discussing an unpopular new standard to which we are being subjected, and he said that our management had made a “gentleman’s agreement” with our counterparts in another agency that we’d adhere to it. And before I could stop myself, I muttered, “I’m not a gentleman; I guess that lets me out.” Snickers ensued, but I don’t think I’ll get away with it.)
    …speaking of paraphrasing, or parody, or whatever would be the technical term: I know some of you also hang out at ObsidianWings. I am in its debt forever; I have read The .doc file of J. Alfred Prufrock.
    …and I got back from the Book Festival today with a trove of four books of poetry, five (5!) Wodehouse novels (three of which I hadn’t even read before), three other novels, two non-fiction books and a Rothko calendar for my daughter the artist. Excuse me while I go and read all night.

  • storiteller

    I live right near DC and work there, so I’ll definitely be there. I’d love to get together, although I’m mostly a lurker.

  • http://www.tvshowboards.com/stargate/ Erik Bloodaxe

    Pretty much. Honours are what you end up with a degree in. “Joint honours in French and History”, for example. Joint honours are less common, you’re right. But the key difference between the systems is that, if you are doing a degree in Politics, say, then Politics is all you’ll study for three years. (OK, you can do other classes in your own time, say a language course: but it won’t count towards your final degree, any more than playing sports would.) The US system seems to be set up to compel people to study some of everything, correct?

    This sounds a like how grad school works over here. In the undergrad years, you’re encouraged to take a variety of things to complete lib ed requirements that you can fulfill at any time. In the grad years, it can only be courses related to your field of study, at least to count toward your degree (as you described how honours work above).
    Where would an equivalent to grad school fit in, and what would it be called over there? Is it still just “university”, with no distinction made between what level of degree is being sought?

  • Lonespark

    OMFG that is genius! Thank you, Amaryllis, so much for sharing.
    “Do I dare disturb the intarweb?”

  • Dash

    Amaryllis: I got back from the Book Festival today with a trove of four books of poetry, five (5!) Wodehouse novels (three of which I hadn’t even read before), three other novels, two non-fiction books and a Rothko calendar for my daughter the artist. Excuse me while I go and read all night.
    I am engaging enthusiastically and without reservation in the Sin of Envy. (And thank you for the Prufrock parody.)

  • http://cereselle.livejournal.com cereselle

    @CaryB: I’m in Sanford! We’re right near each other!
    I’m pretty sure I can get the time off; I just don’t want to take too much, cause I’m trying to save it up for a long vacation next year.

  • Fraser

    Tonio: ”
    “Stewart made the false equivalency of pointing out Bush’s war crimes to Birtherism”
    And the people who make criticisms like that sound, to me, like children complaining “No fair!” They may or may not see the two as equivalent, but their goal seem to be to accuse critics of hypocrisy.

    I don’t see it as an accusation Stewart is a hypocrit, just that the two are not equal.
    PG Wodehouse rulez!

  • Tonio

    I don’t see it as an accusation Stewart is a hypocrit, just that the two are not equal.

    I wasn’t talking about the specific criticism of Stewart. I was describing a more general phenomenon, where conservatives respond to criticism directed at one of their own by offering examples of liberals who do the same thing, trying to prove that liberals are guilty of a double standard. I remember Aunursa doing that several times here.

  • MercuryBlue

    Swap ‘liberal’ and ‘conservative’ in that statement and I’ve done it myself. (Not here, though. And not often, because it usually isn’t worth the fight that’s guaranteed to start if I counter Mom’s complaints about the Obama deficit by reminding her that I never heard a word out of her about the Bush deficit.) Is there something wrong with that?

  • Amaryllis

    @lonespark, Dash: you’re welcome! Sheer brilliance, wasn’t it?
    “That was not what I typed at all.
    That was not it. OH LOL.”
    and….but the whole thing is one long quotable moment.
    —-
    From one of my book-fair books comes my new sign:
    “The good-natured need no cutlery
    In their vocabulary.”
    -Archilochos, 7 century BCE, tr. Guy Davenport

  • Tonio

    Is there something wrong with that?

    Only if you complain how the “media elite” or “intellectual elite” are biased against liberals. I’m not criticizing the deflection tactic but the righteous victim mentality of the conservatives who use the tactic.

  • P J Evans

    @ Art
    Those of us who met Fraktur in German language classes aren’t likely to make that mistake.
    Also I’ve seen long S in handwritten stuff into the late 19th century in the US (when it tends to get ‘Je?se’ misread as ‘Jepe’ because the transcriber didn’t know about it).

  • http://www.nicolejleboeuf.com/index.php Nicole J. LeBoeuf-Little

    More slogans:
    Here’s Your Sign.
    REMEMBER TUNNEL 17!

  • Flying sardines

    @ Steve Morrison | Sep 25, 2010 at 01:16 AM & Art | Sep 25, 2010 at 09:35 PM
    That wasn’t really the letter f, it was the so-called long s.
    Okay thanks.
    @ Art | Sep 25, 2010 at 09:31 PM :
    In any case, changing “man” to “person” is a semantic change far more momentous than simply changing the spelling to fit modern orthography. One is just changing the way something was transcribed from speech into writing (always an iffy process); one is actually changing the meaning of what is being said, and that’s presumptuous in the extreme, even if you think the change is a virtuous one or even if you’re convinced that you know that if John Donne lived in the present day that’s what he would have said.
    I take your point although its hard to know what was meant – I do feel Donne was referring to people there and not “men” specifically only so, yeah.
    I guess one way around that would be to either use the original quote in quotation marks or simply use the updated person version without quote marks and without citing Donne but then that feels like leaving out the source which I feel iffy about too. Hmmm ..

  • Flying sardines

    As I just see Amaryllis as already said.

  • http://www.nightkitchenseattle.com MadGastronomer

    Fs, try: Donne said that no one is an island.

  • Flying sardines

    Good idea, MadGastronomer, that works. :-)

  • Flying sardines

    If anyone’s interested (Wikiis my friend!) Donne’s original quote & context can be found here :
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meditation_XVII

  • Amaryllis

    @MadGastronomer: During my most recent round of browser problems, I lost the link to your new blog. Would you mind re-posting? Thanks!

  • http://www.nightkitchenseattle.com MadGastronomer

    Amaryllis: You mean this one here?

  • Amaryllis

    That’s the one, thank you.

  • http://www.agirlcalledraven.blogspot.com sarah

    @Amaryllis: That parody made my day (quite a thing to say on Monday morning). I once wrote a parody of part of East Coker for a class.
    @Raj: We share a birthday. Yay November babies.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com/ Ross

    I once looked up the lyrics of ‘To Anacreon in Heaven’ out of curiosity (For the uninitiated, it’s the drinking song whose tune was stolen when they decided that ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ worked better as a song than as a poem). The copy I found on the interwebs was, I am quite sure, the result of OCR run on a period source. It began “To Anacreon in Heaven where he fat in full glee”
    (I tried reading it a couple different ways, and let me tell you, the original words don’t fit the meter half of that piece of music half so well as Francis Scott Key’s)

  • ajay

    And before I could stop myself, I muttered, “I’m not a gentleman; I guess that lets me out.”
    It’s perfectly possible to be both a woman and a gentleman, Amaryllis. Unless you’re an aunt, of course.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aunts_Aren%27t_Gentlemen

  • Arynne

    Anybody driving down from (or through) New York?
    Do you pick up hitch-hikers? I’ve got my towel!

  • http://jamoche.livejournal.com Jamoche

    For people on Facebook who can’t make it in person: People Coming “In Spirit” to Restore Sanity/Keep Fear Alive Rally

  • Lori

    For anyone in the NYC area (or closer to NYC than DC), the Huffington Post is sponsoring free bus service to the Stewart/Colbert rally. You can get info about how to reserve a seat by going here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/09/28/sanity-bus-arianna-offers_n_742739.html

  • http://worldsandtime.blogspot.com/ Spherical Time

    I’ll be there. Already booked our hotel rooms, but I need to see about flights still.
    Looking very much forward to it.

  • Sean Mulligan

    I like Stewart and Colbert, but I disagree with the implication, that progressive protesters are equivalent to the Tea Party people on the right.

  • Peter

    I’ll be there! Once you’re there, post on your blog where you’ll be, and we can check it with your iPhones and find you.

  • Hibryd

    Brandi – Good news! There’s satellite rallies springing up in other major cities. I’m going to attend the San Francisco one myself. Sign-wise, I’m trying to decide between:
    “This sign has correct grammar and spelling.”
    and
    “I’m okay with paying taxes”

  • http://www.gyrofrog.com Gyrofrog

    “Down with metrics! We don’t want no foreign ruler”
    “Don’t ban miniskirts! Don’t skirt the issue”
    Cracked Magazine, circa 1981

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