Easter Saturday

(With the new site, I’m reposting this from last year.)

Nothing worth doing is completed in our lifetime; therefore, we are saved by hope. Nothing true or beautiful or good makes complete sense in any immediate context of history;? therefore, we are saved by faith.? Nothing we do, however virtuous, can be accomplished alone; therefore, we are saved by love.

– Reinhold Niebuhr

This is my favorite day in Holy Week, this Saturday, this unrestful Sabbath, my favorite day in the whole of the liturgical calendar.

Well, actually, “favorite” is the wrong word. It’s not that I like this day so much as that I understand it. It’s recognizable, familiar, lived-in.

This day, the Saturday that can’t know if there will ever be a Sunday, is the day we live in, you and I, today and every day for the whole of our lives. This is all we are given to know.

Easter Sunday? That’s tomorrow, the day after today. We’ll never get there in time. We can believe in Easter Sunday, but we can’t be sure. We can’t know for sure. We can’t know until we’re out of time.

Here, in time, there’s just this day, this dreadful Saturday of not knowing.

There are some things we can know on this Saturday. Jesus is dead, to begin with, dead and buried. He said the world was upside-down and needed a revolution to turn it right-way-round and so he was executed for disturbing the peace. He came and said love was greater than power, and so power killed him.

And now it’s Saturday and Jesus is dead and we’re all going to die and everything I’ve told you about him turns out to be in vain and everything I’ve staked my life on turns out to be in vain. Our faith is futile and we’re still hopeless in our sins. Jesus is dead and we are of all people most to be pitied.

That last paragraph is a paraphrase from St. Paul. What he actually says there, in his letter to the Christians in Corinth, is “if …” What he says, specifically, is:

If there is no resurrection of the dead, then Christ has not been raised; and if Christ has not been raised, then our proclamation has been in vain and your faith has been in vain. … If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. Then those also who have died in Christ have perished. If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead …

But that’s Sunday language and Sunday certainty and it doesn’t make much sense here on Saturday. Here on Saturday, we can hope it’s true and we may even try to believe it’s true, but we can’t know “in fact” one way or another. Not now. Not on Saturday.

And to be honest, it doesn’t seem terribly likely, because Saturday, this Saturday, is all we’ve ever known. Yesterday was this same Saturday, and so was the day before that, and the day before that, and the day before that.

Why should we expect that tomorrow will be any different?

Seriously, just look around. Does it look like the meek are inheriting the earth? Does it look like those who hunger and thirst for justice are being filled? Does it look like the merciful are being shown mercy?

Jesus was meek and merciful and hungry for justice and look where that got him. They killed him. We killed him. Power won.

That’s what this everyday Saturday shows us — power always wins. “If you want a picture of the future,” George Orwell wrote, “imagine a boot stomping on a human face — forever.”

“But in fact,” St. Paul says, everything changes on Sunday. Come Sunday power loses. Come Sunday, love wins, the meek shall inherit, the merciful will receive mercy and no one will ever go hungry for justice again. Come Sunday, everything changes.

If there ever is a Sunday.

And but so, this is why we hope for Sunday and why we live for the hope of Sunday. Even though we can’t know for sure that Sunday will ever come and even if Saturday is all we ever get to see.

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  • Sgt. Pepper’s Bleeding Heart

    Huh. This was my favourite of all things you wrote last year, so I found the link to the old post and emailed it to a bunch of friends today. .

    One of my friends tells me that Hans von Balthasar made Holy Saturday the centre of his theology. Something to look into when I have the brainpower.

    Thanks for posting it anew, Fred. It really is beautiful.

  • Linda

    Hi Fred,
    I love your blog. I have learned much from your wisdom! I originally found it as you had posted about a band that I love “eastmountainsouth’. I now work with both members, Peter Bradley Adams and Kat Maslich-Bode who are making music as solo artists.
    We have some great new music from them and I wanted you to hear some of it for free on our website (www.misharamusic.com). Just click on the ‘free songs’ link there. At Mishara we aim to be a home and a label that celebrates great music by special singer-songwriters including them, Colin Devlin, Barnaby Bright and others. Please enjoy and if so, care to share with your friends via social media. You can also buy the CDs directly from us so more of the hard-earned money goes directly to the writers. Thanks, Fred!
    Regards,
    Linda Baker
    Mishara Music

  • Linda

    Hi Fred,
    I love your blog. I have learned much from your wisdom! I originally found it as you had posted about a band that I love “eastmountainsouth’. I now work with both members, Peter Bradley Adams and Kat Maslich-Bode who are making music as solo artists.
    We have some great new music from them and I wanted you to hear some of it for free on our website (www.misharamusic.com). Just click on the ‘free songs’ link there. At Mishara we aim to be a home and a label that celebrates great music by special singer-songwriters including them, Colin Devlin, Barnaby Bright and others. Please enjoy and if so, care to share with your friends via social media. You can also buy the CDs directly from us so more of the hard-earned money goes directly to the writers. Thanks, Fred!
    Regards,
    Linda Baker
    Mishara Music

  • Emcee, cubed

    Let me just say, as a non-Christian, I love this post. Because Holy Saturday has always intrigued me. It’s the day, the only full day, that Christ was absent for the world. It should be a day of mourning, of despair, or at best, a day of the testing of one’s faith. But it is largely ignored. If Easter is the most important day in Christianity, I would think Holy Saturday should come in a close second. For as you say, this is the day when nothing is proven. Christ hasn’t yet risen, and yet one still needs to have faith that His teachings are still right and good and true. To believe this on and after Easter Sunday, when the proof is already there in front of you, is easy. But today, this is where the faithful are separated. Believing, when all circumstantial evidence seems to be to the contrary, this is the mark of true faith.

  • Anonymous

    I believe Screwtape explained it better than I do why it is neccesary to have easter saturday if you want to be a Christian.

    Now it may surprise you to learn that in His efforts to get permanent possession of a soul, He relies on the trough even more than on the peaks; some of His special favourites have gone through longer and deeper troughs than anyone else…It is during such trough periods, much more than during the peak periods, that it is growing into the sort of creature He wants it to be. Hence the prayer offered in the state of dryness are those which please Him best…Our cause is never more in danger than when a human, no longer desiring, but still intending, to do our Enemy’s will, looks round on a universe from which every trace of Him has vanished, and asks why he has been forsaken, and still obeys.

  • Anonymous

    Hume would love this. Christian empiricism. Or something. I love it too.

  • Lizzy L

    I also love this day, Fred, but for different reasons and a different experience. As a Catholic, I get to attend and participate tonight in the great Easter Vigil liturgy, which is my favorite liturgy in the whole year. It begins at sunset, outdoors, and then moves into a darkened church. It has candles, song, bells, baptisms, a huge light-filled celebration of the Risen Christ: it’s wonderful! Theologically, I appreciate your point, that the darkness before dawn is also holy, that Christ is our hope even when there is no hope. But I look forward all day to the night, when my church blazes with light as it anticipates and celebrates the dawn.

  • Anonymous

    If you don’t work like a dog to make the Saturdays all be better for everyone, Sunday doesn’t matter because you’re stuck with jam yesterday, jam tomorrow, but never jam today.

  • Anonymous

    Random note: after reading this and knowing that it it been posted earlier as well, I feel like a bit of a chode for musing in the comments section a month or so back that Fred was a theological liberal of the Spong, Borg, or Crossan variety.

  • http://jamoche.dreamwidth.org/ Jamoche

    That’s what this everyday Saturday shows us — power always wins.

    “They have been saying no one will remember.
    They have been saying Power rules the world.
    Roll away the stone, see the Glory of God. Roll away the stone.”

  • Reverend Ref

    In a few hours, I will officiate the Holy Saturday liturgy with a handful (or less) of the faithful. I will preach essentially what Fred has posted — we live in the here and now, Jesus is dead, and the world outside goes on as if it doesn’t matter.

    This is the only day of the church year where Holy Communion is not celebrated. This is the Great Sabbath, when the whole world awaits in anxious anticipation of what was promised.

    While not my “favorite” day of the year (that’s Maundy Thursday for me), I’ve discovered that, as a priest, I need this day. In the midst of Holy Week, I need this day of being in the belly of the fish. I need this day of meditating on just what it is I’m doing and what I believe. I need this day of being alone to reflect on hope and promise and how trying to turn and upside-down world right-way around is up to me and us.

    And I need to trust that God is big enough to take care of tomorrow.

  • Amaryllis

    Disqus, why do you hate me? Why do you reject me, twice?

    Very well, one more time, without quotes or links or any attempt at HTML. If you turn your back on me this time, it’s all over between us.

    Ahem.

    Thank you, Fred, for reprinting one of my favorite posts.

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ JJohnson

    After seeing the name mentioned so much, I finally looked up this Spong character.

    Very… unusual. I’m actually VERY confused by what I’m reading.*

    On the one hand he seems to be saying that theism has lost credibility – which is find, that would presumably make him an atheist or agnostic (probably the former with the explicit rejection of the idea of theism; buuut…)

    But then he’s still talking about God.

    And thus I am confused. So there is no God but there is God.

    I realize I’m probably being dense, but… I’m pretty baffled here. Not that I disagree with a lot of his positions; I really don’t; I’m just kind of… well confused.

    I mean, I can understand that kind of argument from a philosophical perspective… is he maybe meaning that he’s some kind of philosophical Christian? Kind of an atheist for Jesus?

    (Please don’t hit me (;_;) I’m not always this dumb.)

    *Obviously I’ve only read a little; I haven’t had a ton of time and I’m not sure how much I want to devote to this.

  • Anonymous

    Spong doesn’t believe that Jesus was anything more than a moral teacher and that the stories of His resurrection as told in the gospels are a metaphor that even though Jesus the man is dead and buried, Jesus the Christ lives on in the memory his followers have of him.

    But it’s been a few years since I’ve read Resurrection: Myth or Reality? so I’m going by memory. I do remember that he’s very clear that Jesus didn’t physically rise from the dead (he notes that the body of Jesus rotted just like any other dead body) and that God as articulated by the more supernaturalist versions of Christianity (or Judaism and Islam, for that mater) doesn’t exist. His idea of God is, IIRC, a more Spinoza-esque sum total of everything.

    He’s a good shorthand for a not-exactly-theistic Christianity, IMO.

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ JJohnson

    Interesting. Definitely something far out of my experience. I shall have to think on this.

  • Persephone

    Power doesn’t always win. The trend is towards an increase in freedom, not the other way around. There are temporary setbacks, but the long-term trend is undeniable. Look at the US. A century ago, women were essentially property and could not vote. Half a century ago, interracial marriage was finally recognized by the Supreme Court and the Civil Rights Act was passed, and in the early part of the 21st Century, gay people are finally getting their turn.

    None of this was accomplished by people sitting around on Saturday and praying for it. It was accomplished by people going out and doing something about it. One civil rights leader in particular (you know who I mean) was a minister, but while he may have prayed for improvement every morning and evening, you can be sure that during the day, he was out there doing something about it.

    Pray in one hand and poop in the other, and see which one fills up first.

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ JJohnson

    Where do you see Fred advocating doing nothing?

    At no point, in any post, have I ever seen Fred say “Do nothing, there is no hope.”

    I have seen him *criticize* that exact point dozens of times, especially in the various Left Behind posts… but I’ve never seen him advocate such a position.

    What he is saying here is not “We lose, there is no point.”

    It can sound that way; but get to the end and you get this bit:

    “And but so, this is why we hope for Sunday and why we live for the hope of Sunday. Even though we can’t know for sure that Sunday will ever come and even if Saturday is all we ever get to see.”

    This doesn’t say to me “We’re doomed unless Jesus comes back and saves us.”

    This says to me:

    “We have to keep living, and fighting, and struggling; in spite of not knowing if things will get better. We don’t know if there ever will be a Sunday, but we go on anyway in the hopes that there will be.*”

    *While I think it’s obvious Fred is talking about the return of Jesus; one can look at it from an entirely atheistic perspective of “Some day when we (humanity) have finally gotten beyond our differences and beyond our own shortsightedness and moved on to better things.”

    We don’t know that that will happen. We don’t know that we won’t kill ourselves off in some fashion or another… but we know we have to try. We know there is a goal worthy of being worked for.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=752002772 Andrew Glasgow

    “We have to keep living, and fighting, and struggling; in spite of not knowing if things will get better. We don’t know if there ever will be a Sunday, but we go on anyway in the hopes that there will be.*”

    *While I think it’s obvious Fred is talking about the return of Jesus; one can look at it from an entirely atheistic perspective of “Some day when we (humanity) have finally gotten beyond our differences and beyond our own shortsightedness and moved on to better things.”

    Fred is talking about Jesus, but I think he is also talking about “Some day when we (humanity) have finally gotten beyond our differences and beyond our own shortsightedness and moved on to better things.”

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ JJohnson

    True, there’s no reason it can’t be both at once. I guess I just sort of rolled the two ideas together (that is, Jesus shows up, and said problems pretty well vanish); but there’s no reason they can’t also be distinct and yet present in the same worldview.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=752002772 Andrew Glasgow

    Hmm, I baked you a post but disqus eated it.

    “We have to keep living, and fighting, and struggling; in spite of not knowing if things will get better. We don’t know if there ever will be a Sunday, but we go on anyway in the hopes that there will be.*”

    *While I think it’s obvious Fred is talking about the return of Jesus; one can look at it from an entirely atheistic perspective of “Some day when we (humanity) have finally gotten beyond our differences and beyond our own shortsightedness and moved on to better things.”

    I think that Fred is certainly talking about Jesus, but he is also talking about a secular hope for “Some day when we (humanity) have finally gotten beyond our differences and beyond our own shortsightedness and moved on to better things,” and arguing that these two things are not in opposition, but in harmony.

  • Loki

    Power doesn’t always win. The trend is towards an increase in freedom, not the other way around.

    It is a very bad idea to believe that there is a trend towards an increase in freedom. Rome achieved the most free society that the world had ever seen, in some respects comparable to ours. Within a hundred years all that freedom was gone, erased, and not coming back for millennia.

    The vague trend towards freedom only emerged because Western Europe (and America) became rich exploiting other people. Which allowed the people their to forget (mostly) about subsistence living and move on towards more complex goals. If you want confirmation of this, the peasants of Germany and Russia were much, much worse off, much more repressed than the peasants of France, let alone the colonials in the Americas. The cry of freedom is not heard where conditions are bad, but rather where they are improving.

    When things are getting worse, well, things tend to keep getting worse. And here, in America, things are getting worse.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=752002772 Andrew Glasgow

    I’m finding the handles on this discussion interesting, and I hope people will forgive me for imagining the actual deities Loki and Persephone deciding to log into Fred’s blog to discuss matters of spiritual import.

  • Rikalous

    But Loki would never use his real name, so it can’t be him.

    …Unless that’s what he wants us to think….

  • Loki

    But Loki would never use his real name, so it can’t be him.

    …Unless that’s what he wants us to think….

    Paranoia is my favorite thing in the universe. I am the god of Mischief.

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ JJohnson

    Don’t forget fire! People always leave out the fire part of your portfolio!

    (I <3 fire. )

  • renniejoy

    IIRC (and it’s been awhile, so don’t hesitate to correct me), Spong’s position is that “theism” equals “believing that God is a person”, and he is arguing that this is no longer credible.

    He sees God as more “in everything” than “over there”.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_NKSS6AC7KAOQ5RHQNPKLZLFVNU jianying

    Spong’s positions have changed over time. from the browsing I have done of his books. The thing that hits you more than anything is that of a journey. Spong has under took a spiritual journey over his life time. A journey that in many ways shook his core. His books are the travelogues of this journey. More than anything I think he would like more people to take such a journey themselves and not accept pat answers. I don’t agree with everything he says but admire his courage in taking on the journey whose destination is so uncertain…

  • Anonymous

    Jianying, I actually find Spong at his most likable when he describes his gradual loss of faith and his realization that he simply could not accept the existence of the supernatural. It’s a kind of moving story.

    I wish, though, that he had simply resigned from his position as bishop when he realized that he could no longer affirm the Creed and the Thirty-Nine Articles.

  • Green Eggs and Ham

    This is the first thing I have read or heard in 25 years that could make me think that I could be a Christian again.

    There is no theodicy here. There is no justification of God as power. There is only a recognition that we live in the dark night of the soul.

    If faith fails, then hope and love remain, and if hope fails, then love remains. And if love remains, all else is well. This may not seem like much of a theology, but it does seem like pretty damn good news.

  • Loki

    This is the first thing I have read or heard in 25 years that could make me think that I could be a Christian again.

    Fred has a tendency to do that to people. I was raised in a nice, liberal Lutheran church, and yet I still lost faith in Christianity. I suppose it might have been the ten page letter (front and back, single spaced) explaining why I was going to hell that might have finally pushed me to the point that my personal philosophy about the importance of giving, of taking care of each other, and of acceptance and tolerance, not to mention everything I have observed about the world around us, is simply irreconcilable with Christianity. That was several years ago, and since then Fred, and Fred alone has been the only person who has actually been able to convince me there is any worth to Christianity at all.

  • Anonymous

    Green Eggs and Ham, if you haven’t seen anything like this in so long, I suggest that you check out some of U2’s music from the 1990s. There’s a lot of wonderful grappling with the questions of Christianity, without pat answers. If you ever get to the point where you feel like you might be able to believe, you can follow that up with All That You Can’t Leave Behind, which is the Easter Sunday following the Saturday of 1990s U2.

  • Anonymous

    I quite like this post, except for the timeline. I don’t think we are actually in Saturday right now. Today is Sunday, when we don’t know anything, but we have heard the rumors swirling around. We have hope that what has been promised will be accomplished; we have faith that God has not abandoned us; we have the love which he taught us to sustain us. As on the road to Emmaus, we should be ready to accept a new word when we hear it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-McGraw/100001988854074 Patrick McGraw

    Loki, I’m sorry for your experiences. For me “the importance of giving, of taking care of each other, and of acceptance and tolerance, not to mention everything I have observed about the world around us” IS my Christianity.

    I may have mentioned this before, but when I see people like L&J praise power and complacency while condemning compassion, it feels like I’m on Earth-3, where the Justice League has been replaced by the Crime Syndicate. And so many people have had to live there all their lives.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-McGraw/100001988854074 Patrick McGraw

    Loki, I’m sorry for your experiences. For me “the importance of giving, of taking care of each other, and of acceptance and tolerance, not to mention everything I have observed about the world around us” IS my Christianity.

    I may have mentioned this before, but when I see people like L&J praise power and complacency while condemning compassion, it feels like I’m on Earth-3, where the Justice League has been replaced by the Crime Syndicate. And so many people have had to live there all their lives.

  • Rikalous

    This combination of compassion and geekiness is why I keep coming back to these threads.

  • Ethan Krindle

    Fred, I just wanted to say that I love this post, and in fact I used portions of it last night while leading a Passover seder with some non-Jewish friends of mine, to help illuminate the meaning of the “test of the open door”. In this test, we open our door to see if Elijah the Prophet will come in and join us; according to legend, he wanders the Earth disguised as a poor person to see how the world treats him. If all the world makes him feel welcomed, he will reveal himself and herald the end of suffering and the beginning of the messianic age; otherwise he remains hidden. Like your read on Easter, I see this test not so much as a condemnation of our continued failure to bring about Irushalayim, a world of universal freedom – rather, the point is to be capable of hoping that a better world is still possible. Because this year, not all doors have yet been opened to Elijah and to the needy; this year, we fail the test of the open door. But we cannot open all the world’s doors for them; we can encourage, and we can help, but in the end there is only one door we can make absolutely certain stays open – our own door. And so we must continue to open that door, and open that door, and open that door… and hope.

    We say, “This year we are slaves, next year in Irushalayim.”
    You say, “Today is Saturday… but on Sunday, love wins.”

    I think in many respects we aspire to the same thing.

  • We Must Dissent

    Reading Fred’s blog over the past six months or so, particularly posts like this, had made me think about getting involved with organized Christianity. But then I had Easter lunch with part of my family, where my sister started going on about how poor people have chosen to be poor and what a great injustice it is that I’m getting $50 from the federal government and didn’t have to pay any taxes when she has to pay such outrageous amount. (She’s probably in the upper end of the 25% bracket.)

    Today, I remember full well why I don’t go to church anymore.

  • Sgt. Pepper’s Bleeding Heart

    @We Must Dissent

    I hate that stories like yours are true and so common–said as a part of “organised” Christianity. It’s such as indictment on the church that we turn off people who are repulsed by exactly the sort of stuff that repulsed Jesus. I’m really sorry.

  • We Must Dissent

    I suppose I should add that my sister and my mother, who was supporting her position, are “good, church going folk”.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=659001961 Brad Ellison

    Woodie Guthrie wrote a song about Jesus, to the tune of the Ballad of Jesse James, which ends with a true and sobering reflection:

    This song was written in New York City
    Of rich men, preachers and slaves
    Yes, if Jesus was to preach like
    he preached in Galillee,
    They would lay Jesus Christ in his grave.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDS00Pnhkqk

    I’m not as good as the Slacktivist, but thinking on that, I found myself trying to talk about Easter Sunday the same way he talked about Holy Saturday, and ended up throwing it up on my blog, should anyone care to look at it. http://bradellison.wordpress.com/2011/04/24/i-am-the-resurrection-and-the-life-saith-the-lord/

  • Anonymous

    @We Must Dissent My sympathies, and you know this clown probably goes to church or makes a big deal about “family values” too, http://www.metafilter.com/102841/Making-Ebenezer-Scrooge-look-like-an-ok-guy

  • Anonymous

    Jessica_R, thank you for posting the link to that article about Michigan Senator Bruce Caswell. I am flabbergasted. For those who don’t take the time to click on it (although you should), Caswell has proposed a plan whereby foster children in Michigan could only use their clothing allowance in thrift stores. Caswell says his father bought all his clothes at thrift stores when he was a kid. (Implied: “and I turned out all right.” Many comments on the article: “No, Senator. No, you didn’t.”) Caswell himself says that the plan wouldn’t save the state any money! Words fail.

    But, curious about Caswell’s religious affiliation, I checked several websites providing biographical information on Michigan’s legislators, including Vote-MI.org. (Rather than try to embed a bunch of links, I’ll just suggest googling “Bruce Caswell” and “religion.”) Caswell pretty consistently gives “no response” to the question about religion/religious affiliation or just leaves it blank.

    Points for not pandering on that issue, at least.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=659001961 Brad Ellison

    Jessica_R, thank you for posting the link to that article about Michigan Senator Bruce Caswell. I am flabbergasted. For those who don’t take the time to click on it (although you should), Caswell has proposed a plan whereby foster children in Michigan could only use their clothing allowance in thrift stores. Caswell says his father bought all his clothes at thrift stores when he was a kid. (Implied: “and I turned out all right.” Many comments on the article: “No, Senator. No, you didn’t.”) Caswell himself says that the plan wouldn’t save the state any money! Words fail.

    “And when he planned to steal our sunlight, he crossed that line between everyday villainy and cartoonish super-villainy. “

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=752002772 Andrew Glasgow

    Caswell has proposed a plan whereby foster children in Michigan could only use their clothing allowance in thrift stores.

    What… the… FFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUU…

    I’m all about thrift stores, I buy a lot of stuff from them, but sometimes you really just want to know that no one’s been wearing the boxers you’re wearing before you wore them, amirite?

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ JJohnson

    As I said on the Crooks and Liars thread on the subject:

    This is Snidely Whiplash evil. Next up: Tax incentives to tie damsels to train tracks. Also a bill restricting orphans to gruel (and no more than one serving at a given meal).

  • P J Evans

    Treating foster children like they’re second-class citizens – I’ve heard of people doing that, and using the payments they get for supporting the foster kids, for their own purposes. It’s wrong.

    Besides which, no one deserves getting only previously-used clothes. (Except possibly the people who think it’s a good idea.)

  • Sgt. Pepper’s Bleeding Heart

    While we’re sharing stories of WTFery, here’s a tweet from the head of the Australian Christian Lobby earlier today:

    “Just hope that as we remember Servicemen and women today we remember the Australia they fought for – wasn’t gay marriage and Islamic!”

    To save time, I’m thinking about getting a stamp made up that says “WTF Australian Christian Lobby?”

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/5OPDTGMVEFDYDKHEXSNNWOFNWY Jim

    And with Fire domain, you get free access to at least one Flame Strike a day. How is that not awesome?

    Thanks for the post, Fred. It kind of reminds me of that moment in “Epiphany,” season . . . two? of Angel: “Nothing you do matters, so all that matters is what you do.”

  • Anonymous

    And with Fire domain, you get free access to at least one Flame Strike a day. How is that not awesome?

    That baby sammich didn’t work out the way I thought it would. Maybe I should consider switching religions here….

  • http://www.facebook.com/nanarama61 Nan Bauer

    Thank you, Fred. I think I have found my soulmate, though we may never meet. I was referred to you via this post on my blog: http://nanarama.wordpress.com/2011/04/29/guys-and-eats/
    pax