Something close 2 nothing

So last night I heard “Give Me Three Steps” on the radio. Nice to hear some catchy Skynyrd without having to try to get past the whole praise-of-segregationist-governors thing.

Lyrically, the first verse of “Give Me Three Steps” is brilliant:

I was cutting the rug
Down at a place called The Jug
With a girl named Linda Lu
When in walked a man
With a gun in his hand
And he was looking for you know who

He said, “Hey there fellow
With the hair colored yellow,
Watcha tryin’ to prove?
‘Cause that’s my woman there
And I’m a man who cares
And this might be all for you”

The rhyme scheme there — I’m unsure exactly how one writes these things — is something like: AAB, CCB, DDB(ish), EEB. That’s fairly elaborate and very satisfying and generally pretty cool.

Sadly, though, they can’t sustain that through the rest of the song. The later verses are catchy and funny, and the overall story is amusing, but after that audacious beginning, there’s a bit of a let-down that the initial rhyme scheme gets abandoned.

The same thing happens with another brilliant story-song, Prince’s “Raspberry Beret,” which starts off:

I was working part time in a five-and-dime
My boss was Mr. McGee
He told me several times that he didn’t like my kind
‘Cause I was a bit 2 leisurely

Seems that I was busy doing something close to nothing
But different than the day before
That’s when I saw her, ooh, I saw her
She walked in through the out door, out door …

That first stanza has the same rhyme scheme as the beginning of “Three Steps,” then varies a bit, and the latter verses, again, wander even further from that initial AAB, CCB pattern. It’s also a great song all the way through, but there’s that same tiny let-down as it strays from the exhilarating opening rhyme scheme.

So anyway, here’s my question: Are there any pop songs (rock, country, rap, Broadway — any genre) that sustain this AAB, CCB rhyme scheme from start to finish? It seems like Cole Porter, Ira Gershwin, Gilbert & Sullivan or Irving Berlin ought to have pulled that off at some point, but I can’t think of any examples just now.

The closest thing I can come to this is “Blinded by the Light,” in which a young Bruce Springsteen sets out to channel Bob Dylan and winds up, instead, channeling Lewis Carroll:

Madman drummers bummers and Indians in the summer with a teenage diplomat
In the dumps with the mumps as the adolescent pumps his way into his hat
With a boulder on my shoulder feelin’ kinda older I tripped the merry-go-round
With this very unpleasing sneezing and wheezing the calliope crashed to the ground

Some all-hot half-shot was headin’ for the hot spot snappin’ his fingers clappin’ his hands
And some fleshpot mascot was tied into a lover’s knot with a whatnot in her hand
And now young Scott with a slingshot finally found a tender spot and throws his lover in the sand
And some bloodshot forget-me-not whispers daddy’s within earshot save the buckshot turn up the band

I couldn’t begin to chart out the rhyme scheme of that song, and it’s not entirely consistent — varying between three and four internal rhymes per line — but its sustained for the entire song. Sure, it’s easier to stick to a rhyme scheme when you’re rattling off cryptic nearly nonsense lines like:

In Zanzibar a shootin’ star was ridin’ in a side car hummin’ a lunar tune …

But it’s still a dizzying and dazzling feat to keep that up for four verses without sliding into utter nonsense.

And but so anyway, can anyone think of other songs in the “Three Steps”/”Raspberry Beret” mode? And are there any that keep that rhyme scheme all the way through?

  • http://post-modernenlightenment.blogspot.com Enigma32

    There’s a few songs that keep a similar rhyme scheme but not identical to the AAB CCB rhyme. Far more common is the ABABCBC or the AABBCC (any song ever by 5FDP)

    Raspberry Beret, from just those lines, is AABBCCCC – which is really strange, because you don’t normally rhyme words by themselves. That’s poor form if you’re trying to sustain a rhyme scheme, because it’s lazy. It doesn’t seem like it’d be a hard rhyme scheme to keep up either, especially when you’re using words that are relatively easy to rhyme.

    While not what you asked for, a song with a unique rhyme scheme like the ones you listed I can think of right off the top of my head is “Angriff” by Front Line Assembly, and it can be found here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDKG5De_8js

    Be warned. This song is … a rather “cheery” song that’s related to war. (Angriff being the German word for “Attack” and the name of a paper published by the Nazis. This is not by coincidence.) If you’re at all familiar with Rammstein or KMFDM, this sounds like their stuff (FLA is actually from Vancouver).

    This song has a rhyme scheme of XAXAXBB CCDDEEXX FXFX XAXAXBB XXXXXXX FXFX GG CC FXFX FXFX FFF, where X is words that have no matching rhyme in the song. The rhyme schemes aren’t accidental either – they’re intentionally because they help keep the flow of the song. I also included the German in the chorus of the song, which is the FXFX. If you translate it, there’s no rhyme there at all. The second bridge has one or two forced rhymes, but none of them are true rhymes, so I didn’t count them as such.

    I’ll be interested in seeing if anyone has a matching song, though. As an English teacher, hunting for rhyme schemes in songs is one of the things I keep as a lesson plan, because it appeals to students with a musical and linguistic intelligence.

  • Amaryllis

    I regret that the first thing to pop into my head was “The Famous Pig Song.”
    Which is close, at AAB, CCB, DDE, FFE:

    ‘Twas an evening in October, I’ll confess I wasn’t sober,
    I was carting home a load with manly pride,
    When my feet began to stutter and I fell into the gutter,
    And a pig came up and lay down by my side.
    Then I lay there in the gutter and my heart was all a-flutter,
    Till a lady, passing by, did chance to say:
    “You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses,”
    Then the pig got up and slowly walked away.

    Full lyrics at http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiPIGINEB4.html

    Country-music performance at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gnv_M49Kyd8&playnext=1&list=PLF4BCE77978ED0601

    There’s got to be others; I’ll let you know if I think of anything more cultured.

    Edited, because, Disqus. I hope the links are correct.

  • Amaryllis

    Oh.  And also, if you count the sometimes wavery internal rhymes, Sid Kipper’s Hate Story.

    Kind of a cheat, I guess, because the “B” lines are almost identical all the way through, but it does fit the scheme.

    I really must think of something serious…

  • Baf

    The first thing that comes to mind for me is The Cremation of Sam McGee, which unfortunately doesn’t fit your request because it’s a poem, not a song.

    Unless someone’s put it to music. And honestly, I’d be surprised if no one had.

  • Amaryllis

    OK, last submission: The Decemberists, with Rox in the Box

    It keeps the scheme for the two verses, although it loses it on the refrain. Still, at least it’s recent.

  • Arrogantemu

    “If life seems jolly rotten
    There’s something you’ve forgotten!
    And that’s to laugh and smile and dance and sing!

    When you’re feeling in the dumps
    Don’t be silly chumps
    Just purse your lips and whistle, that’s the thing…”

    Kipling loves this rhyme scheme, as do Robert W. Service and Banjo Paterson… but they’re not songwriters exactly.

  • Arrogantemu

    Oh! Of course! “Veni Sancte Spiritus” (pick any setting you like… Josquin, Lassus – although it can be sung disturbingly well to Oasis’s “Champagne Supernova”)

  • scott (the other one)

    Couple thoughts, Fred. 1st, while Skynyrd’s use of the Confederate flag has always bothered me–and more with each passing year–I’m not sure how much of a defense of a segregationist governor “Sweet Home Alabama” is: critic Dave Marsh points out that after the line “In Birmingham they loved the governor,” the backup singers exclaim “boo! boo! boo!” I wish all my political enemies were defended thusly. 

    I also have to disagree with the rest of “Gimme Three Steps” being a letdown. Rather than the standard macho posturing the confrontation might have led the listener to expect, the singer makes it clear that having a gun pointed in his face makes him actually piss himself, not something I can recall hearing in a lot of other pop songs, especially those from southern artists. 

  • Anonymous

    “If You Were A Priest” by Robyn Hitchcock:

    If you were a nun
    I would surely run
    Way down to the hospital and
    Cover all your charts
    With decorated hearts
    A palpitating ritual and

    Every verse maintains the AAB CCB rhyme scheme.  If I’m not mistaken, the B rhyme in every verse is a broken extended rhyme.

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ JJohnson

    This is the first song I thought of.  Note that it’s pretty hard to make out the lyrics between the verses, however the verses themselves seem to hit something similar.  That said I’m terrible at music, rhyming and poetry (I write prose for a reason dammit…) – so I could be way off. ><

    I am of course speaking of the Ballroom Blitz – Which even if I’m totally wrong about the rhyme scheme is a very enjoyable song >.>m

    “Oh! I see a man in the back,
    as a matter of fact,
    his eyes are as red as the sun!

    And the girl in the corner,
    let no one ignore her,
    because she thinks she’s the passionate one!

    Oh! Yeah! It was like lightning,
    everybody was frightening,
    and the music was soothing,
    and they all started grooving,
    Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah…

    And the man in the back,
    said ‘everyone attack!’,
    and it turned into a ballroom blitz

    And the girl in the corner,
    said ‘boy I want to warn you,
    it’ll turn into a ballroom blitz’”

    >.> Am I at least in the ballpark here?

  • Anonymous

    rest of BRB – the verses

    “Well it’s been getting so hot, living with the things you do to me
    my dreams are getting so strange, like to tell you everything i see

    i see a man in the back as a matter of fact, his eyes are as red as the sun
    and the girl in the corner let no one ignore, cuz she thinks she the passionate one

    Oh! Yeah! It was like lightning,everybody was frightening,and the music was soothing,and they all started grooving,Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah…And the man in the back,said ‘everyone attack!’,and it turned into a ballroom blitz

    i’m reaching out for something, touching something’s all i ever do
    i softly call you over, when you appear there’s nothing left of you

    now the man in the back is ready to crack as he raises his hands to the sky
    and the girl in the corner is everyone’s mourner she can kill you with a wink of the eye

    Oh! Year! it was electric
    so frightfully hectic
    and the band started leaving
    ’cause the all stopped breathing

    refrain
    first chorus
    refrain

    It’s it’s a ballroom blitz, it’s it’s a ballroom blitzIt’s it’s a ballroom blitz, yeah, it’s a ballroom blitz

  • Anonymous

    edit for typos.
    sorry about that.

    anyway, as far as i can tell, BRB is pretty much the perfect example of this – the verses are AA BBC DDC, then EE FF, and the choruses are AA BB CC D.

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    …held up like a loofah by the foreman of the night…

  • http://www.blogger.com/home?pli=1 Coleslaw

    Sorry, double post.

  • http://www.blogger.com/home?pli=1 Coleslaw

    In a canyon, in a cavern
    Excavating for a mine
    Lived a miner, forty-niner
    And his daughter, Clementine

    It doesn’t keep the scheme the whole way through, either.

  • tdcjames

    You mentioned Gilbert & Sullivan.  Their best patter song (not excepting “Major-General”) is the Lord Chancellor’s Nightmare Song from Iolanthe:

    When you’re lying awake with a dismal headache
    And repose is taboo’d by anxiety,
    I conceive you may use any language you choose
    To indulge in, without impropriety…

    Et cetera. The last stanza breaks with the form, less by abandoning it then by pushing it to new heights of awesomeness.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_W5GFw3yLw

  • http://dtm.livejournal.com/ Daniel Martin

    Run DMC’s “Walk This Way” is written in basically that rhyming pattern, though after AABCCB, they change to a different “B”.  (So rhythmically it’s a bunch of six line stanzas, each with their own AABCCB pattern)

    Some lyrics sites will run the first two lines and the 4th and 5th lines together on some of the stanzas, so that it looks like (AA)B(CC)B, but there’s nothing in the audio to justify that grouping.

  • Ken

    Neither music nor the rhyme pattern you want, but the longest similar pattern I’ve heard of is in Dante’s Divine Comedy.  It’s in tercets, first and third lines rhymed, second line rhyming with the first and third of the next tercent; thus ABA BCB CDC DED … for hundreds of lines per canto and thousands of lines in total.

  • Ken

    Neither music nor the rhyme pattern you want, but the longest similar pattern I’ve heard of is in Dante’s Divine Comedy.  It’s in tercets, first and third lines rhymed, second line rhyming with the first and third of the next tercent; thus ABA BCB CDC DED … for hundreds of lines per canto and thousands of lines in total.

  • rm

    I always thought it went “I was cuttin’ a rug/ at a place called Shug’s.” The name “Shug” is short for “Sugar,” so I always found it odd that they pronounced it to rhyme with “rug,” but then they gotta rhyme. I don’t know if I’m wrong about the lyric. It is brilliant poetry, though.

    You can count on Shel Silverstein to keep a rhyme scheme popping all the way through the end. This is from the middle of “A Boy Named Sue:”

         Well, I hit him hard right between the eyes
         And he went down, but to my surprise
         He come up with a knife and cut off a piece of my ear
         But I busted a chair right across his teeth
         And we crashed through the wall and into the street
         Kickin’ and a-gougin’ in the mud and the blood and the beer

    That last line is one of the best poetic lines I know. This has the AABCCD rhyme scheme (in most verses, including this one, AABCCB so that the six lines hold together as a unit).

    Some of the examples above are more like what Daniel Martin described, where the first two rhymes could be seen as internal rhymes in one line, so it’s an ABCD rhyme (or ABCB) where the A and C rhymes double internally, (AA)B and so on. “A Boy Named Sue” can’t be read that way. The rhyming couplets vary in the number of syllables but not in their beat — they have an Anglo-Saxon beat of two hard stresses, a caesura, and two more hard stresses. You can’t run them together; they go “da DUN da DUN, da DUN da DUN” and somehow this beat brings closure at the end of each line so you can’t elide them together. Then the third line brings five beats and it all runs together with no pauses, ending with a new rhyming sound, which somehow completes the action of the couplet and gives us a longer pause before the action starts again.

    And all through this there are internal rhymes and alliteration spicing up the sound. It’s brilliant.

  • Lurkmaster 3000

    Always Look on the Bright Side of Life
    words and music by Eric Idle

    Some things in life are badThey can really make you madOther things just make you swear and curse.When you’re chewing on life’s gristleDon’t grumble, give a whistleAnd this’ll help things turn out for the best…
    And…always look on the bright side of life…
    If life seems jolly rottenThere’s something you’ve forgottenAnd that’s to laugh and smile and dance and sing.When you’re feeling in the dumpsDon’t be silly chumpsJust purse your lips and whistle – that’s the thing.
    And…always look on the bright side of life…
    For life is quite absurdAnd death’s the final wordYou must always face the curtain with a bow.Forget about your sin – give the audience a grinEnjoy it – it’s your last chance anyhow.
    So always look on the bright side of death Just before you draw your terminal breath
    Life’s a piece of shitWhen you look at itLife’s a laugh and death’s a joke, it’s true.You’ll see it’s all a showKeep ‘em laughing as you goJust remember that the last laugh is on you.
    And always look on the bright side of life…

  • Lurkmaster 3000

    Sorry about the formatting. Looked good when I posted it…

  • http://gocart-mozart.blogspot.com gocart mozart

    Fred, you left out the best part ;)

    “And gocart mozart was checkin’ out the weather chart to see if it was safe to go outside
    And little Early-Pearly came in by her curly-wurly and asked me if I needed a ride,”
    I couldn’t resist.

  • jedgeco

    “Skynyrd’s use of the Confederate flag has always bothered me–and more with each passing year–”

    Same here, although I think that two factors come into play: 1) for some reason, the Confederate battle flag gets embraced by a lot of rockers to symbolize general “rebellion” (i.e., drinkin’, fightin’, f**kin’, etc.), ignoring the repellent history of the symbol; 2) Skynyrd is not from Alabama, but from Jacksonville, FL, my home town.  Because of its geography — in the southern U.S., but not part of what most people think of as “the South” — I’ve found that a lot of Jacksonville residents have a weird “southern envy,” and tend to overcompensate by embracing stereotypical aspects of southern culture.

  • http://lonesomenumber1.livejournal.com/ Chris

    For what it’s worth, I’ve read that Ronnie Van Zant disliked using the flag as the backdrop. Their label, MCA, came up with the idea.

  • muteKi

    I’ve got a few similar songs.

    Quite a fan of Dylan’s Seven Days. Relatively high-tempo song with a pretty similar rhyme scheme, at least in the chorus. I’m quite fond of the lineup Dylan had around this time, and his sound from around then (the Rolling Thunder Revue era) I imagine is what would happen if the Clash played folk styles.

    In addition, if Fred’s fond of that sort of rhyming he’ll probably be quite fond of Carbon Leaf whose music tends to incorporate more elaborate and clever rhyme schemes.

    “Grey Sky Eyes” is the sort of pattern typified by the first verse in Gimme Three Steps (although in a slower tempo); from the same album, “Life Less Ordinary” has a different rhyme scheme but it’s more in the spirit of the frenetic rhyming pace of GTS, staying tongue-twistingly tight (notably, it’s not as regular a pattern); “What About Everything?” is similar as well and even has additional rhymes in the middle of lines. Again, these are all from the same album (Indian Summer), and the other songs are also no lyrical slouches.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=30319652 Tim Lehnerer

    Hot damn, I get to mention one of the best pop songs ever written (“Have I the Right?” by the Honeycombs):

    Have I the right to hold you?
    You know I’ve always told you
    That we must never ever part
    Oh ooh ooh oh
    Have I the right to kiss you?
    You know I’ll always miss you
    I’ve loved you from the very start

    Come right back I just can’t bear it
    I’ve got this love and I long to share it
    Come right back I’ll show my love is strong

    Have I the right to touch you?
    If I could you’d see how much you
    Send those shivers running down my spine.
    Ooh Ooh
    Have I the right to thrill you?
    You know I’ll wait until you
    Give me the right to make you mine.

    Well, Come right back I just can’t bear it
    I’ve got this love and I long to share it
    Come right back I’ll show my love is strong.

    Oh yeah.All right![Break]

    Have I the right to hold you?
    You know I’ve always told you
    That we must never ever part.
    No no no no no no
    Have I the right to kiss you?
    You know I’ll always miss you.
    I’ve loved you from the very start.

    Come right back I just can’t bear it
    I’ve got this love and I long to share it
    Come right back I’ll show my love is strong.
    Oh yeah yeah
    Come right back I just can’t bear it
    I’ve got this love and I long to share it
    Come right back right back where you belong
    Oh yeah
    You belong
    Oh yeah
    You belong

  • Amaryllis

    Thought thought during a boring business meeting this afternoon: y’know, Michael Smith did some clever things with internal rhymes in Dead Eygyptian Blues.

    Oh Mister Tut they dig the tomb
    All that gold leaf brightens up a room
    But what’s the diff when you’re a stiff what riff they’re playing
    When your ears have spent five thousand years decaying
    What does it matter what possessions you may boast
    When you’re just a ghost it’s only jive, Clive
    Your sarcophagus is glowing but your esophagus is showing
    Who cares how rich you are love
    When you look like Boris Karloff…

    Video here.

    Edited, because Disqus.

  • http://profiles.google.com/joshuaaaron Joshua Taylor

    Johnny Cash sang Wayne Kemp’s “One Piece at a Time“:

    Well, I left Kentucky back in ’49
    An’ went to Detroit workin’ on a ‘sembly line
    The first year they had me puttin’ wheels on cadillacs

    Every day I’d watch them beauties roll by
    And sometimes I’d hang my head and cry
    ‘Cause I always wanted me one that was long and black.

    One day I devised myself a plan
    That should be the envy of most any man
    I’d sneak it out of there in a lunchbox in my hand
    Now gettin’ caught meant gettin’ fired
    But I figured I’d have it all by the time I retired
    I’d have me a car worth at least a hundred grand.

    and so on

  • chris the cynic

    When I read that I immediately think of “The Hunting Song” even though that song starts with a different, more pedestrian, rhyme scheme of AABBCC, the third stanza is the only one that has what Fred is talking about.

    The whole thing is
    AABBCC
    DDEECC
    FFGHHG
    IIJJCC

    Third Stanza:
    The law was very firm, it
    Took away my permit,
    The worst punishment I ever endured.
    It turned out there was a reason,
    Cows were out of season,
    And one of the hunters wasn’t insured.

  • Saffi

    In The Decemberists’ “The Infanta,” the five stanzas are six lines long: two short lines followed by a longer one, then repeat.  These lines rhyme according to the pattern AAB CCB, and on it’s face, the song is not as complicated as “Three Steps” because the pattern only repeats once per stanza.  But it also has an internal rhyme in the two beats preceding the end of the third and sixth lines – sort of an “AAbbC   DDeeC” pattern.

    It’s incredibly complex, and not perfect – sometimes the rhyme is a real stretch and depends heavily on Colin Meloy’s pronunciation (he even makes ‘girls’ and ‘barbs’ sort of rhyme).  And in a few spots we lose the rhyme entirely.  But those spots are made up for by brilliant wordplay, lush imagery and allusions to intricate subplots with just a few phrases.  (For instance, in the second stanza, with the seething, spiteful baroness and the pun on her title.)
    This is just an amazing song:”Here she comes in her palanquin
    on the back of an elephant
    on a bed made of linen and sequins and silk
    all astride on her father’s line
    with the king and his concubines
    and her nurse with her pitchers of liquors and milkAmong five score pachydermeach canopied and passengered
    sit the duke and the duchess’s luscious young girls
    within sight of the baroness
    seething spite for this lithe largesse
    by her side sits the baron, her barrenness barbs her…”
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AT_sPE4ahJk

    (Some people may remember this song being used in a “Mad Men” montage.)

  • Saffi

    Ouf.  Hopefully this will fix the formatting so that the above lyrics make sense:

    Here she comes in her palanquin

    on the back of an elephant

    on a bed made of linen and sequins and silk

    all astride on her father’s line

    with the king and his concubines

    and her nurse with her pitchers of liquors and milk

     

    Among five score pachyderm

    each canopied and passengered

    sit the duke and the duchess’s luscious young girls

    within sight of the baroness

    seething spite for this lithe largesse

    by her side sits the baron, her barrenness barbs
    her…”

  • Tonio

    critic Dave Marsh points out that after the line “In Birmingham they
    loved the governor,” the backup singers exclaim “boo! boo! boo!”

    I think that line is undermined by the defensiveness of the verse that slams Neil Young for “Southern Man.” In general, whenever Southern whites sound defensive about their region’s history, or use euphemisms like “heritage,” they risk sounding as if they’re excusing or condoning what happened. (And before anyone gets in an uproar, I feel the exact same way about Americans in general who sound defensive when mistreatment of Native Americans comes up.) A good analogy is that it’s impossible for non-blacks to use the N-word ironically. No one is blaming Southern whites today for what happened 150 years ago or even 75 years ago. But I do blame those whites or those Americans when they adopt postures of righteous victimhood regarding other ethnic groups or other nations. I suppose that instead of defensiveness, I would want white Southerners, or Americans in general, to treat those pasts as mistakes that shouldn’t be repeated.

  • Anonymous

    I had myself convinced that Bobby Bare’s “The Winner” would be one of these songs, until I went and actually looked up the lyrics again. 

    The hulk of a man with a beer in his hand he looked like a drunk old fool
    And I knew if I hit him right I could knock him off of that stool
    But everyone said “Watch out; that’s Tiger Man McCool
    He’s had a whole lot of fights, and he’s always come out the winner.”

    But I’d had myself about five too many, and stood up tall and proud
    I faced his back, and I faced the fact that he had never stooped or bowed
    I said “Tiger Man, you’re a pussycat!” and a hush fell on the crowd
    “Let’s you and me go outside and see who’s a winner.”

    So, technically, the rhyme pattern is AAAB CCCB DDDB EEEB – except that every single verse ends with the word “winner,” so it’s only rhyming with itself.  Does that count?  :-P  The rhythm of the lines is perfect for an internal rhyme, except there are only a few places he actually pulls it off.  (Verse 1, line 1; verse 2, line 2 for examples)

  • frazer

    It’s not the same rhyme scheme, but I’ve always liked the clever internal and end-of-line rhyming in The Beatles’ “I’ve Just Met a Face”:

    I’ve Just Seen a Face LyricsArtist(Band):The BeatlesReview The Song (73) Print the Lyrics  Send “I’ve Just Seen a Face” Ringtones to Cell I’ve just seen a face,I can’t forget the time or placeThat we’d just met, she’s just the girl for meAnd I want all the world to see we’ve metMmm, mmm, mmm, mmm mmm mmmHad it been another dayI might have looked the other wayBut I had never been awareAnd as it is I dream of her tonightLa, di, di, da di diFalling, yes I am fallingAnd she keeps calling me back againI have never knownThe likes of this, I’ve been aloneAnd I have missed things and kept out of sightBut other girls were never quite like thisMmm, mmm, mmm, mmm mmm mmmFalling, yes I am fallingAnd she keeps calling me back againI’ve just seen a faceI can t forget the time or placeAnd we’d just met, she’s just the girl for meAnd I want all the world to see we’ve metMmm, mmm, mmm, la di diFalling, yes I am fallingAnd she keeps calling me back again

  • frazer

    It’s not the same rhyme scheme, but I’ve always liked the clever internal as well as end of line rhyming in The Beatles’ “I’ve Just Met a Face”:

    I’ve just seen a face,I can’t forget the time or placeThat we’d just met, she’s just the girl for meAnd I want all the world to see we’ve metMmm, mmm, mmm, mmm mmm mmmHad it been another dayI might have looked the other wayBut I had never been awareAnd as it is I dream of her tonightLa, di, di, da di diFalling, yes I am fallingAnd she keeps calling me back againI have never knownThe likes of this, I’ve been aloneAnd I have missed things and kept out of sightBut other girls were never quite like thisMmm, mmm, mmm, mmm mmm mmmFalling, yes I am fallingAnd she keeps calling me back againI’ve just seen a faceI can t forget the time or placeAnd we’d just met, she’s just the girl for meAnd I want all the world to see we’ve metMmm, mmm, mmm, la di diFalling, yes I am fallingAnd she keeps calling me back again

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-McGraw/100001988854074 Patrick McGraw

    Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah” certainly seems to fit.

  • Anonymous

    I think Tex Williams’ song “Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette)” featured in the opening for the movie Thank You For Smoking has a pattern that’s somewhat close to this. It’s more like AAB, CCB, DDE, FFE, etc.

    I also find “Little Lion Man” and “The Cave” by Mumford & Sons satisfying, lyrically and otherwise, although they do not fit this pattern.

  • DeeDee

    So many nursery rhymes come to mind, most only a single stanza except for Jack and Jill.

    There was a little girl
    Who had a little curl
    Right in the middle of her forehead.
    When she was good
    She was very very good
    And when she was bad she was horrid.
       

  • Bokonin

    “Little Audio Sparkler and the Slightly Scary Gentlemen of Rock”by Monkey Typing PoolThey were sprung unto the world as good and gracious spheres of gentle warm.Their height and mass did not exceed two standard deviations o’er the norm.They want to rock’n’roll till 2 a.m.; it’s notarized on these here forms.They’re more popular than that guy where, in his father’s house, are cramped and tiny dorms.They’ll only catch the slower rabbits, but they’ll surround and firmly nudge your clock.They’re Little Audio Sparkler and the Slightly Scary Gentlemen of Rock.They were born to trot and jog, to go unshaved, and join in fun disorder.Their school was out for weeks when its librarian found cracks and weakened mortar.They party like it’s 1953 in their maroon and rusted four-door.Their angel drew the cartoon on page 47 of the newsstand’s new New Yorker.The clock struck one, but glancingly, and missed the others, hick’ry dick’ry dock.They’re Little Audio Sparkler and the Slightly Scary Gentlemen of Rock.They’ve suffered napalm hamstring tears and scratchy fever they’re blaming on the drizzle.Their velveteen ground-level semidetached apartment just got shelled by Viscount Missile.Ooh-ooh-ooh la-la, voulez-vous crochet?But if they don’t thrive (they’re staying alive),Survivront…they won’t lie down to drive (they’ll survive)Ne se couchent…or use the wrong fork and kniveMauvaise couteau…to eat Belgian endive.Manger endive…They’ll only catch the slower rabbits, but they’ll surround and firmly nudge your clock.They’re not Me-First and the Please-Sir-May-I-Have-Some-Mores, or The Tallest Man on the Block.They’re Little Audio Sparkler and the Slightly Scary Gentlemen of Rock.AAAABB , CCCCBB , DDEEEEBBB.  Iambic nonameter except during the bridge.  The French harmonies were inserted, says Monkey Typing Pool’s Jeff Norman, to deal with “endive” being an obvious cheat.

  • Bokonin

    Oy, I don’t know how to format on Disqus.  If this doesn’t work either, or indeed if it does, you can go to http://spanghew.wordpress.com/2010/01/06/voulez-vous-crochet/ for lyrics as well asMP3 and songwriter notes.
    “Little Audio Sparkler and the Slightly Scary Gentlemen of Rock”by Monkey Typing PoolThey were sprung unto the world as good and gracious spheres of gentle warm.Their height and mass did not exceed two standard deviations o’er the norm.They want to rock’n’roll till 2 a.m.; it’s notarized on these here forms.They’re more popular than that guy where, in his father’s house, are cramped and tiny dorms.They’ll only catch the slower rabbits, but they’ll surround and firmly nudge your clock.They’re Little Audio Sparkler and the Slightly Scary Gentlemen of Rock.They were born to trot and jog, to go unshaved, and join in fun disorder.Their school was out for weeks when its librarian found cracks and weakened mortar.They party like it’s 1953 in their maroon and rusted four-door.Their angel drew the cartoon on page 47 of the newsstand’s new New Yorker.The clock struck one, but glancingly, and missed the others, hick’ry dick’ry dock.They’re Little Audio Sparkler and the Slightly Scary Gentlemen of Rock.They’ve suffered napalm hamstring tears and scratchy fever they’re blaming on the drizzle.Their velveteen ground-level semidetached apartment just got shelled by Viscount Missile.But if they don’t thrive(they’re staying alive),they won’t lie down to drive or use the wrong fork and kniveto eat Belgian endive.They’ll only catch the slower rabbits, but they’ll surround and firmly nudge your clock.They’re not Me-First and the Please-Sir-May-I-Have-Some-Mores, or The Tallest Man on the Block.They’re Little Audio Sparkler and the Slightly Scary Gentlemen of Rock.AAAABB , CCCCBB , DDEEEEBBB.  Iambic nonameter except during the bridge.  The French harmonies were inserted, says Monkey Typing Pool’s Jeff Norman, to deal with “endive” being an obvious cheat.

  • kiki

    Here’s an excerpt from ‘I Like The Boots’ by Alan Moore. It’s a song about a girl who’s turned on by fascism, sung by a cabaret singer in the original V For Vendetta:But at rallies in the night with all the
    torches burning bright I feel a stirring in me I cannot neglectAnd
    I’ll grasp with mad abandon any lad with an armband on whose cute salute
    is manly and erect! I like the boots (dada dada dada da) I like the
    at-ti-tude I like the point at which the legal meets the lewd I like
    the thrill (dada dada dada da) of the triumphant will I like the
    marching and the music and the mood!The chorus goes ABBDDB, but the verses are AABCCB. And rhyming ‘abandon’ with ‘armband on’ is pretty audacious.

  • Lazy Shaman

    The closest I can find, which definitely touches on this whole scheme is the AAAB CCCB Scheme the MC “Gift of Gab” (from Blackalicious) uses on one of his songs on his most recent record. The track is called “In Las Vegas”, and this rhyme scheme falters a fair bit in the final extended verse, but its certainly worth a look in. Here’s the Youtube Link and the transcribed lyrics from some site: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pXJFchQhIk&feature=BFa&list=PL2A1694D7F3D09CBF&amp;
    index=22 The Lyrics go like this:

    Clearer days, crazy nights

    Heaven seems so far away so

    Who am I

    To deny

    I could use some time to play so

    All aboard, if you need

    Me I’ll be ah in Las Vegas

    In las vegas [x5]

    Let’s take a trip today

    A little getaway

    So I can get away

    From all the drama

    So I get in the plane

    So I can get some space

    Clear out my mental haze

    And clean my karma

    So feelin really great

    Flew to this little place

    So I could stimulate

    A happy aura

    So I exit my base

    This is a little taste

    Of when I went to Vegas

    Back in the summer

    Clearer days, crazy nights

    Heaven seems so far away so

    Who am I

    To deny

    I could use some time to play so

    All aboard, if you need

    Me I’ll be ah in Las Vegas

    In Las Vegas [x5]

    So I get off the plane

    Smilin like ‘what today? ‘

    Right now a brother may

    Take off his slippers

    That was the purpose, hey

    Just to relax and maybe

    Put some words on paper

    But then the picture

    Got cloudy with temptation

    From all the gamble tables

    To the pretty ladies

    To all the bars for

    Like every 20 feet

    Now see that’s plenty drinks

    With all this Hennessey

    Man I’m a goner

    Clearer days, crazy nights

    Heaven seems so far away so

    Who am I

    To deny

    I could use some time to play so

    All aboard, if you need

    Me I’ll be ah in Las Vegas

    In Las Vegas [x4]

    So I’m corrupted now

    My wallet was in doubt

    But now there’s fuzz and powder

    Inside the content

    My liver’s puffin out

    My credit’s runnin out

    I’ll go for one more round

    Cause maybe I’ll hit

    The lucky number slot

    Won back what I have lost

    I gotta taste ya now

    I’m goin nonstop

    Now that my credits out

    Although my head is poundin

    Just then I jetted out

    Up To the pawnshop

    Sold everything I had

    To a Korean lad

    And in the back he had

    A fly masseuse place

    With ladies lookin bad

    One of them took me back

    The ending that I had

    Was happy

    Oops wasted

    Everything again

    So now my trip must end

    These vices suck you in

    I didn’t come for

    All this so I escaped

    This is a little taste

    Of when I went to Vegas

    Back in the summer

    I’m interested in Rhyme Schemes and variations, and there are certainly interesting ones within Hip Hop, so if I can come up with any others, I will post them here.

    Hope this is the kinda thing you looking for.

    Peace,

    Lazy Shaman

  • Lazy Shaman

    Sorry for the formatting and longness of the comment above… Should have checked it better before posting…


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X