Recent Republican jobs proposals

The Republican Party opposes President Barack Obama’s jobs bill, which Macroeconomic Advisers says will boost America’s GDP and add more than 2 million jobs in the next two years. (See also former McCain campaign economist Mark Zandi — who says the bill would create 1.9 million jobs next year.)

But it’s not as though Republicans don’t have any ideas of their own about how to create jobs. Here are three recent Republican jobs proposals, all of which were really offered in earnest by Republican lawmakers.

1. Importing invasive snakes

A ban on exotic invasive species of snakes, such as the Burmese python, is Exhibit A for the Republican argument that over-regulation is strangling job creation:

In the on-going battle over the dismal state of the jobs market, Republicans argue that a “regulatory tsunami” from the Obama administration is choking off jobs growth. Committee members say the free market should handle the giant pythons and that government tampering would “devastate a small but thriving sector of the economy.”

2. De-fund Injury and Illness Prevention

It’s not just the dynamic Burmese python importation business being hobbled by government red tape, it’s also all those workers not being hobbled by injuries. A recent Republican budget proposal in Congress proposed economic stimulus through the elimination of the Labor Department’s Injury and Illness Prevention Program, ending research into repetitive-motion injuries, and getting rid of that rule about workers on rooftops needing safety harnesses.

The short-term harm to safety-harness manufacturers will, I suppose, be overcome by increased spending at emergency rooms.

3. Dwarf-tossing.

No, really. See, those Big Brother socialists in Tallahassee banned the demeaning spectacle in 1999, but a Republican Florida lawmaker says repealing that ban — like all deregulation — will create jobs:

“I’m on a quest to seek and destroy unnecessary burdens on the freedom and liberties of people,” [Fla. Rep. Ritch] Workman said. “This is an example of Big Brother government.”

So don’t let anyone tell you that Republicans don’t have any ideas for creating jobs.

  • P J Evans

    Do we even occupy the same objective reality?
    Based on the last ten years, I’d say no.

  • P J Evans

    Do we even occupy the same objective reality?
    Based on the last ten years, I’d say no.

  • P J Evans

    You must have forgotten the statement, back early in Bush-the-younger, that ‘we create our own reality’.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reality-based_community

  • P J Evans

    You must have forgotten the statement, back early in Bush-the-younger, that ‘we create our own reality’.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reality-based_community

  • Emcee, cubed

    WARNING: I am not completely familiar with acceptable language and terms associated with this issue. Please excuse me if I say something that might be construed as offensive. None is intended.

    My admittedly limited understanding of some of the issues behind the ban:

    1.) There are physiological issues inherent in dwarfism that make this type of thing particularly dangerous. Dwarfs are more likely to sustain damage than a regular-sized person would be from similar circumstances.

    2.) There were no standards or regulations about protective padding or any kind of safety attire. Dwarfs were usually wrapped in velcro or foam rubber padding or whatever the bar owner/employer felt like using. This more often gave the illusion of safety (staving off possible complaints of abuse) without any actual safety. And because of the above-mentioned physiological differences between dwarfs and regular-sized people, vulnerable areas could be un – or under-protected.

    3.) There is a strong history of exploitation in the “sport”. It was not uncommon for bar owners to let dwarfs with an obvious drinking problem (I have heard that there is a high rate of alcoholism among dwarfs, but have no data to back this up, so I don’t want to portray it as fact) run up a tab so large they would have trouble paying it off, and then offer to let them work it down by becoming a tossee. Or just letting them get drunk and then saying, “Hey, do you want to do this?” Either way, there was a lot of taking advantage. There were likely some places that didn’t do this, possibly even many or a majority, but it was a major issue.

    4.) Regulating dwarf-tossing like you would any other sport or hazardous occupation, would have amounted to a ban anyway. Dwarf-tossing is essentially a bar game more than a sport, like beer pong. If they had to actually buy equipment, bars wouldn’t actually do it. The whole point is that it was cheap to do.

    There may be other things, but these are points I’ve heard made in some of the articles I read on it.

  • Emcee, cubed

    WARNING: I am not completely familiar with acceptable language and terms associated with this issue. Please excuse me if I say something that might be construed as offensive. None is intended.

    My admittedly limited understanding of some of the issues behind the ban:

    1.) There are physiological issues inherent in dwarfism that make this type of thing particularly dangerous. Dwarfs are more likely to sustain damage than a regular-sized person would be from similar circumstances.

    2.) There were no standards or regulations about protective padding or any kind of safety attire. Dwarfs were usually wrapped in velcro or foam rubber padding or whatever the bar owner/employer felt like using. This more often gave the illusion of safety (staving off possible complaints of abuse) without any actual safety. And because of the above-mentioned physiological differences between dwarfs and regular-sized people, vulnerable areas could be un – or under-protected.

    3.) There is a strong history of exploitation in the “sport”. It was not uncommon for bar owners to let dwarfs with an obvious drinking problem (I have heard that there is a high rate of alcoholism among dwarfs, but have no data to back this up, so I don’t want to portray it as fact) run up a tab so large they would have trouble paying it off, and then offer to let them work it down by becoming a tossee. Or just letting them get drunk and then saying, “Hey, do you want to do this?” Either way, there was a lot of taking advantage. There were likely some places that didn’t do this, possibly even many or a majority, but it was a major issue.

    4.) Regulating dwarf-tossing like you would any other sport or hazardous occupation, would have amounted to a ban anyway. Dwarf-tossing is essentially a bar game more than a sport, like beer pong. If they had to actually buy equipment, bars wouldn’t actually do it. The whole point is that it was cheap to do.

    There may be other things, but these are points I’ve heard made in some of the articles I read on it.

  • Lori

     Hyperboly and referencing famous books one obviously either didn’t read or didn’t understand are two big pet peeves of mine. 

     

    As they should be. 

  • Lori

     Hyperboly and referencing famous books one obviously either didn’t read or didn’t understand are two big pet peeves of mine. 

     

    As they should be. 

  • Anonymous

    I give up. We’re clearly living in the Onion.

    Well, that explains why I’ve been crying all the time.

  • Anonymous

    I give up. We’re clearly living in the Onion.

    Well, that explains why I’ve been crying all the time.

  • Anonymous

    I give up. We’re clearly living in the Onion.

    Well, that explains why I’ve been crying all the time.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jonathan-Pelikan/100000903137143 Jonathan Pelikan

    I agree with this sentiment. Screw the Teabaggers and everybody who supports them. I’d normally agree with people who say we shouldn’t call them ‘evil’ or ‘the enemy’ on principle, but they ARE. They’re the enemy of this country and its people.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jonathan-Pelikan/100000903137143 Jonathan Pelikan

    I agree with this sentiment. Screw the Teabaggers and everybody who supports them. I’d normally agree with people who say we shouldn’t call them ‘evil’ or ‘the enemy’ on principle, but they ARE. They’re the enemy of this country and its people.

  • http://www.ghiapet.net/ Randy Owens

    And besides, we have the (in)famous words of Gimli son of Gloin, himself: “Nobody tosses a dwarf!”

  • http://www.ghiapet.net/ Randy Owens

    And besides, we have the (in)famous words of Gimli son of Gloin, himself: “Nobody tosses a dwarf!”

  • Matri

    It is at this point in time that I find myself asking, surprisingly un-sarcastically:

    What the fuck are they smoking, and did they at least wait for the high to wear off before making those suggestions?

    Non-white man comes up with a plan to fix the economy that these idiots wrecked, and even his opponents say it will work. But no, the republicans insist on sticking to their to oppose everything he does.

    Then, realizing too late what they just did, decided to toss out a few ideas of their own, in an attempt to not look like idiots.

    You’re hogging the idiot ball, republicans. Good job at that.

  • Matri

    It is at this point in time that I find myself asking, surprisingly un-sarcastically:

    What the fuck are they smoking, and did they at least wait for the high to wear off before making those suggestions?

    Non-white man comes up with a plan to fix the economy that these idiots wrecked, and even his opponents say it will work. But no, the republicans insist on sticking to their to oppose everything he does.

    Then, realizing too late what they just did, decided to toss out a few ideas of their own, in an attempt to not look like idiots.

    You’re hogging the idiot ball, republicans. Good job at that.

  • Lonespark

    That would be funnier if I didn’t know what a stupid, stubborn problem arsenic in drinking water can be.  Still kind of (horrible, dark) funny, though.

  • Lonespark

    That would be funnier if I didn’t know what a stupid, stubborn problem arsenic in drinking water can be.  Still kind of (horrible, dark) funny, though.

  • Lonespark

    I have hope.  I mean, even a mixed record like his first term would be pretty good on a lot of fronts.  But I think Congress will be the difference one way or another.  Need more progressive Critters, kthxbai.

  • Lonespark

    I have hope.  I mean, even a mixed record like his first term would be pretty good on a lot of fronts.  But I think Congress will be the difference one way or another.  Need more progressive Critters, kthxbai.

  • Lonespark

    I have hope.  I mean, even a mixed record like his first term would be pretty good on a lot of fronts.  But I think Congress will be the difference one way or another.  Need more progressive Critters, kthxbai.

  • Lonespark

    I…don’t entirely disagree with that on all levels…  Yet it is clearly an expression or their refusal to live in the world most people inhabit, so screw them.

  • Lonespark

    I…don’t entirely disagree with that on all levels…  Yet it is clearly an expression or their refusal to live in the world most people inhabit, so screw them.

  • Lonespark

    I would like to award you two this joint Internet.

  • Lonespark

    I would like to award you two this joint Internet.

  • Tonio

    In fairness, the proponents of defunding NPR and Planned Parenthood didn’t tout these as budget-balancers, but as the elimination of some “unnecessary” expenses toward that alleged goal. Sort of like a family cutting back on eating out when the money is short. But we’re talking about people who don’t know or don’t care that national economies are not simply larger versions of family budgets. And yes, they’re generally using the deficit issue as a weapon in their culture war.

    So what about people like Judson Phillips, who rants about grants for cow flatulence studies? He has the same incoherency as the aging grumps who sit on their front porches or in bars, griping almost in a stream-of-consciousness fashion about how stupid people have become and how everything is going to hell. Years ago, these were the ones who took Boy George as a harbinger that gender itself was doomed. Something has obviously gotten their goats. In Phillips’ case, suggesting that his goat involved the election of Obama as an easy call, since he talks about “real Americans” and proposes restoring the property owner qualification for voting. With some of the other grumps, I suspect they’re feeling adrift and afraid, and individual things that are far out of the ordinary are convenient to blame.

    In a related issue, here’s my comparison of Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Partyers. The first focuses on economic privilege, seeking to reduce it. The second focuses on social privilege, seeking to preserve it.

  • Tonio

    In fairness, the proponents of defunding NPR and Planned Parenthood didn’t tout these as budget-balancers, but as the elimination of some “unnecessary” expenses toward that alleged goal. Sort of like a family cutting back on eating out when the money is short. But we’re talking about people who don’t know or don’t care that national economies are not simply larger versions of family budgets. And yes, they’re generally using the deficit issue as a weapon in their culture war.

    So what about people like Judson Phillips, who rants about grants for cow flatulence studies? He has the same incoherency as the aging grumps who sit on their front porches or in bars, griping almost in a stream-of-consciousness fashion about how stupid people have become and how everything is going to hell. Years ago, these were the ones who took Boy George as a harbinger that gender itself was doomed. Something has obviously gotten their goats. In Phillips’ case, suggesting that his goat involved the election of Obama as an easy call, since he talks about “real Americans” and proposes restoring the property owner qualification for voting. With some of the other grumps, I suspect they’re feeling adrift and afraid, and individual things that are far out of the ordinary are convenient to blame.

    In a related issue, here’s my comparison of Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Partyers. The first focuses on economic privilege, seeking to reduce it. The second focuses on social privilege, seeking to preserve it.

  • ako

    Years ago, these were the ones who took Boy George as a harbinger that
    gender itself was doomed. Something has obviously gotten their goats.

    You know, someone could probably write quite a good article on right-wing “If it’s not effectively mandatory, it’s doomed!” attitudes as applied to gender, sexuality, marriage, and religion.  Because there have been remarkably similar arguments on all of those points (if people aren’t socially pressured to be cisgendered men and women it is the END OF GENDER, if people aren’t socially pressured to be heterosexual EVERYONE WILL GO GAY AND THE HUMAN RACE WILL DIE OUT, if people are given options other than heterosexual marriage than GAYNESS WILL DESTROY MARRIAGE, and making Christianity just another religious option among a variety of religious options it is OPPRESSING AND TRYING TO DESTROY CHRISTIANITY).  And it all suggests that they don’t see the lifestyle they’re trying to push on the world as having much inherent appeal. 

  • ako

    Years ago, these were the ones who took Boy George as a harbinger that
    gender itself was doomed. Something has obviously gotten their goats.

    You know, someone could probably write quite a good article on right-wing “If it’s not effectively mandatory, it’s doomed!” attitudes as applied to gender, sexuality, marriage, and religion.  Because there have been remarkably similar arguments on all of those points (if people aren’t socially pressured to be cisgendered men and women it is the END OF GENDER, if people aren’t socially pressured to be heterosexual EVERYONE WILL GO GAY AND THE HUMAN RACE WILL DIE OUT, if people are given options other than heterosexual marriage than GAYNESS WILL DESTROY MARRIAGE, and making Christianity just another religious option among a variety of religious options it is OPPRESSING AND TRYING TO DESTROY CHRISTIANITY).  And it all suggests that they don’t see the lifestyle they’re trying to push on the world as having much inherent appeal. 

  • Lori

    A nice bit of proof that not all the anti-marriage equality bigots have completely lost touch with reality—NC Governor Bev Perdue doesn’t want the gays getting married, but she thinks jobs are more important than making extra certain that they can’t. 

     “My top priority
    is creating jobs. Too many people are out of work and I’ve heard from
    several business leaders who’ve told me that the proposed constitutional
    amendment will harm our state’s business climate and make it harder to
    grow jobs here. I believe that marriage is between one man and one
    woman: That’s why I voted for the law in 1996 that defines marriage as
    between one man and one woman, and that’s why I continue to support that
    law today. But I’m going to vote against the amendment because I cannot
    in good conscience look an unemployed man or woman in the eye and tell
    them that this amendment is more important than finding them a job. In
    addition, a number of legal experts have argued that this amendment, if
    passed, could eliminate legal protections for all unmarried couples in
    our state, regardless of sexual orientation. Right now, my focus, the
    General Assembly’s focus, and North Carolina’s focus needs to be on
    creating jobs.”  

    http://www.governor.nc.gov/NewsItems/PressReleaseDetail.aspx?newsItemID=2078

    Baby steps. Baby steps. 

  • Lori

    A nice bit of proof that not all the anti-marriage equality bigots have completely lost touch with reality—NC Governor Bev Perdue doesn’t want the gays getting married, but she thinks jobs are more important than making extra certain that they can’t. 

     “My top priority
    is creating jobs. Too many people are out of work and I’ve heard from
    several business leaders who’ve told me that the proposed constitutional
    amendment will harm our state’s business climate and make it harder to
    grow jobs here. I believe that marriage is between one man and one
    woman: That’s why I voted for the law in 1996 that defines marriage as
    between one man and one woman, and that’s why I continue to support that
    law today. But I’m going to vote against the amendment because I cannot
    in good conscience look an unemployed man or woman in the eye and tell
    them that this amendment is more important than finding them a job. In
    addition, a number of legal experts have argued that this amendment, if
    passed, could eliminate legal protections for all unmarried couples in
    our state, regardless of sexual orientation. Right now, my focus, the
    General Assembly’s focus, and North Carolina’s focus needs to be on
    creating jobs.”  

    http://www.governor.nc.gov/NewsItems/PressReleaseDetail.aspx?newsItemID=2078

    Baby steps. Baby steps. 

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    In fairness, the proponents of defunding NPR and Planned Parenthood
    didn’t tout these as budget-balancers, but as the elimination of some
    “unnecessary” expenses toward that alleged goal. Sort of like a family
    cutting back on eating out when the money is short. But we’re talking
    about people who don’t know or don’t care that national economies are
    not simply larger versions of family budgets. And yes, they’re generally
    using the deficit issue as a weapon in their culture war.

    The other thing is, such politicians always present these things like they think they can keep repeating the mantra “there’s some fat in the system we need to cut!” when by now there IS none left. They’ve had 30 years to do it, so any fat in the system left over is because they purposely left it there.

    Like, gosh, tax breaks for certain companies.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    In fairness, the proponents of defunding NPR and Planned Parenthood
    didn’t tout these as budget-balancers, but as the elimination of some
    “unnecessary” expenses toward that alleged goal. Sort of like a family
    cutting back on eating out when the money is short. But we’re talking
    about people who don’t know or don’t care that national economies are
    not simply larger versions of family budgets. And yes, they’re generally
    using the deficit issue as a weapon in their culture war.

    The other thing is, such politicians always present these things like they think they can keep repeating the mantra “there’s some fat in the system we need to cut!” when by now there IS none left. They’ve had 30 years to do it, so any fat in the system left over is because they purposely left it there.

    Like, gosh, tax breaks for certain companies.

  • http://timothy.green.name/ Timothy (TRiG)

    Hang on. Is this a political party or a surrealist art project?

    TRiG.

  • http://timothy.green.name/ Timothy (TRiG)

    Hang on. Is this a political party or a surrealist art project?

    TRiG.

  • Ima Pseudonym

    WAT.

  • Ima Pseudonym

    WAT.

  • Anonymous

    I’m a herpetology hobbyist (herper), so I’d like to make point about the economics of snakes that I’ve observed over many years fo watching the industry.

    1)  Stopping the importation of Burmese Pythons, Reticulated Pythons, and African Rock Pythons will have a mild deleterious effect on the trade of said pythons, probably in the small increase of wholesale prices.  But that will be about it.  Fun fact: Burm’s and Retic’s have large established snake breeders that make as many as the breeders think they can sell.  They also come in a variety of fetching phases (like a “breed” of dog.)  Bob Clark is a huge name in Retic breeding and you can check out his site at bobclark.com if you don’t believe me.

    2)  Stopping importation of these pythons won’t put anyone out of business.  Jobbers and importers will import or wholesale just about anything.  No one specializes in the importation of Burmese pythons.  They’ll just move on to different species of livestock.  It may make a temporary dent in their income, but it will probably be no big deal.

    3)  Stopping importation will raise the price of adult, breeding pairs/individuals of those species.  Again, since there are already large, established breeding programs, this isn’t a big deal.  I would expect a temporary rise in adult prices, followed by a short price crash that will drive out the breeder hobbyists.  The market will probably then stabilize at about the same current wholesale price (maybe $30-50 dollars higher for normal phase.)

    If the goal were to increase employment in the U.S., then they would discourage the importation of snakes and encourage captive breeding facilities in the U.S. If the goal were to decrease the amount of invasives, then they would have to make ownership of the invasive illegal where it would have a chance of reproducing, like they did for the Hawaiian Islands.

    I have no idea why they would relax snake importation regs.  Unless they were trying to help drug mules.  I’ve heard of pythons being a place where people have stored drugs.  After all, they are a big tube with seals at both ends that generally aren’t checked that closely when being imported.  This is evil.

    Anyways, I’m not sure I’m making much sense, so goodnight.

  • Anonymous

    I’m a herpetology hobbyist (herper), so I’d like to make point about the economics of snakes that I’ve observed over many years fo watching the industry.

    1)  Stopping the importation of Burmese Pythons, Reticulated Pythons, and African Rock Pythons will have a mild deleterious effect on the trade of said pythons, probably in the small increase of wholesale prices.  But that will be about it.  Fun fact: Burm’s and Retic’s have large established snake breeders that make as many as the breeders think they can sell.  They also come in a variety of fetching phases (like a “breed” of dog.)  Bob Clark is a huge name in Retic breeding and you can check out his site at bobclark.com if you don’t believe me.

    2)  Stopping importation of these pythons won’t put anyone out of business.  Jobbers and importers will import or wholesale just about anything.  No one specializes in the importation of Burmese pythons.  They’ll just move on to different species of livestock.  It may make a temporary dent in their income, but it will probably be no big deal.

    3)  Stopping importation will raise the price of adult, breeding pairs/individuals of those species.  Again, since there are already large, established breeding programs, this isn’t a big deal.  I would expect a temporary rise in adult prices, followed by a short price crash that will drive out the breeder hobbyists.  The market will probably then stabilize at about the same current wholesale price (maybe $30-50 dollars higher for normal phase.)

    If the goal were to increase employment in the U.S., then they would discourage the importation of snakes and encourage captive breeding facilities in the U.S. If the goal were to decrease the amount of invasives, then they would have to make ownership of the invasive illegal where it would have a chance of reproducing, like they did for the Hawaiian Islands.

    I have no idea why they would relax snake importation regs.  Unless they were trying to help drug mules.  I’ve heard of pythons being a place where people have stored drugs.  After all, they are a big tube with seals at both ends that generally aren’t checked that closely when being imported.  This is evil.

    Anyways, I’m not sure I’m making much sense, so goodnight.


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