Everybody’s talkin’

Someday, by God, I want to throw a wedding for that kid.”

“You can either be on the right side of history or the wrong side of history. Your choice. But if you’re on the wrong side, be ready to look like an asshole to your grandchildren, no matter how many savings bonds you give them.”

They pitched a fit and wouldn’t leave until something happened.”

(That’s biblical.)

“That is not legal argument or empirical evidence. It is the death rattle of a movement that has no legal argument or empirical evidence.”

“Son, this is a real question, not like them others. How is it possible for a man to go to church for 50 or even 60 years, and it not make a lick of difference in him? Sit there, year after year – in Sunday school and preachin’, readin’ the Bible, listenin’ to sermons and prayin’ prayers – sit there all that time, all them long years, and be just as mean, as mean as a snake, as the day he started goin’?”

In hell, everyone gets a sweater vest.”

“First of all, talking with my mom about mule sex is a little weird, but that didn’t catch me off guard as much as her ruminations about the soundness of a GOP candidate’s positions on sexuality.”

“Yes, I can understand how one might think that being stopped for directions under a street lamp on the corner of an iconic city isn’t a very big deal, but I think it’s pretty much the coolest thing ever.”

“The care of the public must oversway all private respects, by which, not only conscience, but mere civil policy, doth bind us. For it is a true rule that particular estates cannot subsist in the ruin of the public. … We must not look only on our own things, but also on the things of our brethren.”

“The danger with pretending to be persecuted, misunderstood and all alone is that you might wake up and find that it is true.”

Given the history of forced sterilization in Virginia, you’d think they’d be more sensitive on this issue. This is the state where Buck v Bell brought the issue of forced medical procedures to light.”

The class that they call ‘job creators’ used to have another name. Lords.

The trees are the right height.”

- – - – - – - – - – - -

Let me try to defend Mitt Romney for that one. “I love the state,” Romney said of Michigan, his boyhood home. “It seems right here. Trees are the right height.” He went on and on, unfortunately, babbling about lakes in “the parts of Michigan” and, yes, sounding eerily like Steve Carell in Anchorman when he said “I love cars.”

But that bit about the trees was almost poetry. Keep it in the context of the previous sentence: “It seems right here.” This is the fuzzy territory of memory and place and home that can be so hard to articulate. When you say a place feels like home, what do you mean? You mean a whole host of things, some of which you’ll never find words to express. “The trees are the right height,” is a decent attempt.

I think it was Larry Kramer who, on moving back to New York, said he didn’t like the West Coast because “the ocean was on the wrong side.” I know what he meant, and my guess is it’s the sort of thing Romney meant too.

  • FangsFirst

    I don’t hear a word they’re sayin’
    Only the echoes of my mind…

    Guess it’s a day for me to prove I am indeed a part of the everybody that loves Harry. I’m down with a day for Nilsson.
    (sidenote: did not write the song, I know! But it’s Harry Nilsson!)

    (EDIT: oh right, there’s other content here. I’ll read that now…)

  • Twig

    Mitt Romney loves lamp.

  • Twig

    I mean, it’s not that I don’t get what Romney’s going for but – they need jobs, Mitt.  The beautiful state you love so much?  Really needs some jobs.  Which they’ve needed for a while now, even before a lot of the rest of the country went under.  Noticing how beautiful it is – yeah, it does have its moments.

    JOBS.  Mitt.  Tell me how.  Then we’ll chat about the lakes.

  • Guest

    I know what he means about the tress. I miss it too.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jess-Goodwin/28602067 Jess Goodwin

    From another account of that “Anglican Mainstream” conference:

    “Half way through Chris Sugden mounted the stage to warn about ‘journalists in our midst!’ The way he spat out ‘journalists’ implied he thought they were even more sub-human than homosexuals!”

    Watch out! The journalists are coming!

  • FangsFirst

    And I thought of “the trees are the right height” as Fred did–or perhaps just a stumbling cover for, “Er, what do I say next? I’m not sure…” that isn’t all that bad as a next thought.

  • http://www.metagalacticllamas.com/ Triplanetary

    Yeah, there’s a lot of actual stupidity coming out of Romney’s mouth
    that we should be focusing on, stupidity that directly impacts people’s
    lives. And fwiw, I agree – “The trees are the right height” seems like a reasonable expression of one’s yearning for the heimlich*.

    But let me second Twig there. Michigan is one of the hardest-hit states, economically. If you love it so much, fucking help them climb out of this whole.

    Typical Romneyesque conservative thinking, though. “I love America, but I’m content to let millions of its citizens live without adequate healthcare!”

    *That’s heimlich, mind you, not Heimlich.

  • Anonymous

    I’m from Michigan too. I can’t live there anymore, because I can’t drive…but I still miss living where the trees are the right height. I think Romney managed to express something meaningful about a sense of home.

  • Anonymous

    If Romney were a decent human being, who didn’t do things like oh I don’t know argue that Detroit Michigan’s Big 3 should be allowed to go bankrupt, it would be an oddly sweet and touching statement.  Because I get that, mine is “the sky’s too big”, I’m from the mountains, so there’s always that eerie, I’m a long way from home feeling when I’m driving across the plains and the sky just rolls out for miles like a huge canopy. But it’s Windsock Romney so he can go polish his trident.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=687121933 Carrie Looney

    I’m with Fred on The Trees Are The Right Height. I swear, it’s the most sincere thing I’ve heard the man say.

    It doesn’t excuse the fact that his policies will send many residents of the state to said trees as makeshift shelter (and perhaps clothing out of the bark), but still.

    And now that I’ve said something positive about Mitt, I’ll say something positive about Rick Santorum. He makes for some good writing. “So if the way God meant sex to be was between only two married cats – er, I mean people – then why in the world would my pets engage in gay, sterile, face humping?”

  • Anonymous

    Sayles’s article puts me in mind of what McKibben said about the petroleum archons being so recalcitrant because the greater part of their monetary value is not in what they’ve done, but in what they have in reserve (never mind that they could conceivably find ways to use the stuff that DOESN’T involve burning it up). They don’t dare change because they think they’ll collapse utterly and completely if they do. For all that they like to trumpet themselves as tough and resilient, the archons/bosses/predator class/other-term-of-your-choice seem more than a little terrified of what happens if even the slightest change manifests. I’ll own that life in general is probably slightly change-phobic as a matter of course. You don’t choose to evolve; it gets foisted on the population, if not by other creatures, then by seism, wind, and tide. In other words, the real mechanism of change from archaebacteria onwards has been getting death forced upon the population. Not exactly something that’s going to engender much love for change. (And the anarcho-primitivists wonder why peoples would become sedentary or quasi-sedentary when the opportunity presented itself…If anyone abjured quasi-sedentary, I’d not be surprised if the underlying reasoning was “Better the devil you know” rather than any full sense of nomadism being Utopia, or at least Utopia evoked by Stockholming the rigors of the wilds) But the way archons go about it is to the point that it suggests an existence of raw, albeit undetected, terror.

    It’s worth noting that in many non-solitary and non-hive creatures, you can apparently expect to see a LOT of jockeying for the best nesting place/breeding opportunity. With some birds, like bee-eaters, you can often expect the weaker birds to be forced to take burrows that are actually pretty vulnerable to predation. In a sense, it’s the stronger birds being unwilling to take the risk that they can repel predators without the benefit of advantageous terrain. They’re strong, but they don’t see themselves as THAT strong.

    Perhaps that’s why the archons of the archons are so set upon conspicuous consumption. Once you reach points where you can say it’s not directly comforting the possessors in any sustaining or aesthetic fashion, it’s probably an attempt to overawe everyone else, from the laborers to the lower archons, into not changing things even a little. (And then, to secure what little certainty of survival THEY have in comparison to the next caste up, caste number two tries to overawe three on down as much as possible. And so on, and thus the nesting hierarchies known as kyriarchy) The biological imperative impels safeguarding reproductive success whenever possible, and once that’s secured, safeguarding personal existence–and even slight shifting puts them into what, to them, looks like unacceptable risk. Especially when to such ones, “unacceptable risk” is redundant. (Maybe that explains why stock exchanges are preferred to starting new ventures–practically no risk in comparison.) Resilient to the demands of all the lower castes, maybe, but that’s probably more about numbing than any real capability to heal.

    I wonder if critiques of civilization (whether or not we’re talking anarcho-primitivism on the scale of Jensen, Zerzan, etc.) should aim not at the attempt to circumvent the lashes of the wilds–living and unliving lashes alike, predator and seism alike–but rather the archons’ difficulty in realizing that many of the lashes HAVE BEEN circumvented. The archons are essentially using ancient wineskins for their new wine–and so leaving the new wine with suboptimal chances to prove itself. (And see also this being my main grievance with anarcho-primitivists–they seem to believe that there will never be more than one good form of wineskin, and it’s the most ancient one. They’re SURE they’re prizing change, rather than stasis?) The archons are devoured by fear of change, and yet I occasionally wonder if organic life can be distilled down to “matter that developed a sense of fear of outside change” (reproduction is your failsafe–even if YOU get obliterated, the same pattern you held still exists somewhere else). I can understand how the Gnostics reached their vilification of the material universe, but not their fatalism that one should merely hope to escape from it to the spiritual, rather than at least try to reshape it to be less frenetic and self-wracking.

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    It’s weird to agree with Mitt Romney about anything. But I agree with Mitt Romney about Michigan. I miss it too. Florida just isn’t right. I’ve lived here for years, and it still feels completely alien. A large part of that is the biology and geology — and the sky. The sunsets here aren’t real sunsets.

    But I lived in New York City for a much shorter time than I have lived in Florida, and NYC felt like home. So the real difference is the people and the culture. Some of it is shallow (what’s with all the dyed blondes down here?) and some of it is not. There are slums only a few miles away from phenomenally wealthy gated communities. I’m not talking about the “wealthy” I was used to seeing in Michigan, with McMansions and SUVs, I’m talking about huge, real mansions built on the shore. The 1% comes to play here. But the roads are full of potholes because the government is poor.

    I’ve had lifetime health problems, so I’ve seen a lot of doctors. Except for one podiatrist, none of them in Florida have been as good as any I saw in Michigan. (The podiatrist finally diagnosed a back problem none of the doctors I’d seen had even considered, including the one who knew I had to go to the emergency room because of my back pain.) The Florida educational system just isn’t very good.

    I worked in retail for years and years, both in Michigan and in NYC. I’d had rude customers before, but I didn’t know the meaning of the word “rude” until I worked retail in Florida. I had some very nice customers. I also had some customers who treated me worse than I had ever thought possible. They would even spell it out sometimes: “I’m rich, you work retail, you’ll never amount to anything, therefore you exist to do what I say.” I’d never encountered anything like that before in my life.

    It’s nice to think of the trees. Those things do matter. But that’s not what drags you down — it’s living somewhere you can’t get help, remembering a place you could. It’s living somewhere you know a lot of people consider you subhuman simply because you’re not rich, because they’ve told you so. Where there are potholes in the roads and no money to fix them, while new mansions and condos go up a dozen miles away, blocking the view of the Bay for anyone who isn’t a multimillionaire. Where the John Birch society swoops down and kills light rail, thereby keeping it impossible for disabled people to get around independently, and allowing more people to die in car accidents in some of the most ridiculous traffic in the country.

    This is what Mitt Romney wants to make the rest of America. He wants to make Florida worse, too. He can natter about pretty trees all he wants — all it proves is that he’s got eyes. I’d like to see proof he’s got a mind and a heart.

  • http://twitter.com/Jenk3 Jen K

    Seattle is in the foothills of the Cascade mountain range. The Olympic range is also in sight.  The feeling is your’e surrounded by mountains.  My first impression of Florida was that it was way too flat.  Even Denver seemed too flat for me. 

    And yes…trees. :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=687121933 Carrie Looney

    I’m a native of neither Seattle nor California, but I lived a long time in the former and have spent several years in the latter, and yes – _the mountains_.  I miss them.  It just isn’t right to get up in the morning and not see fecking _mountains_ on both sides, and on those perfect days, Rainier…

  • hagsrus

    Esk sat cradling the staff and watching the woods go by. When they were several miles outside the village she said, “I thought you told me
    plants were different in forn parts.”

    “So they are.”

    “These trees look just the same.”

    Granny regarded them disdainfully.

    “Nothing like as good,” she said. 

    (Equal Rites by Terry Pratchett)

  • Ursula L

    Typical Romneyesque conservative thinking, though. “I love America, but I’m content to let millions of its citizens live die without adequate healthcare!”

    Fixed that for you!

  • Lori

    Related to the complete absence of logical reasons for the government to deny gays & lesbians the right to marry, the Maryland Senate passed their marriage equality bill. The House passed it last week, so all that remains if for Gov. Martin O’Malley to sign it. He’s been a driving force behind the law and could do that as early as tomorrow. 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CUJHSQSQYTYT4DPZSKTVESYNQ B

    Yep.  I don’t like Romney, and taken as a whole my impression of that whole little spiel was, “What can I say to get them to forget I opposed the auto bailout?  Errr… lakes!  Er… trees!”

    But I do get what he means by trees that are the right height.  I grew up in Denver and always thought I considered the plains boring, until I moved away and suddenly found myself with this constant vague sense that the sky was too small and the land around me was insufficiently flat.

    (Let’s not talk about how long it took me to learn to navigate without the mountains permanently marking which way was west.)

  • Tonio

    While I am proud of my home state, and proud of my delegate for voting yes, I am not optimistic about the outcome of the likely referendum in November. It cannot be emphasized enough that this should not even go to the voters at all, partly because equal treatment under the law should be the default. And partly because no individual’s choice of marriage partner should be subject to community veto. I would not want that veto power for myself even if it were offered to me.

    Any thoughts as to why so many African-American clergy opposed the measure? i am tempted to think this is mostly theological. But I have heard African-American sociologists suggest that one legacy of slavery is a hardened belief in gender roles, an apparently well-intentioned attempt to protect dark-skinned men from a society that treated then as menaces. What do you think?

  • Anonymous

    And this being the internet, somebody did the Brick/Mitt mashup,  http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=VZbA5RM97DI

  • Lunch Meat

    By the way, I don’t remember seeing anyone post this, and it’s kind of big news…A district court in California ruled DOMA unconstitutional. http://thinkprogress.org/lgbt/2012/02/22/430779/breaking-bush-appointee-finds-doma-unconstitutional/?mobile=nc

  • http://www.facebook.com/jon.maki Jon Maki

    I’m reasonably certain that Romney said “parts” because he had a brainfart when trying to remember the word “peninsulas.”

  • Lori

     
    Any thoughts as to why so many African-American clergy opposed the measure? i am tempted to think this is mostly theological. But I have heard African-American sociologists suggest that one legacy of slavery is a hardened belief in gender roles, an apparently well-intentioned attempt to protect dark-skinned men from a society that treated then as menaces. What do you think?  

    I’m not sure what you mean by this? Are you talking about racist fears of the sexuality of black men leading to an over-investment in social-sexual conformity? If so, I suspect that is at least somewhat of a factor. 

    There’s a long history of racists portraying AA sexuality, especially the sexuality of AA men, as animalistic and uncontrollable. There’s also a long history of bigots portraying gay men in a similar fashion. Put those things together and a AA gay man is really scary to a lot of people. Other issues related to community protection through conformity and issues around relatively high rates of singleness and single motherhood, real & perceived, among AA women probably also play a part. 

    I also think that for many of the AA clergy there’s a pretty straightforward power issue at work. Churches have played a very important role in the AA community and as a result the clergy tend to have a privileged position. Social change threatens all that, so they oppose it. It’s really no different than the Catholic Bishops acting ignorant about pretty much everything that constitutes modernity because they like the idea of going back to the days when the Church said “Jump” and nearly everyone said “How high?”

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    British Columbian here – similar feelings about the mountains! :) It’s always a little odd going to other places and not seeing mountains anywhere :O

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino
  • Ursula L

    I’m not sure what you mean by this? Are you talking about racist fears of the sexuality of black men leading to an over-investment in social-sexual conformity? If so, I suspect that is at least somewhat of a factor.

    There is that.

    There is also the issue of slave-owners looking to justify their actions when they raped the women who were their slaves.

    In the US, slaves did not have the right to legally marry.  But they were human beings, so they formed relationships that were “marriage” in every sense except for the legal one, and which included sharing sex with each other and having children, raising those children together as parents as much as was possible under the horrible circumstances that come with being enslaved.  They also formed other types of sexual relationships, in all the different ways in which humans form sexual relationships.

    But slave owners could look at these not-marriages and claim that the women in these marriages were sluts who would have sex without being married. So when they raped the slaves they controlled, they could imagine that this action did not mean that they were rapists, but rather that the people they raped were worthless sluts, who didn’t deserve/need/want to have their sexual autonomy respected.

    Under these circumstances, is it any wonder that parts of the AA community would focus on the strictest and most conservative definition of marriage, as a way of proving their oppressors wrong?  

    The tricky thing about being progressive is that you can’t see the future.  You can look at the present and identify problems, but the potential solutions you can think up can only be informed by present conditions and your imagination, not by what the results of these reforms will actually be.

    So there are times when the progressively proposed solutions will be the wrong ones.  

    For example, in the 19th century, feminist activists accurately identified the problems that alcoholic husbands created for their wives.  Some of the proposed solutions, such as various married-woman’s property laws, were genuinely helpful.  Others, like prohibition, caused more problems than they solved.  

    The failure of prohibition did not mean that 19th century feminists were wrong in being concerned about the effects that a husband’s alcoholism could have on his wife and children.  They were merely wrong in that one of the many solutions they proposed had unintended and unexpected consequences, and that those consequences (such as giving more power to organized crime) fell outside the area of concern that they were focused on (helping protect women and improve the condition of women’s lives.)

  • Catherine

    I know what Mitt means: I live in England.  Everywhere else is the wrong colour green

  • Tonio

    That’s sort of what I meant. Since white society sought to “emasculate” AA men, perhaps AA society began equating homosexuality with self-emasculation, like it gave the bigots what they wanted.

  • Tricksterson

    That’s actually why, if a Republican does win, I want it to be Mittens.  He’ll stab the social cons in the back before his butt even hits the chair in the Oval Office.  It won’t even be because he wants to.  It’ll just be because it’ll never occur to him not to.  Yes, I’m from Massachusetts, why do you ask?

  • P J Evans

    My place, the  home my heart goes to, has a mountain in it, right there [pointing about 15 degrees left of front center] and a big hill right over there [pointing about 90 degrees right of the mountain]. (I haven’t lived there, physically, for more than 40 years, but I can feel those places. Seeing can bring tears.)

  • P J Evans

     One of my friends described that feeling as ‘there’s nothing around the edges to keep the sky from running out’. It’s weird not having a wall around the bottom of the sky. (Been there, seen, it, like having an edge I can see.)

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CUJHSQSQYTYT4DPZSKTVESYNQ B

    Whereas coming from Denver (which is associated with mountains but is actually on the plains) when I live in places that aren’t big and flat I get the vague perception of being hemmed in.

    It’s weird the things we internalize from our childhood without realizing it!

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ JJohnson

    One thing I like about being from IL ( . .) There’s a LOT of relatively flat places I could go without the scenery changing all that drastically.  That said, the times I went to North Dakota I kept thinking that the ground was ‘lumpy’.  It wasn’t so much the mountains that threw me, it was just how common it was to find myself going up or down and incline of some sort.

    ( . .) *irons North Dakota’s topography*

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Typical Romneyesque conservative thinking, though. “I love America, but I’m content to let millions of its citizens live without adequate healthcare!”

    Reminds me of The Onion video about Bush touring Amercia to survey the damage caused by the Bush presidency.

  • Rikalous

    The clergy in one of our major cities are taking a public stand against the banksters. Our courts ruled DOMA unconstitutional. We’re properly mountainous and have trees that go all the way up.

    Stay classy, California. 

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    So I’ve been thinking about this all day. “The trees are the right height” might sound nice, but it makes no blooming sense for Michigan. The trees there are all different heights, except in certain areas up north, and even then there are different-heighted trees among the Jack Pines. And Mitt Romney’s from Bloomfield Hills, so he can’t get away with pretending he grew up surrounded by Jack Pines. 

    What trees does Mitt mean? Oak, birch, maple, apple, cherry, plum, white pine, poplar? It’s nonsense, and Mitt Romney deserves to be called out on it. Also for not remembering the word “peninsula”. I bet he wouldn’t even automatically point to his hand to illustrate where someplace in the Lower Peninsula was. Faker.

  • JohnK

    I really think that these gay marriage creeps don’t have a leg to stand on. No matter how low the bar is set for them, they just can’t seem to vault over it. The Obama Administration asked the court to consider DOMA under intermediate scrutiny rather than rational basis, but the fact is that DOMA is blatantly unconstitutional even when you apply the lower rational basis standard to it. The only semi-coherent argument against the legalization of same-sex marriage is hatred, and last time I checked we’re not supposed to rely on that any more.

    The Court concludes that, based on the justifications proffered by
    Congress for its passage of DOMA, the statute fails to satisfy
    heightened scrutiny and is unconstitutional as applied to Ms. Golinski.
    Although the Court finds that DOMA is subject to and fails to satisfy
    heightened scrutiny, it notes that numerous courts have found that the
    statute fails even rational basis review.”

    and

    “Prejudice, we are
    beginning to understand, rises not from malice or hostile animus alone.
    It may result as well from insensitivity caused by simple want of
    careful, rational reflection or from some instinctive mechanism to guard
    against people who appear to be different in some respects from
    ourselves.”

  • Donalbain

    I couldn’t read any more from the “worlds worst missionary” when I saw where she was doing her missionary work. A country that is majority Christian. That always makes me angry.

  • http://twitter.com/Rhysdux Rhysdux


    “Son, this is a real question, not like them others. How is it possible for a man to go to church for 50 or even 60 years, and it not make a lick of difference in him? Sit there, year after year – in Sunday school and preachin’, readin’ the Bible, listenin’ to sermons and prayin’ prayers – sit there all that time, all them long years, and be just as mean, as mean as a snake, as the day he started goin’?”

    I’m confused by this question, because I don’t know why going to church WOULD make a difference. I know some people who go to church all the time, pray and listen to sermons, and they’re wonderful people.  I also know some people who are, in the speaker’s words, as mean as a snake, and who also go to church and pray and listen to sermons all the time.

    The only conclusion I can draw is that attending a religious institution or ritual does not make you a better person. It just means that you were physically present.  And that seems mind-bogglingly obvious to me.

    I’m not even sure why this is a question, let alone a real one.  

    *deeply puzzled*

  • http://caffinatedlemur.wordpress.com/ caffinatedlemur

    Yes but the idea behind it is, after 50 or 60 years of being present it’s not entirely unreasonable to think that SOMETHING would have got through to effect a change in a person. Yeah, you’re physically present but it seems to me (and to the grandfather in the story) that you’d have to be in a mentally vegetative state every.single.time you walked into the building for 60 years not to have picked up SOMETHING of the whole point of being there (aside from “because it’s what we’ve always done. That’s a different matter).

  • http://stealingcommas.blogspot.com/ chris the cynic

    Well, generally if you’re going to spend a lifetime making an argument, for example spend you time trying to convince people “You should give your money to the poor”, or, “You should be nice to people for a change,” it’s because you expect that argument to make a difference.

    If telling people, “You should do X,” isn’t going to change the likelihood of them doing X, what was the point of telling them in the first place?

    If people attend a church, or a school, or a training program, or whatever institutation that it intended to teach them something (such as how to treat people, or calculus, or bricklaying, or whatever) and doing it utterly fails to teach them, then I think it makes sense for people to ask why.

  • Michael Cule

    When I go back to Manchester (which I only do a couple of times a year) it’s not the trees but the layout of the streets, the 19th Century industrial terraces that say to me I’m coming to the home of my youth. We’re not big on nature in the industrial North West of England. At least not the sort that doesn’t involve large amounts of craggy moorland being rained on.

    Looking at David Brin’s post, I see he argues (very cogently) that there may be some virtue in investing in new companies or finding capital for already established companies that need it but after that initial socially useful moment the share becomes a token in a complex gambling game.
    It struck me that you could fairly easily distinguish between the two. If you were allowed to sell a new share once and once only at a much reduced capital gains cost then it would encourage people to invest more in new stocks. To disccourage the setting up of companies intended to fail and other devices to treat this as a mechanism to avoid tax unlawfully, you could require the investor to keep the stock for a certain period of time with a minimum say of a calendar year. You could even make the discount greater if they keep it for longer.

    Have there been/are there schemes of this sort? Is that as good an idea as I think it is? Have we any economists and/or accountants on board?  

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    The greatest joke the stock market ever pulled in history was convincing people it’s actually useful for anything even though every econ 101 text you will ever read tells you that the national accounts do not count any stock market transactions in the “investment” column for the purposes of calculating GDP.

    That’s right, folks!

    That GDP number we care about so much?

    Not a dime of it is from the stock market.

    That is because economists, long ago, properly recognized that the vast majority of share transactions (99.5% in any given year on an exchange) are, for the purposes of accounting, simply swaps of assets.

    That is, I give you $10000 for a block of shares in company X, as far as the national accounts are concerned, nothing has been value-added; we’ve just changed the composition of our assets. I have more shares, less cash, you have less shares, more cash.

    The 0.5% of the shares that are new issues are, for national accounts, basically a rounding error that can be assumed to be part of the statistical discrepancy between the incomes and expenses approaches.

  • Lori

     
    I bet he wouldn’t even automatically point to his hand to illustrate where someplace in the Lower Peninsula was. Faker.  

    This is true. I will never forget the look on my ex’s face the first time I did that to show him the location of some place that I had lived. 

  • Lori

     
    The only conclusion I can draw is that attending a religious institution or ritual does not make you a better person. It just means that you were physically present.  And that seems mind-bogglingly obvious to me.  

    I believe this was the grandfather’s point. 

  • CQAussie

    Hi Fred, 

    Thanks for the truck load of links, I read several of them and were blessed by each. The trees in my home town of Sydney are the right height as well =D  And the colour of the ocean is just the perfect shade of blue =D  

    I’ve been sharing this link with all the Christian bloggers that I know today.  Do with it as you see fit:

    http://www.christandpopculture.com/asides/sacred-space-a-plea-for-the-persecuted/ 

    Hint: The post is actually talking about Christians in real persecution for their faith. Not the imaginary kind that so many love to brag about.

  • Anonymous

    I know what he means about “the trees are the right height” – it’s a weirdly human thing for the RomneyBot to say.

    Oddly, enough, I can’t smell cow crap or dead grass in the fall without getting oddly wistful for my childhood years in Oklahoma, and I have an odd affinity for wind that is entirely too strong.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jon.maki Jon Maki

    I don’t miss a whole lot about living in Michigan, but I’m with Romney on the lakes – I did grow up in a town called “Twin Lakes,” after all.*

    Other than that, I mostly miss the low population density which led to things like it taking 30 minutes to drive somewhere because it was about 30 miles away.  That doesn’t happen in Northern Virginia, where even a 10 mile drive can take much, much longer than 30 minutes.

    I also miss the long summer days – I’ve had a very difficult time adjusting to how early it gets dark here even at the height of summer, whereas back home there are times when at 10 PM it’s almost still dusk.

    *Technically, the name of the area I lived in was Lake Roland, which was the name of one of the twins (the other was Lake Gerald) that gave the town its name; I lived on the outskirts of Twin Lakes in an area that didn’t have any kind of signs or anything and was generally considered part of Twin Lakes.  Beyond those two there are lots of lakes in a relatively small area:  Pike Lake, Emily Lake, Little Lake Gerald (which is a small connecting body of water between Roland and Gerald), Clear Lake.  And, of course, Superior was just a few miles away.

  • Victor Savard

     Should have put “IT” here too sinner vic

    Go Figure!
    VictorFebruary 24th, 2012 | LINK I’m speaking from my heart here as a minority and when all of Canada allows “The Blessed Sacrament of marriage” to be alligned with same-sex-marriage and considered legal in all our land because most of our world bishops and cardinals in GOD’s Eyes believe they can no longer do anything about “IT” then “IT” is “Time” to draw the line. When and if “IT” occures, “I” will then give humanity my finger and ware my ring around my neck and then go out into the world and proclaim the Good News that The Sacrament of Marriage was started by GOD (Good Old Dad). He created Adam and Eve and not Adam and Saint Eve or is that spiritual St.Eve who have “Lived” backward and “NOW” joined in marriage by The “Devil” of our days to become Steve….. Anyway…..We got him folks! He’s nothing butt a liar cause he said he would not post anything during “LENT” and what is this? As far as going out into the world, he promised all of U>S (usual sinners) that he would not start his new religion until we’ve proved to him that Jesus was just a nice guy and also wait until his wife died.Listen People! Theis Vs is not only a legend in his own mind butt he’s also a crazy transhuministic ignorant fool who things that everything is butt a big joke! Does he not know that “The End” has already come and gone and if you don’t believe me just ask “The Alien gods “Left Behind” who own this world NOW!Victor, Victor, Victor! Don’t you know that when The U.S. sneezes, The Canadians get a cold and are you not dead already?Who said that? :)http://www.splendoroftruth.com/curtjester/2012/02/the-best-video-regarding-the-hhs-mandate/Sorry Victor didn’t mean to change “IT” on youhttp://www.splendoroftruth.com/curtjester/”IT” is OK sinner vic!Happy “LENT” :(Piece

  • Victor Savard

    Let’s try fixing the paragraphs hay sinner vic and imaginary friends from my heart!

     Should have put “IT” here too sinner vic
     
    Go Figure!
     I’m speaking from my heart here as a minority and when all of Canada allows “The Blessed Sacrament of marriage” to be alligned with same-sex-marriage and considered legal in all our land because most of our world bishops and cardinals in GOD’s Eyes believe they can no longer do anything about “IT” then “IT” is “Time” to draw the line.  When and if “IT” occures, “I” will then give humanity my finger and ware my ring around my neck and then go out into the world and proclaim the Good News that The Sacrament of Marriage was started by GOD (Good Old Dad). He created Adam and Eve and not Adam and Saint Eve or is that spiritual St.Eve who have “Lived” backward and “NOW” joined in marriage by The “Devil” of our days to become Steve….. Anyway…..
    I’m speaking from my heart here as a minority and when all of Canada allows “The Blessed Sacrament of marriage” to be alligned with same-sex-marriage and considered legal in all our land because most of our world bishops and cardinals in GOD’s Eyes believe they can no longer do anything about “IT” then “IT” is “Time” to draw the line.  When and if “IT” occures, “I” will then give humanity my finger and ware my ring around my neck and then go out into the world and proclaim the Good News that The Sacrament of Marriage was started by GOD (Good Old Dad). He created Adam and Eve and not Adam and Saint Eve or is that spiritual St.Eve who have “Lived” backward and “NOW” joined in marriage by The “Devil” of our days to become Steve….. Anyway…..We got him folks! He’s nothing butt a liar cause he said he would not post anything during “LENT” and what is this? As far as going out into the world, he promised all of U>S (usual sinners) that he would not start his new religion until we’ve proved to him that Jesus was just a nice guy and also wait until his wife died.Listen People! Theis Vs is not only a legend in his own mind butt he’s also a crazy transhuministic ignorant fool who things that everything is butt a big joke! Does he not know that “The End” has already come and gone and if you don’t believe me just ask “The Alien gods “Left Behind” who own this world NOW!Victor, Victor, Victor! Don’t you know that when The U.S. sneezes, The Canadians get a cold and are you not dead already?Who said that? :)http://www.splendoroftruth.com/curtjester/2012/02/the-best-video-regarding-the-hhs-mandate/Sorry Victor didn’t mean to change “IT” on youhttp://www.splendoroftruth.com/curtjester/”IT” is OK sinner vic!Happy “LENT” :(Piece


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X