Battling imaginary Satanic baby-killers in Utah and Ohio

This is a disingenuous diatribe against Satanic baby-killers that exist only as an urban legend.

And so is this.

Here, again, is self-proclaimed “authority on Satanists,” Judy Byington:

Secret ceremonies in which malevolent men and women cloaked in hooded robes, hiding behind painted faces and chanting demonic incantations while inflicting sadistic wounds on innocent children lying on makeshift altars, or tied to inverted crosses, sounds like the stuff of which B-grade horror movies are made. …  Some think amoral religious cults only populate the world of ‘Rosemary’s Baby,’ but don’t exist in real life. Or do they?

And here is Marisha Agana, Republican candidate for Congress in Ohio’s 13th District:

History has a way of repeating itself: Stalin , Hitler, Mao Tse Tung and now Obama!!!

I know life begins at conception and therefore those yet to be born are actually living human beings and should be taken care of not killed. Because of this and the position Mr. Barrack Hussain Obama [sic] has taken on abortion directly as well as the use of Obamacare to provide contraception and abortifacient drugs I feel it is proper and important to have included him on the list I tweeted about.

These are the same. These are exactly the same.

They express the same attitude. They are equally based in truth. And they fulfill the exact same emotional need.

Byington needs to believe that there is a global conspiracy of Satanists killing babies. So does Agana.

Byington needs to believe that she is a righteous hero courageously defying a global conspiracy of Satanists killing babies. So does Agana.

At some level, Byington is aware that her courage and heroism are a pose, a fantasy role-playing charade based on nothing real. And so is Agana.

Byington has lost touch with reality, investing her whole identity in a prideful fantasy based on illusory horrors. And so has Agana.

These are the same. These are exactly the same.

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  • hidden_urchin

    If only there were so much concern for living human beings after birth.

  • J_Enigma32

     They do care. This Satanic stuff is a very weird way of showing it, but they do. Their way of showing it is in the strong desire to come along and save the day from the “satanic menace”. They want to be the person who helps save the day; the Level 25 Cleric with the “Jesus” domain who casts Banish at the last minute to save that poor, poor baby from those evil, evil demon worshipers.

    The problem is, you can’t just cast “Summon Greater Jesus” here in the real world and expect it to fix problems. The real world requires a higher level of moral reasoning than their stunted morality* is capable of dealing with; so they try to wash it down into something that fits their narrative better. In the process, they create a world that’s arguably more simplistic than the most didactic fairy tale. And, once again, the real world doesn’t work like this. So they retreat into themselves, cloister themselves away, and become convinced that they have the right answer and the evil world on the outside isn’t interested in it, and embittered because “Summon Greater Jesus” won’t make the problem go away anymore than ducking your head in the same and willing silently will make it go away.

    * Stunted morality here refers to the moral stages that Kohlberg (sp?) theorized. I’m fairly convinced that most right-wing authoritarians and fundamentalists are preconventional morality; “I won’t do it because I’ll get punished with Hell if I do” or “I won’t do it because it’ll help the [insert scare group here]” (which is a form of “I won’t do it because there’s nothing in it for me”). This morality is common in children who haven’t established their own morality yet, and base it exclusively on external stimuli.

  • http://accidental-historian.typepad.com/ Geds

     The problem is, you can’t just cast “Summon Greater Jesus” here in the real world and expect it to fix problems.

    Does that mean they also can’t Summon Bigger Fish?  Or Bigger Loaves and Fishes?

  • AnonymousSam

    If Jesus can cast Summon Bigger Fish, can he also turn water into blue milk?

  • The_L1985

    This, soooo much.  The problem isn’t that they don’t care; the problem is that they’ve been taught that morality is easy to figure out, and so they need Perfect Heroes or, failing that, Puppy-Kicking Villains.

    Re: Erikson, I find that my mother is Level 2A (“What will people think?”)  and my father seems to vacillate between Level 1A (“Will I get punished?”) and Level 2B (“Laws are there for a good reason.”) depending on the situation.  (He says Hell is what keeps him from being a murderer or suchlike, but he’s also been a corporate whistleblower even in situations where it could have cost him his job.)

    I like to think I’m at Level 3, but I’m awfully hesitant to commit to that.  I don’t want to think I’m any better or more developed than the average person.

  • Antigone10

    I know a lot of people don’t like fanfiction. They think it is plagued with Mary Sueism, and that it is lazily taking other people’s stories.  I disagree with that*,  but I can see the argument.

    But I think fanfiction would be EXCELLENT for these people.  Or role-playing games, or LARPing.**  You want to fight the non-ambiguous good fight against the evil hoards while you are the avatar of light and justice?  Those things have you covered.  You don’t actually have to interact with reality, and you get the emotional satisfaction of being the hero.  And, most importantly, no one gets hurt.  The person playing the evil villain, or the totally imaginary villain, is not hurt.  Why is this not the easy solution?  You may not make any money, but your conscience can be clear.

    *I think fanfiction has it’s place for people starting out writing (borrow the already established characters and world to figure out what is “in character” and what is “out of character) to improve upon great idea, bad execution literature (*cough* Left Behind *cough*), or to tell the stories that you wanted to see in a work, but got glanced over in cannon (Kendra from Buffy the Vampire Slayer).** Apologizes if I’m sending assholes to your fun LARP.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Some decent authors have gotten their start writing fanfiction.  Peter David, for example, got some cred going for him by writing Star Trek books (which, let us face it, is just fanfiction that got monitized through a publishing agreement.)  

    I was thinking that video games also might be a good experience for these people.  Or heck, just reading some light fiction might help.  Unfortunately, something “of the world” lessens their conviction.  

    Huh, wonder why.  :p

  • fraser

     Peter David was well-established in comics before he took to Trek, actually.

  • Guest

    Most of the comics Peter David wrote are also arguably monetized fan fiction, since he didn’t create the characters or the Marvel or DC universes himself any more than he created Trek. (Yes, I’m saying basically all writers of long-running mainstream comics are fan fiction writers. Not a slam on them. So is Wicked. So’s Paradise Lost.)

  • VCarlson

    He was writing actual fanfic in actual fanzines, though. I don’t know if this was before or after being published in comics. I rather suspect before, as the fanzines in question were mimeographed, if I recall.

    (In response to the Peter David was well known in comics before being published as a Trek author)

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    These are the  same pukes who invented the lie that Dungeons & Dragons will turn you into a Satanazi baby killer, though.  

    Oh hey, jerks, thanks for trying to ruin my childhood, but it turns out even children can tell that you huge liars.

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ mistformsquirrel

    ( . .) The Truth critically hits them for 2d8+6 damage.

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    Seriously, I think a lot of my teenage angst & rebellion pretty clearly stem from the fact that all the authority figures around me were huge liars who told me that everything I liked was in fact literally captial-E Evil. & that things that were demonstratively true, like evolution, were lies. Why would I believe anything any of them said after that? They’d failed & while I was yet a (soft) Bayesian, I could tell that they were ruined as sources of authority.

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ mistformsquirrel

     I don’t blame you at all.

    For me, I was mostly too TERRIFIED to do any rebelling.  They drummed the whole “YOU WILL GO TO HELL IF YOU ARE BAD” thing into me pretty hard.*  I started to break away in my mid teens, but it wasn’t really complete until college.  I still haven’t told my dad I’m an atheist or bisexual, I think he’d explode or something.

    But yeah, growing up fundie’ll do that to ya, no doubt about it.

    *Also the whole “the world is going to end very soon now” – which was freaking terrifying at that age.

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    Sort of off-topic, I was thinking about the War on Drugs today. Like– lying about marijuana, how is that a good policy? Putting marijuana up as a bogeyman & pretending it will DOOM YOU just means that when a kid tries pot & is like “oh, that was weird but hardly life altering, let alone life shattering” isn’t the next logical thought “so I guess they are probably lying about heroin & stuff, too”?

  • AnonymousSam

    That’s okay, while they were at it, they also made it mandatory for doctors to lie to their patients over two separate issues both related to reproductive rights.

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    Oh I mean, yeah, there are plenty of pretty terrible things done in the name of religion, that is true. Lots to go around.

  • EllieMurasaki

    That’s okay, while they were at it, they also made it mandatory for
    doctors to lie to their patients over two separate issues both related
    to reproductive rights.

    I heard about the ‘abortion increases risk of suicide’ thing. Which I’m not convinced is actually untrue. I am however convinced that no one knows whether it’s true, because the study/ies they cited compared women who got abortions to women who hadn’t, some of whom had planned their pregnancy and others of whom hadn’t been pregnant at all. To actually find out whether abortion increases risk of suicide, they’d have to compare women who got abortions to women who got unwantedly pregnant. And women who got pregnant however, had complications, and chose to try to save the baby, but mostly women who got unwantedly pregnant. For clarity, presenting something as true when one does not, cannot, know whether it is true is a lie.

    What’s the other one?

  • AnonymousSam

    I’d have to hunt for the details, but it was something about doctors being forced to lie to patients with certain conditions that would cause them to want to have an abortion — even when those conditions came with the caveat, “Will kill parent and fetus if attempted to carry to term.”

  • VCarlson

    The Big Lie physicians in some states are forced to tell their (female) patients is that abortions increase breast cancer risk. Which, by now, is one of those zombie lies. As is the one about suicide, I think.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

     IIRC, one of the states, Arizona I think, had a bill requiring doctors to tell another lie: they mandated that the doctor lie about the health of the fetus if the fetus has a developmental defect and the doctor believes that this would lead the mother to terminate the pregnancy.

  • AnonymousSam
  • http://www.oliviareviews.com/ PepperjackCandy

    It wouldn’t surprise me much if women who had abortions have a higher rate of suicide.  For one thing, many are struggling with difficult life situations.  If they weren’t, they wouldn’t have had to have had abortions.

    Additionally, once a woman takes what looks like the only way out of a difficult situation, they immediately start to notice just how hated women who have abortions are in our society.  If our society would treat these women with compassion, or just act like it is no big deal, all of those studies of whether women who had abortions struggle with guilt and depression more than average would find little, if any, significant difference.

  • EllieMurasaki

    It wouldn’t surprise me much if women who had abortions have a higher
    rate of suicide.  For one thing, many are struggling with difficult life
    situations.  If they weren’t, they wouldn’t have had to have had
    abortions.

    My hypothesis is that women who experience unwanted or traumatic pregnancy have a higher rate of suicide, and abortion is kind of incidental, or would be if it weren’t treated like Teh Ebil. I cannot prove any of this because I do not have the training or funding to study it myself and nobody who does have the training or funding is doing the study properly. They’re comparing women who get abortions to women who don’t, instead of comparing women who experience unwanted or traumatic pregnancy and get an abortion to women who experience unwanted or traumatic pregnancy and don’t get an abortion, and instead of comparing women who experience unwanted or traumatic pregnancy (whether they get an abortion or not) to women whose pregnancy is planned, or unexpected but not unwanted. And instead of comparing women who get pregnant (circumstances immaterial) to women who don’t, come to think.

  • Madhabmatics

     What’s hilarious is that Chesterton pointed this out in the late 1800s.

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    Control through propaganda isn’t anything new; you’d think people would realize it is a pretty terrible way to behave by now.

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ mistformsquirrel

     I think you’ve got a good point there, to be honest.  There are times one needs to be deceptive, but they are select and rare, usually it just backfires; and I think we’re seeing a great deal of that backfire today.

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    See also, secrecy.

  • The_L1985

     Mistform, I had that exact same experience.  To the point that, even though I loved books about dinosaurs (moreso than my brother, who as the family’s Only Male Child, actually owned those books), I was a stanch YEC until college.  When the biology teacher at a conservative Baptist college for women tells you, flat-out, that your school was wrong about taxonomy* and evolution, you begin to realize that evolution and Christianity aren’t actually incompatible.  Then the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

    * I was taught two-kingdom taxonomy.  In the 1990’s.  Because A Beka never bothered to update anything.**

    ** Seriously, anything.  It took me years to realize that the story that mentioned a “dime store” was actually talking about the mid-century equivalent of a dollar store.

  • Jeff Weskamp

    You would probably need a Gate spell to summon Jesus, but a Greater Planar Ally spell should definitely get you an archangel.  

    Elijah, of course, cast Flame Strike on his altar when competing with the priests of Baal, then cast Haste on himself to outrace the chariots.  A little later, he cast Weather Summoning to produce the storm that at first looked like a cloud-shaped hand.

    Instead of the “Jesus” domain, I think the two domains Healing and Protection would be more appropriate.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=667708632 Kenneth Raymond


    Instead of the “Jesus” domain, I think the two domains Healing and Protection would be more appropriate.

    No, because Healing and Protection require actually doing good works to show off to people. The Jesus domain is made up mostly of charm and fear spells to get around that picky detail and do the important thing, which is to make others think you’re holy and good by what you say, and afraid of others.

  • Dan Audy

    I think Fred and Rob Bell’s Jesus domain would have Healing and Protection.  The problem is the other group claiming to follow the Jesus domain pretend they have those domains while casting ‘Protection against Uppity Women’.

  • Jeff Weskamp

    Also, Banishment wouldn’t work on the demon worshippers unless they hail from outside the cleric’s plane of existence.  It *would* work on actual demons, though.  Holy Word would be a far more appropriate clerical spell to cast.

  • Loki100

    All I can think of now is my RPG character, which is so heavily based on Baba Yaga she has a chicken legged hut, casting a “Summon Jesus” spell. Talk about awkward…

  • Nassifeh

    This is my district, sadly.  I love Tim Ryan, but the redistricting here has been madness–the 13th District bears no resemblance whatsoever to something that was drawn for anything other than political purposes.  I’m pretty sure that the whole point was that Tim is probably going to get elected wherever he is, and so they wanted to carve out as many Republicans as possible from our geographic area into other districts.  So now we get a campaign with this crazypants Agana lady, who thankfully doesn’t really stand a chance, but a bunch of other districts will probably elect Republicans even though this is not a very red portion of the state.  It’s criminal.

  • Jessica_R

    Well you totally know Satanazis have violet-silver colored eyes that change color depending on the light. 

  • Will

    What?  Hitler, Stalin and Mao were all, well not quite contemporaries, but Hitler and Stalin were contemporaries with each other, as were Stalin and Mao.   That’s a very high turnover rate in history.   

  • http://loosviews.livejournal.com BringTheNoise

    Beware of people who rose meteorically from nowhere like Obama. His agenda has been carefully planned 4 him!!! History has a way of repeating itself: Stalin , Hitler, Mao Tse Tung and now Obama!!!

    This is someone who needs some serious history lessons. None of her examples “rose meteorically from nowhere”. Take Stalin, for example – as a friend of mine on another board wrote “You know how much time and effort it takes to backstab your way into control of Russia?”

  • Nenya

    Why, oh why, must these unhinged rants overuse exclamation points!!! and ,do horrible, things , to the innocent comma?!!

  • Loki100

    I’d be hard pressed to name anyone who “rose meteorically from nowhere.” It generally takes at least a decade of work. And Obama has been “rising” since 1997.

    Obama certainly moved quickly from relative obscurity to the presidency. Although he did deliver a widely praised keynote address at the DNC in 2004. The fact that he is currently president is entirely due to George W. Bush’s spectacular failure as a president, and Kerry’s spectacular failure as a candidate. Those two failures created an opening that allowed Obama to successfully run for president years before he probably thought he could.

  • Magic_Cracker

    My thoughts exactly:

    Hitler entered into politics in 1919, didn’t become Chancellor until 1932, and didn’t have dictatorial power until 1934 … so that’s at 15-year, very public rise to power.

    Stalin joined the Bolsheviks in 1903 and, as your friend noted, spent 31 years backstabbing his way to absolute power, during which time he held various offices and positions within the Bolshevik party and Soviet government.

    Mao became a communist around 1921, participating in labor stuggles, led the Revolutionary Army of Workers and Peasants in 1927, held various Party positions, was a leader in the war against the Japanese in the 1930s and 40s, and didn’t assume control of China until 1949, so that’s 28-year, rather public rise to power.

    None of monsters’ rise to power can be described as “from nowhere” or “meteoric” to anyone who was paying attention at the time or to anyone today who can be bother to to do even the most cursory review of history.

    When people like Marisha Agana make these kinds of sweepingly inaccurate statements, I check the fuck out. I don’t even bother to think about the gross false equivalence of comparing Barack Obama — who I don’t even like* — with monsters like Stalin, Hitler, and Mao*.  If you can’t get your facts right in the first place, your analogy fails.

    *For reasons that have been stated by myself and many other in this forum so many times before that I don’t think it’s necessary now.
    **I think we need to add a fourth 20th century dictator to the list, someone whose name starts with “A” so we can acyonymize the rhetorical invocation of them as “the SHAM fallacy.” Maybe “Augusto” — as in Pinochet? No,  no right-wingers would ever cite him as one of history’s monsters… 

  • LouisDoench

     Idi Amin?

  • Magic_Cracker

    Maybe, maybe …. it’s hard to say. In addition to being a brutal, murderous dictator (which alone isn’t enough to make it onto right-wing shit-list), he was also in the British Colonial Army — and being a tool of the British colonizer used to be a bad thing, but ever since Obama was elected, British imperialism is a good thing and anti-British anti-imperialism is a bad thing. Then again, he got military and security assistance from the Soviets, East Germany, and Libya, and his reign of terror assuredly proves that “those people can’t govern themselves,” plus cannibalism. He might maybe just do.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Charity-Brighton/100002974813787 Charity Brighton

     Assad, maybe? (Not the current one, but his father?) Or Amin, if you like… cannibalism.

  • E-foster

     Hitler didnt rise meteorically from nowhere either, he was trying and failing to take over the government for a long time. he wrote Mein Kampf while in prison for a failed coup.

    Mao didnt rise meteorically from nowhere either, he had been a war hero and national figure for almost 30 years when he became Chairman.

    and Obama didnt come from nowhere either, he was a US Senator for 4 years, and an Illinois state Senator for many years before that.

    if they know jack and shit about the government, then maybe he was unknown to THEM

  • BaseDeltaZero

    *I think fanfiction has it’s place for people starting out writing (borrow the already established characters and world to figure out what is “in character” and what is “out of character)

    This is actually really hard – when writing your own stuff, you can just make up whatever characterization you want, and if you make a mistake, you can brush it off pretty easily.  With fanfiction, you have to get a sense of someone else’s characters and write them correctly.  It’s easier to build something from scratch than try to make an exact (or near exact) replica of something else…

    Also, the main reason I write fanfic is ‘the world/characters are awesome, I must have more!!’

  • The_L1985

     I don’t know.  While fanfic has that extra challenge, I find that sometimes, world-building is hard.  You have to have a mental map of where things are, and you have to decide on different cultures (with additional difficulty if you include sentient non-humans, like elves, aliens, or mermaids), religions, what the weather is like…

    With fanfiction, all the world-building has been done for you, and you can focus on the characters (or on  creating new characters in the same world, who don’t interact with the main cast).

  • http://dpolicar.livejournal.com/ Dave

     

    With fanfiction, all the world-building has been done for you, and you
    can focus on the characters (or on  creating new characters in the same
    world, who don’t interact with the main cast).

    Of course, I can also do this with original fiction set in the real world. I don’t have to decide on cultures, religions, or the weather… I can just look it up.

  • Wing

    It’s not fanfic they want, fanfic generally already has main characters to fight evil (or be evil) and requires adherence to previously understood rules of setting and characterization. Contrary to popular belief we do like to see a little effort put into it, just like in any other genre.

    What they’d want is wish-fullfillment self-insertion, which ironically enough is exactly what the Left Behind series is supposed to be. It’s not, because the protagonists are still fairly useless and can’t do jack all about even the most mundane of evil (though they always get to go in the VIP line), but the concept is the same. If they wrote about someone their age and appearance battling the forces of Satanism with the power of faith and a sawed-off shotgun that might get some of the tension out.

  • The_L1985

     And Left Behind is just poorly-written premillennial-dispensationalism fanfic with Mary Sue main characters, that somehow managed to be published.

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/FDGYHBEWVNGUG763L5X4TON3JQ Nazani14

    Ms. Agana can relax.  A creationist *cough* scholar has determined that if something doesn’t have blood, it isn’t alive.  
    http://www.icr.org/article/6916/
    That leaves at least 6 weeks before the human-under- construction is alive!   Happy aborting!

  • BaseDeltaZero

    That… that article.  It has to be a Poe.  It just agressively does not make… what… I don’t even…

    *Also the whole “the world is going to end very soon now” – which was freaking terrifying at that age. 

    Yeah.  I wasn’t even raised fundamentalist, and I was terrified of the whole ‘world is ending in 2000!’ business…

  • http://nitecaravan.blogspot.com/ Br. Jay

    How sad.  They both seem locked in a fantasy world.

  • Isabel C.

    I seem to remember that one of the prophets could clearly summon dire bears.

     
    History has a way of repeating itself: Stalin , Hitler, Mao Tse Tung and now Obama!! 

    Jesus Christ, this is a Congressional candidate? Is “better writing skills than the average ninth-grader” not a requirement for these things?
    Also, what other people said re: fanfic. I have no problem with *writing* wish-fulfillment self-insertion–I have spent many a long walk constructing stories in which I hang out with Aragorn and Roland and Buffy and kick ALL THE ASS EVER–but if you put that stuff out in public, people are either gonna mock or ignore, and then oh my God will these guys get whiny.

    Same thing for LARPs, actually, except more so, because Mr. Everyone Must Like Me and I Must Do Everything Awesome tends to come off as emotionally manipulative or plothoggy, and eventually one of the more aggro of the other players will throw him in a pond, or at least deliver an “oh my GOD dude you are SUCH A DICK, go and die please,” lecture. 

    Still better than getting into politics, though. 

  • Dan Audy

    Same thing for LARPs, actually, except more so, because Mr. Everyone Must Like Me and I Must Do Everything Awesome tends to come off as emotionally manipulative or plothoggy, and eventually one of the more aggro of the other players will throw him in a pond, or at least deliver an “oh my GOD dude you are SUCH A DICK, go and die please,” lecture.

    That really depends on the particular LARP culture an area.  North American LARPS particularly suffer from it due to geek falacies that won’t restrict the socially inept and it being treated as childish so it is predominantly teens who participate.  The Norweigan LARP scene has produced Jeepform which is a one-shot format designed to create intense and emotional experiences.  Additionally, scattered around North America are communities of LARPers that tend to not get much attention because they don’t bother seeking attention that are composed of adults who run more indepth games that are restrictive on allowing disruptive influences play.  In Edmonton (where I happen to live) there has been a thriving mature LARP community for decades.  In particular I recall a LARP called Sovereign dealing with the nobles and clerics struggling over the reigns of power when the King died without a clear heir which was run by David Gaider, the lead writer for Bioware, which then went on to become the foundation that the Dragon Age games were built around.  The effort players put into their portrayal of the characters that they got, costuming, historical research, and the game itself was staggering.

  • ConservativeWhitebread

    I’m always amazed by this and I’m never sure why.  It’s as if the evil already present just isn’t enough for these people.

  • Magic_Cracker

    Yes, plenty of evil. With which many of them (and us) are complicit. Being good is too haaaaaaarrrrd — much harder than being less bad than a Satanazi.

  • ConservativeWhitebread

    It just also seems that the only way you can consider what I’m classifying as Evil here as not-as-bad-as-babykillingSatanazis (which includes plenty of people allowing babies to die, as well as their mothers) is because they’re not classifying the victims as people.

    Somehow again we’re at the point where only some babies are people and worth saving.

  • BaseDeltaZero

    I don’t know.  While fanfic has that extra challenge, I find that sometimes, world-building is hard.  You have to have a mental map of where things are, and you have to decide on different cultures (with additional difficulty if you include sentient non-humans, like elves, aliens, or mermaids), religions, what the weather is like…

    All very true… but then there’s the times when the original author(s) did not do that work, or at least didn’t give you their notes.  Or they did, but it’s contradictory.  Then you’ve got to do all that worldbuilding, and make it fit with the stories themes/existing canon/whatever.

    They’re both a challenge in different ways.

    He was writing actual fanfic in actual fanzines, though. I don’t know if this was before or after being published in comics. I rather suspect before, as the fanzines in question were mimeographed, if I recall.

    Fanzines were just the precursor to FF.N and it’s ilk, I’m pretty sure they weren’t official…

  • Mau de Katt

    Looks like the LDS are a few decades behind the fundagelicals when it comes to “Satanic Ritual Abuse” hysteria, if that book in the Byington link above is any indication.  Her patient’s “recovered memories” story sounds like nothing more than a mashup of the two big (debunked) SRA books of the early 80’s — Michelle Remembers and Satan’s Underground,” only with some Sybilesque mutiple-personality-disorder fantasticality added for flavor.

    I really hope this sort of thing doesn’t catch on again;  it did enough damage the first time around.

  • Mau de Katt

    Oh dear… that’s what I get for catching up on my reading in reverse order; I read this post before I got to Fred’s original post on the subject of this book.