You better get yourself together

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“It wears me out to see two men together. It does something to me.”

“They are among the kindest, gentlest people I know. They are also among the most unwanted and unrecognized. But they are determined — and their numbers are growing.”

“Evangelicalism isn’t just a system of beliefs. It’s a subculture striving to be a counterculture.”

We truly are Christian warriors, Christian soldiers, and for us as Americans to stand our ground and to firmly send a message to Washington that our nation is about more than just some secular laws.”

“If there is a Christian Right buzzword and dog whistle Perry missed, I sure didn’t see it.”

The job of POTUS is an odd one. Sometimes it involves listening to country singers cover John Lennon songs while you’re wearing a tuxedo and sitting in between your mother and your wife and realizing that your every reaction is being recorded, broadcast and scrutinized. A very odd job is all I’m saying.

Why the disparity between partisan support by the bishops, and by other Catholics?

“Take your severance pay, contact your deacons, and turn in your resignation.”

“The nerve of Planned Parenthood, targeting minority populations for health clinics! Why are there no Planned Parenthood facilities in wealthy areas?”

This was the best statistic they could come up with?

“The broad acceptance of evolution has led more directly, of course, to such other evils as antibiotics, gene therapy, and a basic understanding of biology, but why quibble?”

Despite the evidence of this theory being fully debunked and labeled a myth, the church continues to call it Truth.”

“Emergency contraception also known as the morning after pill does not cause abortion nor does it interfere with an established pregnancy.”

Who needs science when you have Linda Harvey?

“Sea ice in the Arctic has shrunk to its smallest extent ever recorded, smashing the previous record minimum and prompting warnings of accelerated climate change.”

Artists always get the ladies …”

Church Sign Epic Fails: Reader Submissions

  • Worthless Beast

    Oh, the church sign fails… the tombstone one makes me sad.  It’s the “finality” of the message.  If it was in her last wishes to have that done, it’s sad that she can’t see the tackiness of it and change her mind – and if her relations did that to the tombstone, she had no say in it. 

    I live next to a cemetary. Most of the tombstones are tasteful, but there are a few cringeworthy ones. I thought the worst I saw was a clip-art-tastic engraving of a kitten with a ball of yarn.  Some of the colorized American flag stones are a big glaring.  What is worse is the stuff that well-meaning folks leave on graves, not just flowers and lights, but lawn gnome-type stuff…  And it just makes me sad, cringing for people who cannot cringe for themselves anymore.

  • Lori

    Maybe the person really liked lawn gnomes. Some people are tacky as all get out. Others have somewhat off-kilter senses of humor. If I was going to have a grave* FSM only knows what my friends might get a notion to leave on it. My friends don’t really go in for that sort of thing, but you never know and if they were leaving something they thought I’d like the chances are the next visitor to pass by would find it at least a little odd.

    *I won’t, unless someone really screws up. I’ve asked to be cremated and my ashes scattered.

  • Lori

    Totally OT: If there’s anyone in the LA area who needs a free medical, dental or vision check-up Care Harbor is doing an event at the LA Arena this coming Thursday-Sunday. You need to get a wristband in advance and those are being handed out tomorrow. People will begin lining up when the parking lot opens at 7 AM. You have to pick up your wristband yourself because they are non-transferable.

    If you don’t need the service, but you have time to help others who do, they’re still in need of volunteers.

    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2012/09/23/1135659/-Free-Health-Care-LA-Sports-Arena

  • Green Eggs and Ham

     As a Canadian every time I see an announcement like this I am always shocked.  I know you have a very messed up system, but these announcements always remind me how much.  I truly hope (and if I were a praying man, pray) that the ACA is the thin edge of the wedge to universal health care in the US.

  • LoneWolf343

    I’ve noticed that creative wording in the 5-hour energy commercials, too. It’s even less subtle than the corn lobby propaganda saying that “corn sugar is just as good as cane sugar” where they segway from talking about HFCS to “corn sugar” without actually saying they are the same thing.

  • Lori

    As a USian, so am I. It’s a source of both pain and embarrassment that we have to do this. I have no idea how anyone can look at this and think that our current medical system is acceptable, let alone the best in the world.

  • AnonymousSam

    “If evolution is true, why help the poor?”

    I want to know if the man who came up with that is a Republican.

    Then I want to hit him.

  • J_Enigma32

     I had to think a little bit about the “if evolution is true, then why help the poor”.

    As
    near as I can place this epic non-sequatior, it ties into the fact that
    these dense, benighted motherfuckers continually, and purposefully,
    confuse actual evolution with Social Darwinism -  i.e., “Survival of the
    Fittest.” The whole, “I haz muscle, ergo, I can beatz up youse cuz
    that’s how evolution works.” I’m convinced anymore than this is
    deliberate on their part, because they’re boneheaded rubes and refuse to
    listen to anyone who tries to correct them.

    It’s not like these obtuse blockheads need Social
    Darwinism or anything to justify not caring for the poor; this is just
    projection. They do just fine with Jesus and their Prosperity Gospel.

  • Fusina

    As a USian, so am I. It’s a source of both pain and embarrassment that
    we have to do this. I have no idea how anyone can look at this and think
    that our current medical system is acceptable, let alone the best in
    the world.

     Yeah, what this says. I have cousins in Canada, and friends in GB, so I have a good source of what Universal health care looks like to them, and it is nothing like the picture–If I ever meet up with the “genius” who came up with the ob/gyn handling emergency room oncology patients, I am going to give them a smackdown they will never forget. I’ve talked to emergency room docs (I have a “grandma” who spends a bit of time there)–not many ob/gyns working there. GPs, on the other hand…

  • friendly reader

    2 quick thoughts, then a long one:

    1) What if the one soldier who’s life you’re weighing against a million Muslims is a Muslim?
    2) As an East Asian Studies major preparing for her N3 test in Japanese proficiency next month, that bit on Chinese characters supposedly containing clues to the Bible just plain hurt to read.

    Now the longer one:
    3)

    [E]vangelicals are those who know where to find a Jesus poster and who show their children Veggie Tales.

    This is where the term “evangelical” and “evangelical subculture” starts to get very confusing for me, because mainline Protestants do a lot of this stuff too!

    Veggie Tales is very popular in the Sunday Schools of mainline churches where I’ve worked or attended, be they Lutheran or UCC. Why? Because as she says, Veggie Tales is a well-made, hilarious franchise that teaches moral lessons without being overbearingly moralistic.

    WWJD bracelets were a fad for a time at my youth group, and it was used as a conversation starters for small groups.

    Bible version of Apples to Apples? A fun way of spicing up what might otherwise be a dull Bible study for your high school and middle school classes.

    Contemporary Christian music? We listen to it. Usually on CD rather than the radio, but a lot of us have a band or two that we really like.

    What might make mainline groups different in this scenario is that we don’t just show our kids Veggie Tales or play Christian games or listen to Christian music, and my dad only wore his “Confirmed Lutheran” shirt (from the Old Lutheran website) at church events (he got photographed in it at a synod assembly).

    The notion that these things are somehow the exclusive domain of evangelicals, whether Libby Anne intends to or not, plays into the narrative that mainline Protestants leave their Christianity at the church door. That there’s nothing in our outside life that might set us apart as being Christian. That we’re the secular sell-outs.

    But we get involved in the Christian pop culture too, and we have our own tribal markers, though in the ELCA we tend to treat them with a sense of self-deprecating humor (seriously, check out the Old Lutheran site).

    Heck, if you went to my parents’ house, it wouldn’t take you more than a few minutes to realize we were Christian, given the art on our walls and the books on our shelves and the music in our CD rack, but we’re only evangelical in the original sense of the term – Lutheran.

    I dunno, I’m having trouble explaining what it is about the article that irritated me. Can somebody read between my lines to give me ideas?

  • Fusina

    We were given the first Veggie Tales tape by a fundegelical (I love that word) sister in law. The debate between my husband and I was whether to toss it or watch it. We did neither. A while later, we happened to see an episode somewhere, and laughed–they are funny. The silly songs are awesome. I saw an interview with the people who make them, and in case anyone is wondering, yes. The French peas are based on the French knights from M. P. and the Holy Grail. Or so the writers said. Hee, “I’ve got Slushie in my EAR!”

    No the actual stories from the Bible aren’t so nice. But then, I’ve learned that most people aren’t nice. There are a few that are, the rest of us need something to make us be nice. Religion can work, or it can give the not nice people a license to be even nastier to those “other people who aren’t like Us.”

  • P J Evans

    they segway from talking about HFCS to “corn sugar” without actually saying they are the same thing

    The USDA has ruled that they can’t call HFCS ‘corn sugar’, because sugar is crystalline. (It is a nit-picky definition, but it works.)

  • P J Evans

    Ken Ham opening his mouth on science, down near the bottom of the page:
    http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Bill-Nye-warns-Creation-views-threaten-US-science-3888451.php

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    “If evolution is true, why help the poor?”

    My reaction.

  • Carstonio

    Sometimes I wonder if I’m just like an RTC parent who tries to keep his children isolated from secular influences. I know that Veggie Tales is aimed at such parents, but to me it seems like stealth marketing for Christianity, selling the religion to kids under the guise of moral lessons. I have a similar reaction to the FamilyLife book about Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings. It doesn’t help that we have a few relatives who try to give these items to our kids.

  • friendly reader

     See, what you call “selling the religion to kids” is what some of us call “raising our children in our religious tradition.” I know there are some people who believe you should somehow raise your kid religion-neutral, but I don’t think that’s possible nor particularly recommendable. To be clear: I’m not saying you should force children to believe something and never let them question, but yes, parents should be free to teach their children their religious tradition. That’s especially important for groups in the past who have had that right denied to them, like Native Americans.

    Nor is it “stealth” at all. It’s very much about Christianity, what with the humorous re-tellings of Bible stories. If you’re not Christian, no, Veggie Tales isn’t really for you. Skip it, there are excellent non-Christian programs for children. Indeed, beyond Veggie Tales most Christian programming for kids is pretty abysmal, which is part of why it’s popular in denominations who otherwise avoid that kind of thing.

    Nor is it aimed only at parents who want to isolate their kids from “secular influences.” And maybe that’s what I was getting upset at in that article – this notion that something I genuinely like and have seen used in churches that are in no way evangelical get labeled as a sign of the Evil Tribal Evangelicalism. I mean,  if there are some blatantly creationist, patriarchal, homophobic Veggie Tale songs and videos out there that I haven’t seen, let me know. But otherwise…?

  • Carstonio

     I never said that parents shouldn’t be free to teach their religious traditions to their children. I’m describing my own reaction to Veggie Tales. It’s reasonable for me to suspect that the show’s creators also want children who aren’t Christian to join the religion, whether or not this actually influences the show’s content.

    And yes, from the little I’ve seen, Veggie Tales isn’t pushing Evil Tribal Evangelicalism. Two things did disturb me – the whitewashing of the siege of Jericho in one coloring book, and one video with the message “When you lie,  it hurts God’s feelings.”  One of my kids pointed out that there’s no god in Veggie Tales.

    In our home, we make an effort to educate our children about the ways that for-profit advertisers try to get their money. Anything that resembles an attempt to convert is more troubling, at least for me, because it seems like an attempt to get one’s soul, metaphorically. Note that I’m not necessarily describing anyone’s actual motivations. Religious belief is so personal that if I tried to change someone else’s belief, I would feel like I was destroying hir identity.

  • friendly reader

    Religious belief is so personal that if I tried to change someone else’s
    belief, I would feel like I was destroying hir identity.

    I dunno, I feel it’d be pretty damn important to change someone’s belief in, say, homosexuality being a sin or the world created in 7 days or that women are inferior to men or any number of other religious beliefs that are damaging to people. Just because I think parents should be allowed to teach their children these things doesn’t mean that we in society don’t get to tell them they’re crap.

    I don’t know whether Veggie Tales sees itself as a conversion tool; I always saw it as more of a Sunday School activity.

    And yes, they do sometimes whitewash Bible stories; Esther features “sent to the island of perpetual tickling” as a substitute for “execution,” for example. There’s a long tradition of toning down Bible stories for the youngest set. I admit I always feel sort of ambiguous on that. On the one hand, it can definitely set kids up for a shock when they’re older and realize the full version is much bloodier. Should we save all the more disturbing stories for when they’re older? Or should we establish the lessons we see behind them first and incrementally introduce them to the violence? That’s a valid criticism of the series, but also of a lot of children’s programming (the PBS show Wishbone whitewashed the heck out every piece of classical literature they covered).

  • Twig

    Actually, AFAIK, the VeggieTales were bought by a secular company after the original company went under.  I’m not sure what they’re doing with the license now.

    The book written by one of the creators, “Me, Myself and Bob” is actually rather interesting reading both in terms of how successful growing businesses can falter and about the lives, thoughts and feelings of people not like me.  The author assumes an audience similar to himself, so he spends his time on the complications and challenges of his beliefs, rather than trying to sell them.

  • Twig

    Also an interesting study of the early days of computer animation.

  • http://accidental-historian.typepad.com/ Geds

     I’ve noticed that creative wording in the 5-hour energy commercials, too.

    Yeah.  I’d been reading something about the guy who made bacon a breakfast food right before 5 Hour Energy started that ad campaign.  He pretty much pioneered the “doctor study” form of advertising.  They basically called up doctors and said, “Would you say it’s better for people to eat a hearty breakfast?”  They then followed up with, “Would you say that bacon is a hearty source of nutrients?”

    Blam.  That became 4 out of 5 doctors recommending bacon for breakfast.  As weaselly as that is, the 5 Hour Energy thing makes it seem completely and totally honest in every way.

  • Carstonio

    The Jericho whitewashing was troubling specifically because of the tribalism inherent in the story. Very, very similar to the whitewashing in children’s cowboys-and-Indians stories. It’s not necessarily about sanitizing the violence – in fact, I wonder if the unvarnished versions would cause many children to reject the tribalism.

    And yes, I would make the same distinction with beliefs that damage people, particularly if they cause the people to harm others or harm their society. My point is about treating others as if it’s wrong to adhere to any religion other than one’s own, whether or not one actually believes that. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg if someone believes in many gods, one god, or no god. But it does if they push otherizing of gays or ignorance about science or sexism barely disguised as gender essentialism. Attempts to win converts implicitly reject that distinction.

  • http://hummingwolf.livejournal.com/ Hummingwolf

    So I’m reading the Wonkette piece about the “World History & Cultures” textbook and I come across this line, which makes me ask a question:

    Evolutionists claim that man “evolved” from the animals; they downplay man’s special characteristics of speech, reason, morality, and free will and portray him as just a “highly evolved” animal.

    The question is:  Do any actual biologists working in the 21st century ever use the phrase “highly evolved” for any serious purpose?  Because in my mind, that phrase is associated with two groups of people:

    1.  New Agers who say they’re highly evolved as a way of explaining why they’re more special than you, and

    2.  Racist anthropologists circa 1910 who claimed that the people of northwestern Europe were more highly evolved and, therefore, better than everybody else.

    Am I missing something?  Does the phrase “highly evolved” have a legitimate use in science these days?

  • http://www.facebook.com/chrisalgoo Chris Algoo

    There was an episode of MLP that featured a heavily whitewashed cowboys-and-indians story! It felt a little uncomfortable.

  • http://jamoche.dreamwidth.org/ Jamoche

    Every time I see an ad say something was “clinically tested” I wonder if that phrase has any real meaning at all.

  • The_L1985

     ”Because as she says, Veggie Tales is a well-made, hilarious franchise that teaches moral lessons without being overbearingly moralistic.”

    I dunno.  Maybe it’s me, but I never was able to enjoy Veggie Tales much.  Like the hairbrush song in the video–I’m sorry, but a hairless cucumber looking for a hairbrush just isn’t funny to me.

    Then again, I had aged out of the target demographic by the time they came out.

    “What might make mainline groups different in this scenario is that we don’t just show our kids Veggie Tales or play Christian games or listen to Christian music, and my dad only wore his “Confirmed Lutheran” shirt (from the Old Lutheran website) at church events (he got photographed in it at a synod assembly).”

    Exactly.  That is the point and the problem.  People exist for whom the word “Christian” has to be printed on everything before they’ll buy it, because the non-Bible-version is somehow ungodly.  I have relatives like this.  Oddly enough, they tend to act less like Jesus than my other Christian relatives!  Funny how that works out.

    I think the irritating part is this: most Christians, as you said, use Bible-themed things as ways to spice up church youth meetings and the like.  But there’s that disturbing minority that uses Bible-themed games and Christianized logo shirts as a way of showing tribalism and withdrawing from the world.  That minority is basically using these items wrong–they tend to equate the use of Christian-brand merchandise with being Christian.  They’re trying to serve God and Mammon.

    The other point of the article is basically that a lot of evangelicals and ex-evangelicals grew up in a very isolated Christianized subculture, in which we only saw the saccharine, “Christian” versions of things.  I grew up in that culture, and I can tell you it isn’t healthy, or particularly Christian.

  • The_L1985

     I say, let them read Christian-themed stuff, but also talk to them from time to time about it.  Watch the VeggieTales video or whatever with your kids, then see what they have to say about it.

    Make sure that they understand that the maker of the video had more goals in mind than just making kids laugh.  Tell them that it’s OK to believe whatever you want to believe about gods and angels and all of that sort of thing, as long as your beliefs don’t cause harm to other people.

    I personally have copies of the Chronicles of Narnia series, and His Dark Materials.  I fully intend to talk to my kids about both, but I’m not going to let the fact that one is Christian and the other is anti-religious stop me from letting my kids see multiple viewpoints and think for themselves.

    If you only ever see one viewpoint, regardless of what that viewpoint is, you can’t think for yourself because you don’t know that there are other ways to think.  I know from my own experience.

  • The_L1985

     ”Should we save all the more disturbing stories for when they’re older?
    Or should we establish the lessons we see behind them first and
    incrementally introduce them to the violence?”

    We should definitely be careful, regardless.  Pretending that there isn’t anything violent or sexual in the Bible is, in effect, lying to your kids.  Letting them know that what you’re telling them is the “kids’ version” can help prepare them for the fact that the original isn’t quite PG-rated.

    (Meanwhile, I read Bulfinch at age 7.  Think back to the Greek mythology you know.  Now add Io, Phaeton, and Actaeon to the mix.  Again, I read them at age 7.)

    “That’s a valid criticism
    of the series, but also of a lot of children’s programming (the PBS show
    Wishbone whitewashed the heck out every piece of classical literature
    they covered).”

    Would you want a 5-year-old repeating Mercutio’s various dirty jokes when he’s not old enough to understand what they mean, though?  (I loved Wishbone, primarily because it compressed the “meat” of all these great works of literature into 30-minute TV shows.  I think it’s a great way to get kids interested in the originals.)

  • The_L1985

     Contains a Clinically Tested Ingredient!!

    We’re not going to tell you what the tests found out about it, though.

  • Ross Thompson

    Every time I see an ad say something was “clinically tested” I wonder if that phrase has any real meaning at all.

    http://xkcd.com/1096/

  • http://twitter.com/jclor jclor

    I, for one, believe there aren’t enough tacky gravestones.  There’s nothing worse than an austere, maudlin cemetery.  If someone was a goofball in life, I say, let ‘em remind us of their silliness after they’re gone.

    Then again, I come from a strange family.  My parents keep my brother’s ashes in a cookie jar shaped like a frog in a Santa suit.

  • http://jesustheram.blogspot.com/ Mr. Heartland

    Perry had better lay off the tanning bed if he wants to keep with the epic holy war talk.  People might get confused. 

  • http://jesustheram.blogspot.com/ Mr. Heartland

    No, and in fact never has.  Darwin himself spoke against using his theories to reinforce preexisting bigotries but it did nothing to stop people from trying. 

  • Carstonio

     My kids have read only the first book in the Narnia series, and they don’t know enough about the Bible to notice how, say, the sequence involving Aslan’s sacrifice is almost the Stations of the Cross. (The depiction of the White Witch’s jeering followers seemed like a vague slam at the Jews who “rejected” Christ.) I had misgivings initially that I didn’t voice to the kids, because the only people I knew who had read the series were hardcore fundamentalists. My kids haven’t shown any interest in the rest of the series, although they’ve devoured Harry Potter and are currently going through Lord of the Rings.

    When it comes to religion, we usually tell the kids that some people believe in X and that’s not what we believe, and both are OK as long as one isn’t pushing something on the other.  I agree about multiple viewpoints, and we don’t deliberately shield them from anything that’s religious in tone. Still, there’s a difference between a religious tone and a proselytizing tone or a tribalist tone. There are plenty of people in the world who will not give up until everyone joins their religions, or who turn religion into Us versus Them, and the world shouldn’t have to be like that. I’ve had experiences with my family of origin where they clearly didn’t respect my right to make my own life decisions, and anything that resembles proselytizing or religious tribalism feels the same way to me. Like if people really respected the individual’s right to hold a particular religious stance as long as it didn’t affect others, then they wouldn’t even have an opinion about that stance.

  • christopher_young


    Does the phrase “highly evolved” have a legitimate use in science these days?

    Pretty sure it doesn’t. Humans have been evolving for exactly as long as every other kind of animal that still exists. Sure, we’re quite fond of some of our unique adaptations, but I expect all the other species would be fond of some of theirs too, if they could think in those terms.

  • The_L1985

     Honestly, the only Narnia book that I find particularly problematic (so long as you talk to your kids) is The Last Battle.  Even as a kid, I saw a clear difference between Muslims and Calormenes, for example.  BTW, the Witch’s army mocking Aslan is supposed to be a direct analogy to the mockery of the officials who scourged Jesus.  It doesn’t have to be anti-Judaism-in-general. :)

    Just talk to your kids about whatever they read, and they’re not likely to go too far wrong.  And as you’ve noticed, they’re going to enjoy whatever books or movies they want instead of just watching/reading what you, specifically, expect them to read.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CUJHSQSQYTYT4DPZSKTVESYNQ B

     When I was a kid I always got bored in church.  When I was bored, I read.  When I was bored in church, I read the Bible because that’s the only thing my Mom would let me read in Church.

    Later she took a Bible study course that must have involved reading big chunks of the Bible and she commented to me, “I’d known some of the stuff that was in the Bible, maybe I wouldn’t have let you read it when you were a kid.” :-)

    (One of my favorite books was Leviticus.  I don’t know why — I gather many people find it boring — but all the things they considered unclean really interested me.  They sure didn’t like mildew back then, huh?)

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CUJHSQSQYTYT4DPZSKTVESYNQ B

     At the risk of starting an OT argument, I will make the idle observation that my understanding is that based on current science there’s no reason to think that HFCS is any worse for you than any other sugar, and (if you’re worried about fructose) better than some of the “natural” alternatives like agave nectar and concentrated fruit juice.  :-)

    (E.g. an interesting blog post on this topic here: http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/index.php/high-fructose-corn-syrup/ )

    Now, HFCS is bad for you because it’s sugar, but there appears to be no reason to think it’s worse than any other sugar except to the extent that its cheapness means it can be stuck into basically everything.

  • SisterCoyote

     I hate the 5 Hour Energy commercials so, so, so very much. “Caffeine? Sugar? Guarana? Tsk tsk. Yeah, except that guarana is just a caffeine-containing fruit, much like, oh, I don’t know, coffee. “No crash*!” *and-by-no-crash-we-mean-no-sugar-crash-you’ll-still-crash-from-the-rest-of-it.

    Shut up, 5 Hour Energy.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jrandyowens Randy Owens

    Am I missing something?  Does the phrase “highly evolved” have a legitimate use in science these days?

    Yes, in the science of studying TV Tropes:
    Evolutionary Levels
    Goal-Oriented Evolution

    Outside of that?  Absolutely not, as those articles make clear.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jrandyowens Randy Owens

     The one that’s been on my mind lately is “part of this complete nutritious breakfast.”  Who’s the marketing genius who came up with that one, and how did it come to be so consistently echoed in everyone’s advertising?  Hell, I could call my usual glass of Dr Pepper (complete with plenty of HFCS, sadly) “part of a complete nutritious breakfast,” as long as everything else added up.

  • Worthless Beast

    Ever see documentaries or travel shows that features that church in Prague made of bones?  Decorated all over the place with bones?  – Something like that is what I’d like to have done with me, if it didn’t upset my family, which it probably would.

    I’ve had two people express to me that if they die before I do that they want me to paint their skulls.  (I make art with naturally-fallen animal remains, legally obtained).  I told them both that I “don’t work with humans, sorry.” 

    There’s tacky, then theres’ bizarre. I prefer bizarre. XD.  As long as your brother would have enjoyed being in a cookie jar, more power to your family. Cute.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I just found the Last Battle to be depressing, really. I keep wondering why I never replace it, then I re-read it, and I realize why. It’s just not a really uplifting book.

  • Vermic

    Sure, we’re quite fond of some of our unique adaptations, but I expect all the other species would be fond of some of theirs too, if they could think in those terms.

    I remember an Isaac Asimov story in which a character comments that humans consider intelligence the ultimate survival trait, because we have it.  If you were to ask Tyrannosaurus Rex what was most important, he’d say size and strength:  “And he’d make a better case for it.  He lasted a lot longer than we’re likely to.”

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

     I have heard (and this is probably apocryphal) that the rather ludicrous commercial for “Head-On” was the result of an issue where they were forced to cut all the false or unsupportable claims they’d wanted to make about the product, and with what was left,  their only choice to fill out the twenty seconds was to simply shout “Head On! Apply Directly to the Forehead!” over and over.

    (For the uninitiated, “Head-On” was a homeopathic topical headache “remedy”.  As it is scientifically impossible for such a thing to work, in about three different ways, they could not actually make any claims about it working  under truth-in-advertising laws)

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CUJHSQSQYTYT4DPZSKTVESYNQ B

     I always say intelligence is over-rated.  After all, I work all day to support myself and my cats, who laze around my apartment all day enjoying free shelter, food, petting, toys, and health care.  Sometimes being cute and prolific is all you need. :-)

    Then there’s Michal Pollen’s observation that humans are just pawns in corn’s plot for world domination.  If you’re yummy enough, you don’t need a brain at all — the intelligent primates will do all the work for you.

  • EllieMurasaki

    One of my favorite books was Leviticus. I don’t know why — I gather many people find it boring — but all the things they considered unclean really interested me. They sure didn’t like mildew back then, huh?
    Who likes mildew now?

  • LoneWolf343

     I thought it was the FDA…in fact, I thought I mentioned that. Ah, well.

  • Alicia

    Far-left liberals bent on destroying the very foundations of our society, that’s who? God made Adam and Steve, not Adam and Cladosporum! 

  • LoneWolf343

     Religious belief is supposed to be intellectual, not emotional or an other kind of essential attribute. Religious beliefs aren’t who you are, it’s what you think is right. One would think that religious beliefs would stem naturally from the essential person, but they don’t.