Climate change is both a hoax and a sign of the End Times

Susie Madrak tells us about Sen. James Inhofe’s latest climate-change-denial press conference. This time the Oklahoma Republican brought along some friends, including an unhinged British Lord, Christopher Monckton, and Cathie Adams, President of the Texas Eagle Forum.

Adams, also a former chair of the Texas GOP, believes that climate change is part of the Antichrist’s plot to create one world government.

Yes, really. If that seems like it’s something right out of the Left Behind novels, that’s because it comes right out of the Left Behind novels.

But even though Adams is a devout disciple of Tim LaHaye’s Bircher eschatology, she doesn’t quite seem to understand it. In a 1999 newsletter, Adams wrote:

The Bible tells us that in the end times there will be a world government headed by a world leader, called the anti-Christ, who will profess a world religion, but did you ever think you would live in the day when these things would come into being? That is exactly what the United Nations is doing behind the backs of most Americans.

That’s all boilerplate “Bible prophecy” lingo, except for that weird rhetorical question — “did you ever think you would live in the day when these things would come into being?”

That’s the whole point of this “Bible prophecy” nonsense, to believe that this generation uniquely lives in the day when these things are coming into being. There has never been a single “prophecy” preacher or Rapture enthusiast who taught that this was a prophecy for some distant future generation.

Darby was certain the Rapture would happen in his lifetime. Scofield and Ironside were certain the Rapture  would happen in their lifetime. And when Hal Lindsey and Tim LaHaye first started writing about the Rapture, neither one of them said there was any chance at all that they and the world would still be around to be talking about it in 2012.

These folks insist that the Rapture and the End of the World are prophesied to occur in our lifetime. That’s what makes us special. It means that the Bible was written mainly for and about us — for and about the 20th 21st-century white Americans in whose special lifetimes these prophecies were ordained by God to occur. John of Patmos wasn’t really writing to the seven first-century churches he names in the book of Revelation — he was writing to us, and really only to us.

In their view, the Bible is mainly about prophecy. And that prophecy is mainly about events expected to occur in our lifetimes. That makes us God’s most-special special-est people of all.

Even more special than that, actually, because as students of the secrets of Bible prophecy, we alone are the enlightened ones who possess the Gnostic truths of the initiates.

That’s the appeal of the whole bizarre realm of LaHaye-style “Bible prophecy.” And that’s why more than a third of Americans find it appealing, as a Public Religion Research Institute poll released yesterday shows:

More than a third of Americans believe the severity of recent natural disasters is evidence that we are in the “end times” described in the New Testament — a period of turmoil preceding Jesus’ Second Coming and the end of the world.

“There is a significant proportion of Americans who see these phenomena through a theological lens,” said Daniel Cox, research director at the Public Religion Research Institute, which released a poll on religion and climate change on Thursday (Dec. 13) in partnership with Religion News Service.

“It’s hardly a fringe belief. It’s nearly four in 10 Americans who are embracing this,” Cox said.

The conviction is particularly strong among white evangelical Protestants (65 percent).

So two-thirds of white evangelical Americans believe that they’re living in the most-special special-est times of God’s most-special special-est people.

This view helps to explain white evangelical support for Inhofe’s climate denialism and for his party’s climate do-nothing-ism. These folks believe that God is bringing about the end of the world, and that efforts to address the disasters coming from climate change are part of the Antichrist’s Satanic plot.

But don’t worry, that’s just a “fringe” belief. Only 65 percent of white evangelicals think this way.

* * * * * * * * *

Cathie Adams’ Texas Eagle Forum is part of the national Eagle Forum, founded and still led by Phyllis Schlafly.

Her son Roger is now a prominent spokesman for the group. Here (via Brian Tashman) is Roger Schlafly writing about the recent election at the Eagle Forum Blog:

America was founded by WASPs — White Anglo-Saxon Protestants. They had nuclear families, attended church, and believed in the Protestant work ethic. Republicans are seen as believing in traditional American values.

Democrats campaign largely by badmouthing traditional American values, and convincing various demographic groups that they are outside the Republican base, and hence better off voting Democrat. So non-whites, non-Christians, and non-marrieds vote Democrat out of group identifications. That is, they see it as being in their group interests to tear down traditional American culture.

Democrats never persuade voters based on reason or logic. They gain voters by increasing government dependence and by promoting changes to immigration policy. …

But please, please don’t accuse him of being a bigot. And please don’t infer from those words that the righteous, godly white evangelicals of the Eagle Forum are any sort of racists.

After all, Schlafly is not saying that he hates “non-whites” and “non-Christians.” He’s just saying that they’re inferior, dependent parasites who are destroying white America.

But again, that’s just a fringe opinion.

  • JustoneK

    “America was founded by WASPs — White Anglo-Saxon Protestants. They had nuclear families, attended church, and believed in the Protestant work ethic.”
    I’ll be over here, laughing.

  • Launcifer

    I was actually going to say something snarky about that delightful sentence a few minutes ago, but there are so very many things wrong with it I’ve decided to make an early start on the Christmas wrapping while I calm down.

    And possibly unlearn all of the history and basic flippin’ English I’ve learned over the past thirty years, just in case it makes more sense afterwards.

  • JustoneK

    Reality zoomed past the snarky exaggerations some time back.  The Onion now reports on real news situations.  http://www.theonion.com/articles/man-who-will-die-in-great-eastern-seaboard-flood-o,30726/

  • VMink

    One bad thing amongst many bad things is that Roger Schlaefly and his mother Phillys, and Senator Inhofe, will all be dead and buried when we see results of global climate change in such a way that not even they could deny it.  

  • Magic_Cracker

    Climate change is both a hoax and a sign of the End Times

    Sorta like how neo-Nazis wish the Holocaust had happened.

    America was founded by WASPs — White Anglo-Saxon Protestants …
     So … non-Christians … vote Democrat out of group identifications. 

    See what he did there? Protestant = Christian. No others need apply. (And, of course, this history of Protestantism in Europe and the U.S. is one of perfect comity and harmony, which is why Rhode Island the Narragansett Free State was never colonized.)

  • rrhersh

    “But please, please don’t accuse him of being a bigot.”

    My local government is considering an English only law.  One of the local politicians pushing it recently had an op ed in the local paper, in which he complained that some people were suggesting the proposal was bigoted.  He considers such talk outside the bounds of civil discourse.  Actually *being* bigoted and acting on one’s bigotry is fine, of course.

  • Becca Stareyes

    Ah, don’t forget that the nuclear family is a pretty new concept.  Americans in the late 1700s were far more likely to rely on an extended family, rather than just the ‘mom, dad and the kids’.  

    Well, except for the ones white settlers brought over as slaves and regularly tore their attempts at families apart.  Way to dismiss folks of African descent’s role as part of the history of our country.  

    Also not mentioned: Catholics, Jews, deists*, Native Americans, the Spanish-descended settlers of the southwest, the French-descended folks who lived in Louisiana well before America bought it…

    America: never was the magical land of WASPy WASPishness where no one else mattered, as much as some people like to pretend it was.  

    * It was pretty hip in the Enlightenment to be a deist.  All the cool scholars were doing it.  

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FRDTPMBW7IBKWIU3763AI6FYOM Steve

    Let’s not forget the wilderness of Maryland, since catholics never came here.  I’m betting Quakers didn’t show up either, protestant though they may technically be…

  • Eamon Knight

    Roger and his brother Andy showed up on talk.origins about 15 years back, when I was a regular. It was a remarkable display of dumb & dumber (with Andy being the latter — not surprising that he went on to start Conservapedia).

  • Loki100

    It’s almost hilarious the complete lack of self-awareness involved in that Eagle Forum blog post.

  • AnonaMiss

    I always thought the W in WASP stood for Wealthy. White Anglo-Saxon is kind of redundant, isn’t it? Or was the term coined at a time when not even all Anglo-Saxons were considered white?

    It can’t even have been tacked on to make the acronym work, because ASP is a perfectly acceptable acronym in itself. And it’s not like wasps have a considerably better reputation than asps.

  • Magic_Cracker

    I’m betting Quakers didn’t show up either

    Good point. The protested the Protestants, which makes them crypto-Catholic, and in any case to this day Pennsylvania the Shawnee Confederation is mostly peak forest  and un-mined mountains.

  • Morilore

    Democrats never persuade voters based on reason or logic.

    “Reason” and “logic”?  I thought your catchwords were “faith and morals” or something like that?  Please get the flavor of your own oppressive hegemonic ideology straight.

    EDIT: Also, “non-marrieds?” Really? Is this the 1950s?

  • Magic_Cracker

    “Reason and logic,” “faith and morals,” same things. Words mean exactly what Conservagelicals say they mean. No more. No less.

  • Nangleator

    Is this like Obama being a devotee of Reverend Wright, and a Muslim?  And an atheist?

  • Carstonio

    These folks make Interior Secretary James Watt seem like a moderate. He once said that “I do not know how many future generations we can count on before the Lord returns, whatever it is we have to manage with a skill to leave the resources needed for future generations.” Despite his record of letting companies exploit whatever land they could, even he didn’t publicly connect this to dispensationalism.

  • Magic_Cracker

    Don’t forget gay married in accordance with Sharia Law.

  • fraser

     The book Sexual Revolution in Early America points out that lots of average Americans in the 1600s and early 1700s had little use for traditional marriage. They considered themselves married regardless of whether they had a ceremony (or anything but a folk ceremony), divorced if they decided it wasn’t working out. Church and state got very frustrated.

  • ReverendRef

    And in much more important news, Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, CT has just experienced a mass shooting.

    http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2012/12/14/shooting-reported-at-connecticut-elementary-school/?hpt=hp_t1

    Please pray for the victims and survivors . . . or whatever it is you do in times like this.

  • fraser

     Good point. I think it’s meant to emphasize that they’re both–White, the highest of all known races; and Anglo-Saxon, the highest of the white races (in contrast to the substandard Germans, Poles, Irish, Italians, etc.).

  • Magic_Cracker

    What’s this Anglo-Saxon bullshit? You’re either Angle or you’re Saxon. And don’t get me started on the Jutes.

  • fraser

    There is a continued morbid fascination watching them struggle to rationalize why so many non-whites, non-Christians and women don’t vote Republican. Instapundit suggested this week that obviously women’s lifestyle magazines are using leftwing propaganda to subtly brainwash women who are too ignorant of politics to realize Republicans Are Their Friends.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Oh dear. :(

  • http://www.facebook.com/mdhpiper Merwyn Haskett

    I never knew the definition of Nuclear Family was having tons of kids until there were enough survivors to work the farm. But I guess after a nuclear holocaust such a thing might be necessary, if the radiation doesn’t interfere.

  • Deborah Moore

    The Schlaflys are German Catholics.  Does that mean they aren’t Authentic Real Americans like the Founding Fathers intended?

  • JustoneK

    That phrasing just reminds me of Friend Computer and I get very very paranoid.

  • Kadh2000

     It’s horrifying.  I will pray for them.

    How many times do we have to let this happen before we do something about gun control?

  • Vermic

    The earth is warming, but the cause is not climate change, it’s that Hell is rising closer to the surface because God’s mad about gay marriage.

    This is a joke and not an opinion I have heard from any actual people.  But, really, it’s just a matter of time.

  • Magic_Cracker

    They get a pass because Germany is where the Angles and Saxons came from. 

  • Magic_Cracker

    And I mean “get a pass” literally. PAPERS, PLEASE, YE PAPISTS!

  • heckblazer

    Angles and Saxons only came from part of Germany.  All the other bits were full of stupid brown people, as Ben Franklin could tell you.

  • Lunch Meat

    So non-whites, non-Christians, and non-marrieds vote Democrat out of
    group identifications. That is, they see it as being in their group
    interests to tear down traditional American culture.

    Right, so I, a white Christian straight married Democrat who works hard and is not currently dependent on government, do not exist? Good to know. *disappears in a puff of logic.*

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    But please, please don’t accuse him of being a bigot. And please don’t infer from those words that the righteous, godly white evangelicals of the Eagle Forum are any sort of racists.

    After all, Schlafly is not saying that he hates “non-whites” and “non-Christians.” He’s just saying that they’re inferior, dependent parasites who are destroying white America.

    But again, that’s just a fringe opinion.

    I have said before that a part of this issue has been that some people mistakenly conflate things like racism, sexism, or homophobia with emotional states.  They think that they do not “hate”  non-white and non-Christian, so therefor it cannot be racism.  

    Hatred may be what drives someone to racism or the like, but it is not the hatred of a particular group that is the racism itself.  Racism is a system of which disenfranchisement is an ultimate effect, not a cause unto itself.  Because they conflate hatred with racism, they think that by distancing themselves from hate they inoculate themselves against racism.  

    Unfortunately for them, bigotry does not work that way.

  • atalex

    There is a reason why I consider Republicans and Evangelical Christians (but I repeat myself) to both be Satanic death cults and the enemies of the entire human race.

  • http://www.facebook.com/cphlewis Chloe P. H. Lewis

    “Americans in the late 1700s were far more likely to rely on an extended family”

    … and indentured servants, who often had to run away to get their try at the dream of independence, even if they were WASPy WASPs themselves. Plenty of orphans put out to clap cr0ws in ethnically homogeneous villages, probably for eons.

  • Foreigner

    I haven’t the slightest doubt that someone has already said that President Obama has had the latest school shooting staged so he can introduce gun controls. No, I’m not going to Google for it; finding it would be too depressing.

    My American friends, you live in a troubled country.

  • LL

    Ugh … Inhofe. What an asshole. And people in Oklahoma love him. I don’t know by what percentage he won the last time he was elected, but I bet it was about 60 percent (ie, 60 percent of the voters). 

  • Tricksterson

    To be fair Native Americans didn’t help found the USA, the were stomped on as part of the process of founding it.  The other groups both helped found it and got treated like shit in the process

  • rizzo

    Oh yes…I’m an avowed anti-joiner yet I voted for Obama out of group identity ok.  Honestly, I’m not enamored with Obama, but when the other option is balls crazy he looks much better.

  • ohiolibrarian

    What does Inhofe think about the Dust Bowl? Does he deny that was caused by humans, too?

  • Joshua

    As someone who comes from Virginia, this talk about founding by Protestants with the Protestant work-ethic riles me up. Because that implies that the first (English) colony was in Plymouth. Which it wasn’t. The first English colony was Roanoke, which died out for reasons still unknown, and the first one to last was Jamestown. Which was founded primarily by people locked out of family inheritance due to not being the oldest child and nearly caused the colony to collapse due to sheer unwillingness and incompetence at actually doing the necessary work to keep it going.

    Of course, why let facts get in the way of your argument?

  • Kubricks_Rube

    Democrats campaign largely by … convincing various demographic groups that they are outside the Republican base

    …by playing clips of the GOP nominee saying things like, “I’ll never convince them that they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives” and calling access to healthcare a “gift.”

    So non-whites, non-Christians, and non-marrieds vote Democrat out of group identifications.

    Right, it’s not the party with 88% of its votes coming from one demographic that has a “group identification” problem.

  • Tricksterson

    Will Eisner’s Dropsie Avenue which is about thelife cycle of a Bronx neighborhood, begins with a Dutch family complaining about the English intruders.

  • Tricksterson

    But your not a bigot.

  • Tricksterson

    How dare these groups vote Democratic because the believe the Democrats are offering them a better deal!  That’s cheating!

  • Vermic

    Honestly, I’m not enamored with Obama, but when the other option is balls crazy he looks much better.

    Yes, Roger Schlafly and others on the right throw out all sorts of theories about why Americans didn’t get enthusiastic about Romney (e.g. Obama promised them free stuff!), conveniently forgetting that back in the primaries, Romney was the guy even other Republicans weren’t enthusiastic about until there was literally no other option, thanks to every other candidate proving themselves an utter cretin.

  • http://dpolicar.livejournal.com/ Dave

     

    Right, it’s not the party with 88% of its votes coming from one demographic that has a “group identification” problem.

    I sometimes find it helpful (albeit infuriating) to remember that many people who assert this sort of thing genuinely don’t think of straight white Americans as a demographic. Because, you know, straight white Americans are just normal people. It’s the rest of us who are demographics.

  • vsm

    Oh wow, Ben Franklin didn’t think Swedes were white enough.

  • heckblazer

    My father’s family is descended from those very same Germans Franklin was complaining about.  My mother’s family is from Russia, also identified by him as a swarthy nation.  Despite what Franklin might expect given my ancestry, I am one of the whitest people you’ll ever meet (e.g.  I blind people when I take off my shirt at the beach, and when I was a kid strangers asked in earnest if I was an albino).

  • Turcano

     Well, you see, he was going to a radical church as a cover for his nefarious activities,and the atheism is canceled out by the fact that he’s not just a Muslim, but a double Muslim.  It all makes sense, because shut up, that’s why.


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