Sunday salmagundi

• So all those open refrigerators in the produce, meat and dairy sections of the supermarket — isn’t that kind of wasteful? What do you suppose that costs?

Well, for one supermarket chain, it turns out it cost about $80 million a year.

• In the recent “fiscal cliff” budget deal, Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell, who represents Wendell Berry’s home state, fought for and secured deep cuts to programs for small farmers, minority farmers, and environmental protection in farm country.

So, basically, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky just said, “Screw you, Wendell Berry. Screw you and everything you stand for.”

The values of Mr. Wendell Berry of Kentucky do not seem to be appreciated by his senator, Republican Mitch McConnell.

• ”Keep them active” vs. “Show them off.” Grrr. (Related: Rugby season is coming up.)

• After posting about that Barna survey on temptation and respondents unwillingness to admit to anything serious, I remembered an old line of Tony Campolo’s on that subject. “If you knew all about the sin in my life, you’d never have invited me to come speak at your church,” he would say. And then, “But don’t get cocky. If I knew all about the sin in your life, I’d never have agreed to come here to speak to you.”

• We used to call this “payola”: Richard Armey explains how FreedomWorks funneled corporate money to Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck to get them to say nice things about the tea party. The news there is not that Limbaugh and Beck are corrupt figures paid to say whatever corporate lobbyists tell them to say. The news is that now, in one instance, we have more precise figures as to exactly how much Limbaugh and Beck’s “opinions” cost.

Bonus fun fact: Former FreedomWorks boss Armey says he was too candid and “chatty” in his interview with liberal watchdog Media Matters because he got them confused with the right-wing Media Research Center, run by Brent Bozell, or, as Armey calls him “the guy with the red beard that always does the show where he points out how biased the press is.”

• This prediction of “What Twitter will look like on the day that Margaret Thatcher dies” is pretty funny. Probably also pretty accurate. And a pretty good excuse for posting a link to an Elvis Costello’s classic on “the subtle difference between justice and contempt.”

• This is here, somewhere in Chester County, Pa. The article is cagey about precisely where, though, so I guess I’ll have to wait to be invited to the homeowner’s eleventy-first birthday celebration to get a closer look. (via Jay Lake)

• Another round of this game: Where’s Ms. Rosenberg?

• I’m still digging through lots of year-in-review type articles. This one I especially like — Connor Simpson curates the year’s best stories from The Onion.

 

  • Turcano

    At first I was skeptical about the size of the slice of people mourning Thatcher’s death, but then I remember how people acted when Reagan died.

  • Lori

    My question is about the slice of people who “should” be mourning Thatcher’s death, but are instead searching for outrage. I know what he means, but my brain rebels at the notion that anyone who is not family or a close friend “should” mourn Thatcher.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    And remember when Richard Nixon died? Bill Clinton, of all people, praised him. O.o

  • http://profiles.google.com/marc.k.mielke Marc Mielke

    The mere mention of Thatcher’s death got a specific song from “The Wizard of Oz” stuck in my head. 

  • EllieMurasaki

    That isn’t fair to Elphaba.

  • MikeJ

    On Friday for the songs mentioning the names of famous people, I had four in my itunes about Thatcher with her name in the title. One calling for her resignation, two promising to celebrate her death, and one calling for her beheading. 

  • caryjamesbond
  • http://profiles.google.com/marc.k.mielke Marc Mielke
  • reynard61

    “In the recent ‘fiscal cliff’ budget deal, Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell, who represents Wendell Berry’s home state, fought for and secured deep cuts to programs for small farmers, minority farmers, and environmental protection in farm country.

    “So, basically, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky just said, ‘Screw you, Wendell Berry. Screw you and everything you stand for.’”

    And I’d be willing to bet real money that Mr. Berry and the vast majority of his fellow farmers will vote McConnell *back* into office in the next election because they firmly believe that he’s a decent, conservative guy who shares their values and will fight for their best interests against those Latte-sipping, Volvo-driving East Coast Liberal Elitists — even in the face of this evidence to the contrary, because their ideology is more important to them than reality. 

  • DorothyD

    Nessarose, actually. Technically, the witch which was dead was The Wicked Witch of the East. Sister to the Wicked Witch of the West (in the movie, that is, but not in the Baum books). So that would be Nessie in Gregory Maguire’s book who is killed when Dorothy’s house falls on her. 

    No singing Munchkin’s in that version, though, IIRC. But I’ve only read the book, not seen the musical. 

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

     No, most  everybody in this state loathes McConnell. 

    The reason that he keeps getting reelected is that the Dems refuse to run anyone against him that isn’t a Republican in Dem clothing, and when given the choice between two Republicans people choose the real one every time.  Especially when they feel that the real one comes with the institutional privilege of having the the Senate Leader be from your state. 

  • Emma

    Come on. They have to like him at least a little bit or they’d get rid of him there, even if they just want another Republican, right?

  • Carstonio

    Perhaps Clinton feared setting a precedent, with a future President eulogizing him by talking about his own impeachment. Matt Groening named one of his characters after Nixon and showed no such reluctance in his own eulogizing, saying that the disgraced president should have gone to prison.

  • Carstonio

     I had the impression that Thatcher was even more reactionary than Reagan. The Falkland Islands and Grenada together seemed like similar types of international bullying. Was Thatcher as PM as anti-government as a modern US tea partyer?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    This was in 1994, years before Monica Lewinsky was even a blip on the right-wing froth machine radar.

  • P J Evans

     The other guy might beworse.

  • Jim Roberts

    I honestly don’t get the “Where’s Willow?” Game. I mean, Dru, Darla and Cordelia aren’t on that shirt either.

    And look at the guys of Joss Whedon shirt on the same site – it’s pretty clear that they’re choosing their images based on perceived popularity and little else.

  • Carstonio

    I mean that if Clinton talked about Watergate in eulogizing Nixon, then a future president might feel justified in talking about Lewinsky in eulogizing Clinton.

  • reynard61

    “No, most  everybody in this state loathes McConnell.

    “The reason that he keeps getting reelected is that the Dems refuse to run anyone against him that isn’t a Republican in Dem clothing, and when given the choice between two Republicans people choose the real one every time.” 

    Admittedly my perspective is that of an outsider looking in. (I live in Indiana, which shares it’s Southern border with Kentucky.) But I hear enough about Kentucky politics on the local news to get the impression that Ideology has become as much of a tribal marker among Kentucky’s Republican voters as Religion is; and McConnell is apparently the “Keeper of the Republican Flame”, as it were, among the Tribe.

    “Especially when they feel that the real one comes with the institutional privilege of having the the Senate Leader be from your state.”

    With Great Power comes a greater chance for re-election…

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    No, nobody likes him.  They just like the privilege of being represented by the #3 Republican(Now #1) in the country. 

    Nobody who runs against him wants to do anything different, and they don’t get the added bonus of the power McConnell has from decades entrenched in power.  For Republicans and most Democrats, it’s a no brainer.

  • reynard61

    “Nobody who runs against him wants to do anything different, and they don’t get the added bonus of the power McConnell has from decades entrenched in power.”

    Then I guess that it’s going to come as quite a shock when he shuffles off this mortal coil. (He ain’t exactly a Spring chicken, y’know!) They’re either going to have to turn him into an animatronic puppet, zombify him, or reconcile themselves to the reality of losing that political power — and they don’t strike me as the type to embraceaccept reality any time soon…

  • Turcano

    Grenada I’ll give you, but the Falklands War was much more justifiable.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

     Yeah. I find myself inexplicably humming “We represent the lollypop guild” too.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Better to be remembered as a philanderer than as a crook.

    At least Bill Clinton didn’t use his office for political intimidation or to abuse his enemies.

  • Carstonio

    I don’t know if Bill sees it that way, but I agree with you. He did break the law by lying under oath, but that’s not even remotely comparable to the abuses of power by Nixon and his cronies.

  • stardreamer42

    Who’s the redhead on the far left of the shirt? (You have to click on the image to see this one — she’s cut off in the background shot.) 

  • Consumer Unit 5012

     Clinton may have praised Nixon, but Hunter S. Thompson didn’t.


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