NRA: God Bless You, Dr. Rosenzweig

Nicolae: The Rise of Antichrist; pp. 139-141

Buck Williams and his charter pilot land safely inside of one of the contradictions in Tim LaHaye’s “Bible prophecy.”

“Don’t worry about me, buddy boy,” Ken Ritz told Buck as he helped him off the Learjet. “I’ll hangar this baby and find a place to crash for a few days. I’ve always wanted to tour this country, and it’s nice to be in a place that hasn’t been blown to bits.”

LaHaye’s prophecy scheme tells us that after the Rapture of all real, true Christians, the Great Tribulation begins. During this final seven-year period, the Antichrist will rule over the world as the all-powerful dictator of an all-encompassing one-world government.

LaHaye’s prophecy also tells us that the first thing this Antichrist will do as head of the OWG is sign a peace treaty with the nation of Israel.

See the problem here? LaHaye doesn’t. He’s told us that the Antichrist will rule over every single nation on Earth, sweeping aside all former national boundaries and sovereignties to create a single, global empire.

Except somehow Israel isn’t included. So the Antichrist’s global empire is apparently like the old Los Angeles Country Club.

Nicolae Carpathia’s not-quite global one-world government (gray).

This is the sort of problem that comes from taking a bunch of verses from Daniel and a bunch of verses from Revelation and pretending they’re all about the same thing — a prediction of a future empire that has nothing to do with the Seleucid or Roman contexts that the authors of those books were writing about.

LaHaye’s strategy for dealing with this contradiction is to ignore it and hope no one notices. That means poor Jerry Jenkins has to ignore it too in his attempt to type up a fictional depiction of the fulfillment of these “prophecies.”

Jenkins slips up a bit here, shining a spotlight on this contradiction with Ken Ritz’s comment that “it’s nice to be in a place that hasn’t been blown to bits.” At this point in the story, the Antichrist has been wantonly bombing major cities throughout his OWG — destroying London, New York, Washington, Chicago, Dallas, Toronto, Mexico City, Cairo, etc., and raining death down on millions of his subjects. Israel thus becomes the only safe haven in the world. The place ought to be swarming with refugees.

But then, inexplicably, Nicolae Carpathia’s sudden war against his own empire hasn’t produced any refugees anywhere. Buck and Ken began their journey in Milwaukee — a city one would expect to have been flooded by refugees from the war zone in Chicago. Yet the nuclear destruction of Chicago doesn’t seem to have altered the daily routine of life in Milwaukee at all. The destruction of O’Hare International Airport in Chicago didn’t even disrupt flight schedules in or out of Milwaukee.

The destruction of Chicago doesn’t seem to have resulted in refugees even in Cicero or Evanston or Oak Lawn or any of the other adjoining cities and towns — all of which are miraculously unscathed and unperturbed.

Pause to think about things like that for too long and you’ll never be able to keep reading. It’s too huge. The whole story — and the whole alleged “prophecy” depicted by the story — collapses under the weight of such vast, weird impossibilities. So let’s not pause too long. Let’s just say again, quickly, “Just go with it” and race ahead to the next bit.

Unfortunately, Jerry Jenkins isn’t going to allow us to race ahead just yet. The rest of this chapter turns out to be a review of prophecy/plot points from the first two books.

Buck thanked him and grabbed his bag, slinging it over his shoulder. He headed toward the terminal. There, beyond the plate-glass window, he saw the enthusiastic wave of the wispy little old man with the flyaway hair, Chaim Rosenzweig. How he wanted this man to become a believer! Buck had come to love Chaim. That was not an expression he would have used about the other man back when he first met the scientist. It had been only a few years, but it seemed so long ago.

This is where, if this were a 1980s TV series, the screen would go all wavy and we’d hear Buck in voice-over saying, dreamily, “I remember it like it was yesterday …” The two-fold purpose of the next seven pages is the same as those old TV flashbacks: 1) To remind viewers/readers of what happened previously in the series, and 2) To cut expense/effort by recycling old clips instead of filming/writing new material.

Buck had been the youngest senior writer in the history of Global Weekly — in fact, in the history of international journalism. He had unabashedly campaigned for the job of profiling Dr. Rosenzweig as the Weekly’s “Man of the Year.”

I feel a little sorry for Buck here, congratulating himself on his “historic” designation as a senior writer. What this designation actually meant was that Stanton Bailey realized he could save some overtime expense by switching Buck from an hourly employee to an exempt, salaried staff-member. Bailey guessed, correctly, that this little ladder-climber would be so intoxicated by the new title that he wouldn’t even realize it meant longer hours for less pay. “Good news, Williams! We’re making you a senior writer — the youngest senior writer the magazine has ever had.” The kid bought it hook, line and sinker.

Buck had first met the man a little more than a year before that assignment, after Rosenzweig had won a huge international prize for his invention (Chaim himself always called it more of a discovery) of a botanic formula. Rosenzweig’s concoction, some said without much exaggeration, allowed flora to grow anywhere — even on concrete.

The latter had never been proven; however, the desert sands of Israel soon began to blossom like a greenhouse. Flowers, corn, beans, you name it, every spare inch of the tiny nation was quickly cleared for agriculture. Overnight, Israel had become the richest nation in the world.

We covered this back in the first chapter of the first book — the strangeness of imagining that agriculture was the path to becoming “the richest nation in the world” (see “Weird Science” — from October of omigod 2003). Among the many things Jenkins hasn’t considered here is the difference between growing, say, corn, and growing “flowers.” He seems to assume that everything can be harvested by machine — like in that retrofuturist robot-farm diorama in Disney’s World of Tomorrow. That overlooks the vast army of farmworkers this plan would require to harvest things like flowers, tomatoes, strawberries, etc.

Although Israel’s sudden, massive need for such labor might help to account for another puzzling, impossible-seeming assertion from this section back in the first book, the authors’ matter-of-fact, unexplained and unsupported statement that:

The prosperity brought about by the miracle formula changed the course of history for Israel. Flush with cash and resources, Israel made peace with her neighbors.

And by “made peace with,” the authors actually mean “annexed and absorbed,” since we’re told that — thanks entirely to Rosenzweig’s miracle formula — the nation of Israel has expanded to include what in the actual world is the West Bank, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon and parts of Iraq.

The unreality of this whole bit regarding Chaim Rosenzweig’s miracle formula comes from the backwards process of Jenkins’ project here. He’s not trying to tell a story, but to depict the fulfillment of a prophecy. Thus instead of asking the storyteller’s question — “What happens next?” — he starts with that answer and works backwards.

This miracle formula is a potentially interesting idea. A capable science fiction writer could start with that idea and extrapolate the kind of new world that would develop from such a premise — complete with the conflicts, and thus the stories, that this new world would bring. But that’s not how Jenkins approaches any of this. He’s starting with a bunch of texts describing prosperity in an ancient, agrarian society, and treats those texts as predictive prophecies about the future. He’s not at all curious about imagining the ramifications of Rosenzweig’s formula, or how such a thing would change and reshape the actual world. He just wants to check off another box on LaHaye’s prophecy check list.

“Desert blooms.” Check. “Magog” and Ethiopia invade without effect. Check.

That second one is pieced together from bits of Ezekiel. This is inserted into the “prophecy” from Revelation based on the dispensationalist hermeneutic principle of “Hey, what the heck, why not throw in something from Ezekiel?”

The book of Ezekiel’s reference to “Magog” is a bit obscure, but since it’s said to be north of Israel, and since it begins with an M, “Bible prophecy scholars” during the Cold War decided it meant Moscow — about which more in a moment.

Other nations had been jealous to get hold of the formula. Clearly, this was the answer to any economic woes. Israel had gone from vulnerable, geographically defenseless country to a world power — respected, feared, envied.

Respected, feared and envied seem to be presented there as synonyms. Or perhaps “feared” and “envied” are presented as the authors’ definition of what it means to be “respected.” This is helpful for understanding Tim LaHaye’s political ideology. And probably also for understanding his idea of pastoral leadership.

Other nations wanted Rosenzweig’s formula so badly that they assigned high-level diplomats and politicians to court him. He acceded to audiences from so many dignitaries that his life’s work had to be set aside. He was past retirement age anyway, but clearly here was a man more comfortable in a laboratory or a classroom than in a diplomatic setting. The darling of Israel had become the icon of world governments, and they all came calling.

Chaim had told Buck at one point that each suitor had his own not-so-hidden agenda. “I did my best to remain calm and diplomatic,” he told Buck, “but only because I was representing my mother country. I grew almost physically ill,” he added with his charming Hebrew-accented dialect, “when each began trying to persuade me that I would personally become the wealthiest man in the world if I would condescend to rent them my formula.”

That’s an odd use of “condescend” there, ignoring the usual negative connotations of hauteur associated with the word. We usually think of someone being “condescending” when they presume a kind of intrinsic superiority for themselves and thus an equivalent inferiority for others. Like, for example, when an American writer describes an Israeli character as speaking in a “charming Hebrew-accented dialect.”

The Israeli government was even more protective of the formula. They made it so clear that the formula was not for sale or rent that other countries threatened war over it, and Russia actually attacked. Buck had been in Haifa the night the warplanes came screaming in.

But if you remember the scene from back in the first book, it wasn’t only Russia that attacked. As per the arbitrarily chosen “prophecy” of Ezekiel 38, Gog and Magog are not acting alone: “Persia, Ethiopia and Put are with them.” So LaHaye’s prophecy, duly depicted by Jenkins, gives us a Russian-Ethiopian joint attack.

And here, in this flashback-summary, we’re told explicitly that this attack was sparked by Israel’s refusal to allow other nations to benefit from Rosenzweig’s formula — not for any price.

So, then, on the one hand we have Ethiopia, a nation chronically ravaged by famine. And on the other hand we have Rosenzweig’s Israel, a nation blessed with miraculous agricultural fertility that it refuses to share or even to sell to people dying of starvation. But we’re supposed to regard Ethiopia as the unambiguous villain in that scenario.

Buck’s current flashback recalls more details of his earlier flashback to the explicit divine intervention that spared Israel from any harm despite the exhaustion of Russia’s entire nuclear arsenal in its attack.

The miraculous delivery of that country from any damage, injury, or death — despite the incredible aerial assault — made Buck a believer in God, though not yet in Christ. There was no other explanation for bombs, missiles, and warships crashing and burning all over the nation, yet every citizen and building escaped unscathed.

It’s not obvious to me why the authors say there, “though not yet in Christ.” Buck’s newfound faith is the result of experiencing an epic, undeniable supernatural act by the God of Israel in defense of Israel. That shouldn’t have set him on a path toward Christianity, it should have made him a resolute convert to Judaism.

 

  • aunursa

    “Left Behind” Trivia Time: Chad Michael Murray plays journalist Cameron ‘Buck’ Williams. Why is he nicknamed ‘Buck’?

    Anne Marie **** Because he “bucks” the system with his hard hitting journalism.
    March 28 at 7:58am

    Corey ****** He bucks the traditions of regular journalists.
    March 28 at 8:06am

    Kimberly * **********
    His “bucking the system” personality and drive take him all the way to challenging the system of the anti-christ!
    March 28 at 8:11am

    [30 additional, essentially identical responses: Because he "bucks" the system]

    The Official – Left Behind Movie Well done everyone! Buck makes a name for himself with his willingness to rush into danger for a good story, and he acquires his nickname from his willingness to “buck” journalistic traditions.
    March 30 at 6:32am

    Sadhana ****** Hey, so I got the answer right!
    March 30 at 9:49pm

    Nina ***** What happened to Kirk Cameron? I love him in these movies.
    March 30 at 10:24am

  • Justin

    I understand Mr. Berkowitz got into the LA Country Club wearing a moose head.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Yes Fred, there are a lot of contradictory ideas here. But one of the defining traits of an authoritarian follower is a kind of mental partitioning that lets mutually exclusive ideas into their head, and holds them apart so they do not annihilate each other in an explosion of cognitive dissonance. They take each new detail as it comes in, accept it uncritically and potentially believe it genuinely, then file it away in its own slot away from all the others. No attempt is made to connect these ideas together into a unified conceptual model.

    I was aware of how people like that could be exploited politically, but it only just occurred to me that this would give them a great deal of tolerance for poorly thought-out fiction. No wonder they love this series so much, they do not see the conflict.

  • aunursa

    This is where, if this were a 1980s TV series, the screen would go all wavy and we’d hear Buck in voice-over saying, dreamily, “I remember it like it was yesterday …”

    Cam-Cam: It’s been a week since the greatest disaster the world has ever seen. A week since all around the world simply vanished off the face of the earth. People everywhere are still struggling to come to terms with the reality of what has happened…

  • Victor Savard

    (((NRA: God Bless You, Dr. Rosenzweig)))

    Are YA being sarcastic here Fred?

    I hear YA! MOI?

    http://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=18142394&postID=8516266288383586158

    Sorry Fred!

    Go Figure NOW! :)

    Peace

  • aunursa

    The prosperity brought about by the miracle formula changed the course of history for Israel. Flush with cash and resources, Israel made peace with her neighbors.

    Boy, a formula that made the desert bloom would sure be a lifesaver for the Israeli economy. Instead, the Israel of today is … flush with cash and resources, bursting with high-tech start-ups, with the third most companies listed on the NASDAQ stock exchange behind the United States and China.

  • flat

    Well as Fred noted in his earlier essays: why didn’t they just steal the formule.
    I mean the whole dessert is now a vegetable garden, it would be incredible easy to get the miracle formule.

    And by using deduction they would find out how to reproduce it.
    But then again I am using logic, sorry people I forgot this is left behind.

  • http://heathencritique.wordpress.com/ Ruby_Tea

    Well, Nina, Kirk Cameron has gone on to play second fiddle to not-a-bibliophile Ray Comfort, which job involves holding up pictures of “crocoducks” and pretending he understands 4th-grade biology.

  • http://heathencritique.wordpress.com/ Ruby_Tea

    Verna Zee Sensible Shoes Confrontation Countdown: 207 pages

  • aunursa

    That shouldn’t have set him on a path toward Christianity, it should have made him a resolute convert to Judaism.

    But Christianity is simply Judaism + Jesus. Didn’t y’all know that?

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    One thing that bothers me about Rosenzweig’s formula is that, once a thing has been proven to be possible, it is not long before others repeat the process of that discovery. Think about artificial nuclear fission. The earliest forms were developed in secret in the Manhattan Project, the specifics of their function was kept a closely guarded secret for obvious reasons. Yet, it did not take the Soviet Union very long to begin their own nuclear program. Many thought that this must have meant that someone gave the Soviets the secret of the bomb (leading to the Red Scare) but in reality it was just the Soviets quickly playing catch-up once the concept had been proven to be workable.

    Even if other countries wanted Rosenzweig’s formula, if they cannot get it from him, then they need to resort to developing their own versions. It should not be that hard to make their own versions, especially if they manage to get a few soil samples from Israel (when the entire country is now farm land getting a few handfuls of dirt should be pretty easy.) Once Rosenzweig proved it could be done, others can do it too, having some soil to chemically analyze would just expedite that process.

  • http://heathencritique.wordpress.com/ Ruby_Tea

    …when an American writer describes an Israeli character as speaking in a “charming Hebrew-accented dialect.”

    It gets even better–in Desecration–

    …but his was still the plaintive, weak voice with the thick Hebrew accent that reminded Buck of Jewish comedians or storytellers or timid scholars—the latter of which Dr. Rosenzweig certainly was.

  • Vermic

    How is it that using the formula to grow on concrete “had never been proven”? Doesn’t sound like it would be a very expensive test.

    (Incidentally, if Chaim’s formula is that potent, it would make one hell of a bioweapon.)

  • Magic_Cracker

    I’m sure I’m not the first commenter to think this, but Rosenzweig’s magical elixir sounds a lot like water to me. I mean, isn’t that usually what’s needed to make the desert bloom?

  • aunursa

    The whole dessert is now a vegetable garden? What’s on the menu: carrot cake? Sweet potato pie? Zuchini cupcakes? ;-)

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    They seem to be operating under the assumption that Israel is some kind of war-ravaged backwater that can never get a leg up and has little in the way of resources or intellectual capital. I might grant some of that may be a little more believable if, say, this were taking place in the early 1950s when the nation was still very young and getting established, but then again L&J seem to be suck in the 1950s themselves.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    How he wanted this man to become a believer! Buck had come to love Chaim.

    This kind of gushy language really is kind of uncomfortable. It makes me wonder if LaHaye is part of a Christian sect that purposely uses this kind of language to condition the listener or reader into feeling well-disposed towards “unbelievers” while maintaining a feeling of self-superiority.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Wheat and cucumbers, if the previous book is anything to go by…

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    …but his was still the plaintive, weak voice with the thick Hebrew
    accent that reminded Buck of Jewish comedians or storytellers or timid
    scholars—the latter of which Dr. Rosenzweig certainly was.

    Why does this suddenly remind me of 1984′s description of Emmanuel Goldstein?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    This emphasis on Israeli agriculture and “desert blooming” reminds me of that great fictional vignette I saw somewhere in Fred’s LB posts, where we see a young Israeli woman disgustedly surveying the field she’s been sent to work on and wishing she was doing anything but this backbreaking labor day in and day out.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    It’s not obvious to me why the authors say there, “though not yet in Christ.”

    Because without hasty assurance to the contrary, then the readers might be inclined to think that belief in God—perhaps even in any manifestation of God—would be sufficient faith to be saved from TurboJesus and the Eternity of Hellfire (coming 1999 2000 2002 2008 2012 2013)!

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Messianic Jews are totally still Jews. Just ask a Christian. :p

  • http://heathencritique.wordpress.com/ Ruby_Tea

    It reminds me of your discussion of love-bombing in Edge of Apocalypse–they do the same thing to Hattie when trying to talk her out of an abortion–”We love you Hattie, we really, REALLY love you!

    Yeah, it’s pretty cringe-inducing. And pretty guilt-tripping. And pretty much strips the word “love” of all meaning, much like the Christian radio hosts who breathlessly claim to love “everyone.”

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    @Vermic:disqus Kind of the opposite of Agent Orange, eh?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Speaking of. And yeah, it struck me as being like that creepy love-bombing stuff too. :O

  • aunursa

    And what do they have to look forward to? Everyone say it with me: Piles of steaming vegetables drenched in butter.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Even if other countries wanted Rosenzweig’s formula, if they cannot get
    it from him, then they need to resort to developing their own versions.
    It should not be that hard to make their own versions, especially if
    they manage to get a few soil samples from Israel (when the entire
    country is now farm land getting a few handfuls of dirt should be pretty
    easy.) Once Rosenzweig proved it could be done, others can do it too,
    having some soil to chemically analyze would just expedite that process.

    Indeed. And with the Green Revolution of the 1960s, we already know that selective breeding of plants and the proper use of fertilizer can produce amazing results.

    You know, come to think of it, doesn’t this Rosenzweig formula depend on that old “The rain follows the plow” idea? The plants growing under the influence of his formula need water, surely. If they suck water out of the desert and transpire it, there’s going to be no more left pretty fast!

    So it either has to rain a LOT more there, or Israel has to foot the bill for a gigantic desalinization and irrigation network over – what, thousands of square kilometers?

    Imagine if a pipe broke, or a computer failed, or…. invent your own crisis here. :O

  • c2t2

    Was it a professionally published piece or a Right Behind storylet?

    *ahem* http://exharpazo.blogspot.com/2010/03/lipre.html

    (I really need to finish parts 2 and 3)

  • kadh2000

    I thought it was because he had, as a youth, applied to replace the Cadbury Bunny.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Heck, I would think that Israel engineered its own crisis with the agricultural overproduction born of Rosenzweig’s formula, an economic one. Imagine that many crops flooding the market at once, the price of produce would drop really quickly. Israel would find itself overproducing and underselling, probably driving itself into an economic slump when the prices level out across the market.

    Now, it might have gained considerable profit from Rosenzweig’s formula if it had actually done what the other countries were asking for, which is to sell it, or more precisely, to license it. That kind of thing works for Monsanto’s profits, it could work for Israel’s profits. Sure, all these other countries are growing their own bumper crops with Rosenzweig Brand Soil™, but from each sale those individual crops make, Israel gets a little money back. Collectively, that is a lot of money back.

    The economic model just makes more sense that way.

  • aunursa

    Wouldn’t it be something if Israel really did invent something that made the desert bloom?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    That was the very one! Reminds me of Wheelworld, by the way. Same premise: indentured farmers grow oodles and oodles of food and make some people obscenely rich due to nearly nil production costs.

  • Lori

    Other nations had been jealous to get hold of the formula.

    This sentence is just bad. Can’t Jenkins do anything right?

  • TheBrett

    If anything, the formula would be brutal for a lot of farmers. You’d get a flood of produce, a massive drop in agricultural prices, and a lot of farmers out of business because they can’t make ends meet at the new prices. Good for everyone else (super-cheap food!), but not really a source of wealth.

    I doubt the formula would stay secret for long, either. It would probably take some visiting chemists grabbing some formula-enriched soil and moving it across the border to be taken to research laboratories to get the ball rolling on independently figuring it out.

    I feel a little sorry for Buck here, congratulating himself on his “historic” designation as a senior writer. What this designation actually meant was that Stanton Bailey realized he could save some overtime expense by switching Buck from an hourly employee to an exempt, salaried staff-member. Bailey guessed, correctly, that this little ladder-climber would be so intoxicated by the new title that he wouldn’t even realize it meant longer hours for less pay. “Good news, Williams! We’re making you a senior writer — the youngest senior writer the magazine has ever had.” The kid bought it hook, line and sinker.

    It’s good to know that the Mega-Car was not the first time that Buck got suckered.

    I’m trying to think of what Buck could possibly bring to the table as a reporter for Global Weekly – and I mean the real Buck, not his ridiculous self-conception. Maybe he’s really good at writing catchy ass-kissing pieces about whoever happens to be famous at the moment, like a younger, less intelligent Thomas Friedman.

  • Justin

    “Rosenzweig’s concoction, some said without much exaggeration, allowed flora to grow anywhere — even on concrete.

    The latter had never been proven…”

    Uhh, why not? Maybe you wanna…I dunno…test it, or something?

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    That sentence is bad, and Jenkins should feel bad.

  • Cradicus

    Wait, I thought the attack was a complete surprise? In fact one could say that it was as surprising as the Great Wall of China is long! (I wouldn’t say that, but Senior Writer Buck Williams did!)

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    If anything, the formula would be brutal for a lot of farmers. You’d get
    a flood of produce, a massive drop in agricultural prices, and a lot of
    farmers out of business because they can’t make ends meet at the new
    prices. Good for everyone else (super-cheap food!), but not really a
    source of wealth.

    You know, this implication makes the scenario in c2t2′s post even more plausible: the only way to get back to making huge profits out of a MIracle-Gro formula is by forcing people to work for next to nothing, and because they can’t get citizenship anywhere else, they’re stuck working the land so some agribiz outfit that has deep connections with the government can get all the money.

  • TheBrett

    Sort of. The Soviets did have people who leaked information to them about making a bomb (Klaus Fuchs), although they likely would have figured it out on their own eventually.

    I agree with your broader point. There’s no way Israel would be able to prevent people form taking soil samples across one of its many borders to end up in a chemical laboratory, where they could independently duplicate the formula after some time.

  • Anonymous

    Regarding “condescend”:

    I think Jenkins is attempting to use the word in an old-fashioned sense, wherein it refers to someone who is in fact of a superior status doing a favor for an inferior. For example, Barack Obama might condescend to invite me to his birthday party.

    Presumably, the miracle formula makes Chaim Rosenzweig a superior status to the diplomats and political leaders who court him, so that he’d be condescending to give them the formula. But I think this is doing violence to even an archaic understanding of “condescend.”

  • Lori

    My first thought was that Jenkins had been reading Jane Austin.

  • Mark Z.

    Damn, you’re right. Mix it with some kudzu seeds or something, spray over enemy cities.

  • markedward

    Actually, prophecy experts (I use that phrase loosely) claimed was Moscow was ‘Meshech’, from the same passage where Magog is mentioned by Ezekiel. They also chose to transliterate the word ‘Rosh’ (instead of translating it as ‘leader’ or ‘chief’), so they could connect it to ‘Russia’.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Neat technique, but not quite as revolutionary as it needs to be to serve the needs of this series unfortunately sketchy plot.

    You know, a much more plausible scenario than in the books would be if Rosenzweig was actually some kind of engineer who invented some kind of miracle desalinization device which was capable of reliably making several tons of freshwater from saltwater every hour. Now that would lead to a farming revolution, desert blooming in an unprecedented manner, etc.

  • c2t2

    It took me a few minutes to reply because I was bouncing around my room squealing with glee that anyone read/liked the piece, even though I’m simultaneously doing the authorial cringe at my old prose. You may have just inspired me to finish the damn thing! (I have Ideas about the rapture that I never got around to posting. Evil, evil Ideas.)

  • BC

    We could use Miracle Gro to get a desert to bloom. It’s not chemicals that keep deserts from blooming, it’s lack of water! Oh, and once you start irrigating, the hard part is to keep the soils leached of salts – there are salts in soil and salts in water that need to be washed out of the root zone or the soils will either freeze up (harden) so that plants can’t put down roots or will get so salty that nothing will grow, regardless of the amount of chemicals placed in the ground. It is thought that Mesopotamia was the first civilization to experience this – there’s a reason that Iraq has desert and non-fruitiful land around the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. Wonder what the fundie farmers think of Chaim Rosenzwieg’s miracle formula?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Actually, prophecy experts (I use that phrase loosely) claimed was
    Moscow was ‘Meshech’, from the same passage where Magog is mentioned by
    Ezekiel. They also chose to transliterate the word ‘Rosh’ (instead of
    translating it as ‘leader’ or ‘chief’), so they could connect it to
    ‘Russia’.

    It’s honestly pretty thin.

    I mean, there’s considerable ground for interpretation, and in fact if you go back to the 18th century, you’ve got people who attribute the End Times to schisms within the Roman Catholic church.

  • Dogfacedboy

    The Official – Left Behind Movie Well done everyone! Buck makes a name for himself with his willingness to rush into danger for a good story, and he acquires his nickname from his willingness to “buck” journalistic traditions.

    Oh, my guess was wrong then. I assumed it was an acronym for Baboonish Useless Clueless Knucklehead.

  • hidden_urchin

    They just let it go.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

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