7 things @ 11 o’clock (7.19)

1. You can get killed just for living in your American skin.

2. Republican House members Pete King, Michael Grimm, Christopher Gibson, Richard Hanna, Tom Reed II, and Chris Collins are going to have a hard time explaining to their constituents in New York state why they all voted 37 times to repeal a law that will mean considerable savings in health insurance costs for those same constituents. “Health Plan Cost for New Yorkers Set to Fall 50%The New York Times reports:

State insurance regulators say they have approved rates for 2014 that are at least 50 percent lower on average than those currently available in New York. Beginning in October, individuals in New York City who now pay $1,000 a month or more for coverage will be able to shop for health insurance for as little as $308 monthly. With federal subsidies, the cost will be even lower.

3. The final, official confirmation of the legalization of marriage equality in England and Wales is a big freaking deal. The queen’s “Royal Assent” is bound to have a ripple effect throughout the Commonwealth and even to stir things up a bit in the Anglican communion. It wasn’t major screaming-headline news, though, in part because all the major hurdles had already been cleared and we knew this was coming, but also because we’re all getting more used to this. It’s no longer earth-shaking, paradigm-shifting news, but more like one more in a growing list of milestones on a long, still-incomplete journey on which we seem to be gaining momentum.

So once again it’s kind of Big News that this story isn’t bigger news. Opponents of marriage equality barely had the energy to rend their garments and proclaim that the sky will fall. We heard a few perfunctory lamentations from the usual suspects, but that was it.

The Texas Freedom Network has another dog-that-didn’t-bark story on San Antonio’s efforts to “pass a non-discrimination ordinance that, among other things, says businesses can’t tell prospective patrons to take their business elsewhere simply because they’re gay or lesbian.” The city’s most vocal and visible Catholic and evangelical leaders, TFN notes, “have been somewhat mum on the matter.”

It’s not that San Antonio mega-church pastor and “Bible prophecy scholar” John Hagee has renounced his virulently anti-gay preaching, but as TFN writes, “In a few short years he went from the intolerant rhetoric of blaming Adam and Steve for the worst natural disaster to strike this country to ‘no comment’ when approached by a reporter. And that is, um … progress?” Yes, it is.

4. Here’s another, more tangible bit of progress, and excellent news for 99 percent of Americans: “Senate Confirms Richard Cordray as Consumer Watchdog.” They’ve got all the money, but we’ve still got a few laws and rights to defend ourselves. And now we’ve got the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in place to ensure those laws and rights actually mean something.

Related, from Consumerist: “5 Sample Letters That Get Debt Collectors Out of Your Face.” And from the CFPB: “New ways to combat harmful debt collection practices.” I hope you never need that information, but there it is just in case. It’s useful stuff in a country where money is power and where nearly all of the church continues to ignore the first thing Jesus ever preached: Jubilee is everything.

5. Seriously, here is everything you need to know about American Christianity: Leviticus 20:13 is widely known and discussed as a clobber text and the litmus test for any Christians’ fidelity to the Bible. Deuteronomy 15:1 is not.

Sometimes I think we almost need a Westboro-style protest group with signs that say “God hates banks.” But instead we got Dave Ramsey and the perverse notion that debt is immoral only for the debtors.

6. Eric Bradenson courageously challenges his fellow Republicans to stop “denying the science” of climate change and to “admit that 97 percent of scientists just might be right.” Bradenson thinks small-government conservatives “have better answers than the other side” when it comes to the challenge of climate change and he boldly urges the GOP to change course — to lead rather than to obstruct in meeting that challenge.

Bradenson’s words are brave, but, as Steve Benen reports, the writer himself is a bit more prudently cautious. “Eric Bradenson” is actually a pseudonym, used “for job security reasons” to protect “his boss and himself.”

“In other words,” Benen says, “to write a piece making the case that Republicans can ‘win the climate debate’ by pushing conservative solutions to a real problem, is to put one’s job in Republican politics in jeopardy. This really isn’t healthy.”

7. The kids are all right. (And they’re also kind of adorable.)

YouTube Preview Image
Stay in touch with the Slacktivist on Facebook:

OotGOism: 'Whoever tries to keep their life will lose it ...'
Things I Have Learned Due to My Google News Alert for the Word 'Satanic'
Seems like a thousand years to go
Relitigating the Golden Rule
  • aunursa

    I love those kids! The future is promising.

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    It did sort of bum me out about the past, though; like when that little girl is all “didn’t George Washington fight for freedom?” No, sorry; he explicitly excluded women, non-white people & non-rich people from that. Don’t believe the hype.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    Makes you wonder, in a couple of hundred years, what our descendants will condemn us for being lukewarm about. What will be thing that’s never even occurred to you that will someday be the second half of the sentence “Sure, he cared about marriage equality for same-sex couples, but he explicitly excluded —“

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    Polygamy? Or, if you want to go really hardcore, eating meat?

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    I know lots of vegans who are absolutely certain that in a few hundred years, yes, it;ll be all “I don’t understand why they built statues of Martin Luther King Jr; surely he didn’t really care at all about equality since he also ate meat. He really just another being all wrapped up in homo sapiens-privilege who only cared about getting more privilige for him and his.”

    But for my money, it’ll be something that would literally never even occur to us.

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    I don’t buy that; it is too easy & besides, it isn’t like the Founding Fathers didn’t have slavery abolitionists among them. The idea that keeping people as slaves was a clearly appalling thing was not a secret 250 years ago.

  • Eric Boersma

    The Cheerios response to the outrage about the initial commercial is both encouraging and made me laugh and smile. I like Cheerios a bit more today than I did yesterday.

  • The_L1985

    “Why are they upset? Was this commercial made in the 1950’s or something?”

    Out of the mouths of babes…

  • Baby_Raptor

    Plain Cheerios are the best cereal.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Sometimes I feel like I’m the only person who tastes them the way I do — as extremely salty.

  • Baby_Raptor

    Can’t say I’ve ever tasted salt in them, but I am only one person.

  • dpolicar

    I began tasting them that way after my stroke, when I was being absurdly hypervigilant around sodium intake. They do in fact have a high amount of sodium. I have no idea whether I was actually tasting them that way bottom-up, or whether I was top-down projecting the expectation of saltiness. Either way, it went away after a year or so, along with several other post-traumatic things; they taste pretty neutral to me now.

  • Asha

    I enjoy them, but it is largely because they aren’t cloyingly sweet. *shrugs* I do notice a bit of a salty taste but its never overwhelming for me

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Plain Cheerios do not taste salty (at least, to this person).

  • Veleda_k

    Re number 1: Was Mr. Morgan wearing a hoodie?

    Also, I long for an emergence of radical Christians. Not the Quiverfulls or the Dominists, but a group who really believe in Jubilee and seek to implement it. People who walk the walk when it comes to feeding the hungry and clothing the naked.

  • LL

    It’s the 21st century. It’s kinda depressing that things like “interracial” couples and equal rights for homosexual people are still considered “controversial.”

    But it is nice that we are making some progress, however slow it may be. I am going to try really hard not to become the kind of bitter, hateful, close-minded old person that a lot of Americans seem to be right now (and I think it is largely an old person thing, not that there aren’t plenty of younger idiots, too).

    I’m 47. I’d like to think that as I age, I will get smarter (socially, at least), rather than stupider. Why the hell do people turn into assholes when they get old? Or have they always been assholes and they’re kind of the people in charge now, so we hear from them more often?

    Gay people, black people – them living their lives takes nothing from me. How small do you have to be to see other people’s happiness and freedom as a threat to your own? Seriously. I’m not by any means naive, but it’s just appalling to me that tens of thousands of years of human history hasn’t demonstrated to people of normal intelligence that making large groups of people “less than” others doesn’t make sense. From any standpoint. Social harmony, economic stability, political stability, the wellbeing of the species in general. Hating people and keeping them down doesn’t benefit anybody, in the long-term.

  • AnonaMiss

    It’s the 21st century. It’s kinda depressing that things like “interracial” couples and equal rights for homosexual people are still considered “controversial.”

    It’s only been 50 years on the interracial front. 10 years since Lawrence, which wasn’t nearly as landmark as Loving.

    Honestly, in the grand scheme of how long it usually takes this kind of shit to go away, I think we’re doing as well as could be expected.

    Not that we shouldn’t keep working, just, the US on race has moved farther in 2 or so generations than a lot of places move in 20.

  • dpolicar

    Yeah, this. Somewhere in my 30s I switched from thinking about social progress in terms of years to thinking about it in terms of generations. It’s a lot less disheartening when I view it that way.

    It also seems reasonable, if I assume that mostly the way cultural change works is that the current culture-holders die and their children are raised in a different culture.

  • LL
  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    They did the exact same thing to 10 year old Sebastien De La Cruz and publicshaming caught them there too. http://publicshaming.tumblr.com/post/52763976629/racist-basketball-fans-pissed-a-mexican-american-boy

  • Lori

    They did the whole “Liberals are the real racists” dance of stupidity with the Trayvon Martin verdict and the President’s comments about it today and Public Shaming did its thing then too:

    http://publicshaming.tumblr.com/post/55434775157/tumblr-idiots-have-dumb-opinions-on-george-zimmerman

    http://publicshaming.tumblr.com/post/55892945838/president-obama-makes-thoughtful-statement-on-trayvon

    Basically, as long as the kind of people who post at Red State also have access to Twitter, Public Shaming will never run out of things to post.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    In a way, I’m glad for Public Shaming. This sort of thing shouldn’t exist in a bubble — that’s half the problem. They get an echo chamber where they can say whatever they want and the only people who hear it are people who agree with them, reinforcing the message. It’s good that someone calls attention to it in an effort to pierce the bubble. On the other hand, it might just be socially isolating them, so that the bubble becomes the only place where they can be themselves and now they know that everyone else is one of Them…

  • reynard61

    “Tribal Identification” in action…

  • de_la_Nae

    The less charitable part of my mind says “Good, let them go scrabble in the dust, starve, and die. They are only holding us back and wasting our time and lives.”

    Then I sigh, say a little prayer, smooth that hurt back down a bit, and get back to work trying to make things better a more right way, instead of a more easy way.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I just cannot get my head around the way this sheer granite WALL of hatred goes flying up among Americans who hold such nativist and exclusivist views of who is entitled to be an American.

  • JustoneK

    I kinda can. But it makes me very very sad and dwelling on it eventually convinces me I don’t exist.

  • Lori

    I think those appalling tweets give a pretty clear picture of how it happens—they just repeat each other. One fuckwit says that Marc Anthony is Mexican and all the rest of the fuckwits jump on the whine train for a little tour through the Racist Valley where American = white and everyone who is any shade of brown is either Mexican or Arab.

    All those morons obviously have internet access and it’s not like Marc Anthony is obscure and non-Google-able. The man was married to J Lo for Pete’s sake. If you actually do Google him the fact that he was born in NYC comes up on the first screen. Doesn’t matter. They don’t bother. One racist pops off and that’s the signal for the rest of them to let their uneducated id out to play.

  • Hexep

    Ehh, I think this sort of thing happens everywhere. If there are any countries in the world where minorities are smoothly integrated and welcomed by the majority, I’ve never heard of them.

  • mattmcirvin

    Attitudes about race, feminism, homosexuality, etc., generally don’t regress; if anything, most people get more tolerant about these things, or stay the same. But when attitudes they thought of as tacit and universal become threatened with obsolescence, they can react in vocally assholish ways. As far as they’re concerned, the world is turning upside down. What was a progressive or moderate attitude has suddenly become a reactionary one, and people don’t necessarily take that well.

    Then, on top of that, old people tend to be understandably more risk-averse as their health becomes less robust and their incomes fixed. That can manifest as an opposition to change.

  • AnonaMiss

    Iran would like a word with you.

  • mattmcirvin

    That’s a different situation. In Iran in the late Seventies, the secular, ostensibly less-reactionary authorities were themselves outrageously oppressive and corrupt, and the radical Islamists could paint themselves as the populist opposition, and drive cultural attitudes after they took over. (Morsi was probably trying to follow a gentler version of that script in Egypt, but it didn’t work out so well for him.)

    Something like that is certainly a potential danger in the US, but it’s not the process of individual evolution that I’m talking about.

  • J_Enigma32

    Not only that, but the United States doesn’t have the United States and Great Britain to meddle in its affairs and force an unpopular Shah on the throne after ousting your democratically elected prime minister for fear of him nationalizing the oil companies.

    If anything, what’s happening to us has more in common with what happened to Afghanistan.

  • reynard61

    “Why the hell do people turn into assholes when they get old?”

    It seems to me that it’s primarily a certain *segment* of older people who become that specific type of asshole. They seem to have grown comfortable with a certain status quo (i.e. “Blacks are okay just as long as I don’t have to see or hear them and they don’t try to assert that they are Human in any way”), and anything that (in their view at least) disturbs that comfort is something that *threatens them personally*.

    “Or have they always been assholes and they’re kind of the people in charge now, so we hear from them more often?”

    Yeah, this too…

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    I seem to recall reading an article which said that the reason some older people start seeming more and more up front about racism is because as we age, parts of our brain start to activate less readily, including the part of the brain which normally acts like a conscience filter for speech. What you’re getting is id to mouth communication with nothing in between.

  • reynard61

    I suppose that that makes sense too. When the pool filter gets full or becomes too much trouble to maintain, some people will just decide to remove it and settle for swimming in slightly-dirty water. That’s probably not a perfect analogy, but it’s the best one that I can come up with at the moment.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Bad analogies are some of the best analogies.

    So play your favorite cover song / Especially if the words are wrong

  • mattmcirvin

    Old people typically give less and less of a damn about whether they’re causing offense when they say stuff, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. It depends on what the internal attitudes are that are coming out. If they’re ugly, the resulting remarks will be super-ugly.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam
  • Ima Pseudonym

    I think they have more control over it than many of them would prefer you to believe. I’ve heard more than one assholic oldster say some variation of “I’ve simply developed a chronic case of ‘I-No-Longer-Give-a-Shit-itis,'” so while declining neurological filtering might be a contributing factor, I don’t really believe it’s the whole story. I think that a great many of them–the worst of them, I mean, the ones who got ugly and bitter as the decades wore on–have simply seen the world they live in run off and leave them far behind, and they’ve simply stopped caring much about it or the people living in it. And they believe that their advancing age gives them a free pass to say whatever they feel like. I’m pretty sure that that’s one of the factors behind Tim LaHaye’s warped theology–the world he lived in for so many decades is gone forever, he absolutely loathes what’s taken its place, and the Left Behind novels represent LaHaye’s God destroying the modern world and taking everything back to the simpler time that only ever really existed in the distorted memories of his youth and KEEPING it there, by sheer force.

  • kisekileia

    Interesting how we use brain development issues as an excuse to deny young people a voice in politics and control over their lives, but nobody even considers, say, denying the vote to people over 80. Not that I think the latter should be done, but I see way too much sentiment that young adults are really just kids and very little equivalent sentiment regarding old people.

  • LL
  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    The queen’s “Royal Assent” is bound to have a ripple effect throughout the Commonwealth

    People here should be aware that by and large, in Westminster-parliament systems (UK, Canada, Australia, NZ etc), “royal assent” is by now largely a formality and never refused by the Queen or the Governor-General.

    For the Queen to have refused Royal Assent would have not only meant a body blow to marriage equality, it would have caused a major constitutional crisis in the UK and possibly the other members of the Commonwealth that acknowledge the UK sovereign.

    So it’s good that the Queen saw it as more important to continue the role of the monarch as the ultimate signatory of laws passed by the people than to indulge any personal prejudices she may have had.

  • histrogeek

    I don’t think the royal assent was ever in doubt, except maybe by shit stirrers gunning for republicanism or peddling homophobia (the Murdoch press could do both). The main thing is that it marks the formal legal recognition of same-sex marriage.

  • Ross Thompson

    The queen is, in fact, forbidden from withholding royal assent, just as she’s forbidden from refusing to appoint the elected Prime Minister after a general election.

    These things are forbidden because previous monarchs did refuse to do them, and the House of Commons decided that democracy really didn’t work that way, and kept the rituals without them actually meaning anything.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    In Canada, the Governor-General is not Constitutionally prohibited from giving Royal Assent, but were he or she to do so it would cause some pretty huge problems. The Queen would likely have to sign in the G-G’s stead and then appoint a new G-G.

    (Fun fact: Here she is the Queen of Canada :P )

  • histrogeek

    Unrelated fun fact: The G-G of Australia did dismiss an elected prime minister in 1975 in his own authority. He ended up having to resign, though his choice for prime minister was elected. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1975_Australian_constitutional_crisis

  • MarkTemporis

    Pretty much everyone in the know says there isn’t a homophobic bone in the Queen’s body. Nearly all her staff is gay, as are a good number of the ‘professional’ royal-watchers seen on television.

  • Amtep

    Something like that happened in Belgium, when the King refused to sign a law that permitted abortions. The solution: Belgium was a republic for 24 hours…

  • mattmcirvin

    I suspect the Queen in fact had no such personal prejudices on this front, not that it would have mattered.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    “After being left for dead, he survived and was then charged with
    attempted murder of the four white officers who brutalized him,” Occupy
    wrote on their website, adding that Morgan was found not guilty on three counts,
    including discharging his weapon. The same jury that cleared him of
    opening fire on the officers, however, deadlocked on a charge of
    attempted murder — and another jury found him guilty in January.

    Oh I’m sorry I thought the USA was in this world of post-racial harmony where it is totally not true that being black means you get treated diff–

    Oh, wait.

    In all seriousness, the fact that a police officer can be shot at by another police officer, and the cop doing the shooting can be basically granted immunity because he’s white and his victim is black —

    There is something very deeply, fundamentally wrong with the state of race relations in the USA.

  • David M. Chess

    So the response I’ve gotten from some Very Serious Christians when I ask questions of the form “why Lev 20:13 and not (some other OT rule)?” has been “because of Acts 15:29, which says that we can ignore the OT except for a few things including Sexual Immorality, so Lev 20:13 still applies, but not laws about shrimp, or divorce, or debts”. This seems like extremely selective reading to me, of course, but is there a less generic comment on it?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Oh, it totally is selective reading.

    I have lost count of the number of times I’ve seen rationalizations of rejecting the Mosaic dietary laws with *HANDWAVEHANDWAVE* “That was the Old Testament! Ignore it!” and then the same folks with complete unself-conscious awareness of their Mt. Everest levels of hypocrisy, turn around and quote something from Leviticus as TOTES BIBLICAL PROOF that QUILTBAG people should resign themselves to being considered at best second-class citizens and at worst, “abominations” to be killed.

  • AnonaMiss

    A narrow reading of Acts 15:29 which also ignores Paul’s interpretation in the verses which follow would excuse Christians from dietary laws, but nothing else. But if you’re willing to mix fabrics, you’d better accept gay people.

  • Matri

    But if you’re willing to mix fabrics, you’d better accept gay people.

    Silly boy, that’s what retcons are for.

  • Matri

    Sorry! “Miss”!

    Urgh. I am truly sorry for that mix-up. I clicked submit before fully reading the name… :(

  • AnonaMiss

    I don’t mind at all! I picked the handle during a feminism discussion when I was offering a counterpoint, long ago, and didn’t want to be mistaken for mansplaining; not because it bothers me personally to be misgendered.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam
  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam
  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Holy shitballs I just felt a sudden suspicious chill beneath my feet

    Did hell just freeze over????

  • Baby_Raptor

    I had the same reaction when it was announced on Joe.My.God

  • mattmcirvin

    Sometimes, they know when they’ve lost. Sometimes.

  • GDwarf

    I ‘unno about that. Isn’t this the same party that’s voted to repeal Obamacare something like three dozen times now? They know it won’t pass both houses or survive a presidential veto, so clearly they feel that wasting everyone’s time is better than acknowledging defeat.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    The latest email making the rounds from the Democrats basically makes no bones: They are shooting for a Democratic-majority House and Senate to at least get some goddamn legislation passed.

  • John (not McCain)

    But the Justice Department will take over for the House GOP for reasons I do not understand.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    On come on. Jesus, I thought the Obama Administration had already finished trying to jump on the Fail Train Express.

    Didn’t they agree to stop “defending” indefensible laws already?

  • LoneWolf343

    Have a citation for that?

  • http://timothy.green.name/ Timothy (TRiG)

    Nope.

    BLAG: We’re defending this law because we think it’s good, just, and necessary.

    Justice Department: Please throw out this court case; it’s moot, as we’re getting rid of this law anyway.

    So yes, the JD is, technically, on the “defence” side of this court case, but it’s not exactly taking over from the BLAG.

    Or something like that, anyway. (Read the comment thread for further detail.)

    TRiG.

    Also, gah do I hate comment nesting.

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Why are you following my Disqus comments?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Why are you being such a fucking weirdo about upvotes, downvotes and comments?

  • Ross Thompson

    Same-sex marriage in the UK probably won’t have an effect on the Anglican Church any time soon; the Church of England and the Church in Wales are forbidden from performing same-sex weddings; other religions can opt out of performing same-sex marriages (just as they can for any other wedding); and if multiple churches share the same space, they all have to agree that same-sex marriages are OK before any of them can perform same-sex weddings in that space.

    And the CofE is still complaining that this will lead to them being sued for not performing same-sex weddings.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Fox News continues to deny that there is a war on women. It is, however, happy to admit that there is a war on men.

    Proof that there is a war on men?

    They’re no longer allowed to discriminate against women!

  • Baby_Raptor

    Same theory as the war on Christians. Christians are persecuted because they can no longer step on everyone else.

  • Jessica_R

    Apropos for LB Friday. Kirk Cameron is back with another “documentary”. And this one is about…wait for it…the problem of suffering. Yes, that’s right, Kirk Cameron is going to attempt to answer one of humanity’s oldest questions on how if there is a God why to bad things happen to good people. It looks as cringe inducing as that sounds, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A22V5rIvmr4

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    I almost want to watch it, but given who it is, I’m afraid it would just be something Calvinist. “People suffer because otherwise how would we Real True Christians know what goodness is?”

  • Jessica_R

    It looks to be better/worse than that. Like it will almost skate up to edge of a healthy answer, “We just don’t know, all we can do is have faith and look out for one another.” But not be able to stop itself from the culture war “It’s totes Jesus. Just believe in Jesus and highlight your Bible enough and vote Republican and nothing bad will ever happen to you or if something bad does happen to you and you can’t just grin and bear it that means the problem is with you.” I am fascinated by Kirk Cameron’s being a Terrence Malick fanboy apparently. I don’t think Tree of Life had that many shots of people standing pensively in fields.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    So Calvinism with a dash of Christian Science and Prosperity Gospel, nice!

  • Jessica_R

    If they had cut out the last few lines the trailer would almost have been passable. I mean you know the whole doc would provide those pat, shallow answers but at least the trailer would be pretending that the answer is hard, if not impossible, to find. But nope, it’s really a Jesus Commercial, New and Improved! Now Doubt Free! Cleans Soap Scum and Crisis of Faith! Act now! The Good guys always win! Even in the 80s!

  • AnonaMiss

    “This video has been removed as a violation of YouTube’s policy against spam, scams, and commercially deceptive content.”

  • Jessica_R

    Ha! Well they certainly weren’t trumped up charges. Here’s another link for now, this is a slightly different much more arty one, it goes the full Elmer Gantry meets Malick, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3RNjdKueC0

  • Jessica_R
  • VMink

    I look at that still image and all I hear is a voice in my mind saying “OBEY. OBEY. OBEY.”

    Seriously, it makes me think of the videos from the ‘Secret World’ ARG a few months ago.

  • AnonaMiss

    Thank ye kindly!

  • Lori

    Man, that really is cut rate Malick.

    Aside from that, the thing that sticks with me is that I hate that rendition of A Mighty Fortress. The phrasing is off in a way the just bugs me.

  • Baby_Raptor

    It’s sad that a sane Republican has to write under a fake name to keep himself safe.

    It becomes terrifying when you remember that the Republicans are still a Fucking major party and that a good chunk of the country actually votes for them consistently.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    ‘Trayvon Martin could’ve been me 35 years ago’ says Obama

    Cue the right-wing hatefest denial of racism in 1, 2, 3….

  • LoneWolf343

    Denial? They would be saying that it is a pity he wasn’t.

  • LoneWolf343

    Past, present, AND future verb tenses all in the same sentence? It’s more likely than you think.

  • JustoneK

    No, it started hours ago. Arguably millennia ago and it just has never stopped.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Yes, but now a black President has had the ~gall~, the ~temerity~, to actually take that omgdrug-usingcriminal Trayvon Martin’s side in the matter.

    Besides, every time anyone dares suggest that outcomes in the USA (but really, you can throw in Canada and the UK here too) are different based on race, the collective shitfit-a-thon that results almost always centers around a combination of:

    1. They’re all just unworthy criminals, so they deserve it anyway
    2. They’re all lazy, so they deserve it anyway
    3. $SELF_SERVING_FLIMSY_ASS_RATIONALE

    the bottom line, of course, to take the blame off anyone but the obviously non-white person.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino
  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    To be fair, I stole the link posted earlier. :p

  • Lee B.

    No surprise: Fox News joins in.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Oh, cuh-lassy. Especially Sean Hannity. (>_<)B

  • AnonaMiss

    Wow, what a shitty article. The second half was an almost exact repeat of the first, in a slightly different mood.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I’m sorry, is… there a reason you’re apparently straining at gnats over the exact literary composition of an article that, as far as I can tell, went over the AP wire?

  • AnonaMiss

    It annoyed the crap out of me?

    Am I not allowed to be annoyed at blatant word count padding? At practically copy-and-pasting parts of the first half into the second half?

    He spoke of his own experience earlier in life of being followed by department store security agents when shopping and of hearing drivers click door locks as they drove by him on the street.

    they sometimes are closely followed when they shop at department stores, that they can draw nervous stares on elevators and hear car locks clicking when they walk down the street — experiences that he personally felt before becoming a well-known figure.

    Seriously, this is some Jerry Jenkins-level stuff.

  • WingedBeast

    … Check out the comments on that page. The hatefest didn’t wait for the cue.

  • GetRealNow

    SOOOO, the kids saw nothing wrong, so what does the adult do but teach them WHY they should be upset and what they should notice as “different.” Create racial tensions. Teach hate. Makes sense.

  • WingedBeast

    Actually, he didn’t. He simply explained why some people are upset, not telling them that they should be upset. And, they responded by being upset with people being racist.
    Just to be clear, you’re suggesting that teaching kids that racism exists creates hatred and racial tension.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Sounds right. One of the links earlier was a group of twitter posts on how acknowledging that racism exists is the real source of racism.

    The rule of unspeakable identity in action yet again: It’s okay to be X, but not to call someone X.

  • GDwarf

    Sounds right. One of the links earlier was a group of twitter posts on how acknowledging that racism exists is the real source of racism.

    I’ve had some…intense discussions about sexism and racism online, and that gets trotted out all the gorram time. “Excuse me, you’re saying I’m racist? I’m not the one treating blacks/women/whatever like children by giving them special laws! That’s true discrimination! If it wasn’t for people like you there wouldn’t be any problems!” I usually have a pretty thick skin about this sort of stuff, but I really, really, wanted to slap them over the internet for that one.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Saw that one a couple of days ago. They were saying that racial quotas in universities are a sign of discrimination. I can kind of see that reasoning, except that most universities have only ever enrolled as many students as their quotas require — and never more than that, even when the pool of students of said race has almost doubled in the years since quotas were first instituted. This indicates that they’re enrolling a bare minimum of students, and if the quotas weren’t there, they wouldn’t enroll as many — if any.

    So yes, they are a sign of discrimination. Both ways.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    The other thing is that ISTR that when quotas and affirmative action policies were discontinued at some unis, minority enrollment plunged even though the unis were supposed to be all like meritocratic and stuff.

  • Ross Thompson

    Of course, now that women apply to university more than men do, female applicants need better grades than male applicants.

    But that’s not discrimination. It’s only discrimination when it’s easier for people who aren’t straight while men.

  • Monala

    And studies have shown that not talking about racism head on with children doesn’t prevent them from adopting racist attitudes. The opposite, in fact — they will eventually pick up negative attitudes around them unless you explicitly teach them that it’s wrong.

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Didn’t I say something like that on a thread here a while ago?
    I never got that many upvotes for doing so and even got some downvotes for it.

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/04/09/good-news-for-people-who-like-good-news-2/#comment-858015579

  • J_Enigma32

    Ah yes, the appeal to the colorblind world.

    Listen, jackass. A monochromatic world is still black and white.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    So ideally, the adults should have just let the kids assume that being upset at a multiracial couple was the proper reaction, and that wouldn’t create racial tensions or teach hate?

    If racial equality and a post-racist world is accomplished by pretending that racial hatred doesn’t still exist or motivates hate crimes, then it seems to me that color-blindness isn’t a good thing.

  • Guest

    I;m kind of glad people don’t pay much attention to Deuteronomy. Check out Deuteronomy 17. That’s the problem with the Bible; some nice ideas and then some appalingly violent tribal ones.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Deuteronomy 13 is even worse, and Deuteronomy 20 advocates slavery, murder and rape. So yeah, Deuteronomy sucks. :p

  • banancat

    Quite frankly, there are more appalling ideas than nice ones, at least in the Pentateuch.

  • John Alexander Harman

    I really appreciate the kids’ intuitive understanding of meta-ethics — part of their reaction is a recognition that expressing moral outrage at something that isn’t morally wrong is itself morally outrageous.

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    Republican House members Pete King, Michael Grimm, Christopher Gibson, Richard Hanna, Tom Reed II, and Chris Collins are going to have a hard time explaining to their constituents in New York state why they all voted 37 times to repeal a law that will mean considerable savings in health insurance costs for those same constituents.

    Nah. They’ll just speak mistruths, or deny it in the face of facts, or blame it somehow on Islam, just like normal.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X