7 things @ 9 o’clock (9.4)

1. “The International House of Prayer (IHOP), a New Apostolic Reformation ministry in Kansas City, Missouri, now has a ministry devoted to the workplace,” the Republic of Gilead reports. “The Joseph Company encourages believers to ‘make an impact for Jesus’ in the sphere of society in which they work.”

When these folks talk about making “an impact for Jesus,” they tend to mean it the way Constantine did. That name — “Joseph Company” — tells you all you need to know about IHOP. They’re faithful servants of Pharaoh, his loyal right-hand man, working hard to consolidate all power under his imperial throne to fulfill their ideal of “dominion” over all the seven pyramids. (Haven’t these people ever read the story of Joseph? It’s not a how-to manual, it’s the set-up for Exodus.)

2. It’s hard to believe that it’s been 20 years since Al Mohler set back Southern Baptist theological education by 60 years in the Great Purge when he took over as Southern’s seminary president. It was the academic equivalent of one of those Florida Marlins fire sales, except instead of unloading salary, Mohler was unloading credibility. Still, what remains a shameful debacle for Southern Baptists turned out to be a blessing for theology students all over the country, as nearly all of the supposedly apostate professors Mohler purged at Southern have gone on to great success, making impressive contributions elsewhere by doing the sort of work that Mohler would not allow and that he has worked hard to ensure no Southern Baptist is capable of.

3. Art Pope is a jerk. Art Pope is a jackwagon.

Yes, it’s sad to be reduced to name-calling. But, alas, Pope’s money insulates him from all other forms of accountability — political, legal, civil, moral, religious, cultural. And thus the only remaining check against the unchecked power of someone like Art Pope is ridicule and name-calling. There’s no way for the people of North Carolina to stop him from ruling their state like a monarch and from turning their democracy into a Pope-ocracy. All that is left is to try to make him a punchline and an object of universal scorn.

So, then. Ahem. Art Pope is a jerk, a complete kneebiter.

4. Our friend Mark Kessler, the “chief” of the one-man police force of Gilberton, Pa., has now been suspended indefinitely due to those violent, profane, racist YouTube videos he keeps posting in which he threatens to kill “libtards” and overthrow the government. Kessler remains a member of the local school board, however, still helping to shape the education of Gilberton’s children.

5. Here’s a depressing follow-up on an earlier piece of Good News. Remember “Operation Cross Country” — the massive FBI sting that “rescued 105 youth and arrested 150 pimps for prostitution in 76 cities”? Turns out that in many of those cases, being “rescued” involved getting handcuffed and arrested. Liberation: UR doing it wrong.

6. People laughed, assuming it was just a prank, when a monument to one of H.P. Lovecraft’s Old Ones appeared outside of an Oklahoma City restaurant. “In the Year of Our Lord 2012 Creer Pipi claimed this land for Azathoth,” the monument reads. I laughed too — until I learned that unkillable blood worms were infecting Oklahoma’s water supply. “You can take the worms out of the filter system and put them in a straight cup of bleach and leave them in there for about four hours, and they still won’t die.” Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn ...

7. Here’s an update on those blog-list tabs above: The Christian QUILTBlogs list includes 114 blogs. The Mosaic lists 242 blogs by Christians of color. And the Bonfire is spreading out of control. It now lists 2,031 blogs written by Christian women.

 

 

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Sunday favorites
Postcards from the culture wars (8.24)
Left Behind Classic Fridays, No. 96: 'Humbert Steele'
'You're better than this' vs. 'You should be ashamed of yourself'
  • aunursa

    Tonight begins Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. It is rare for Rosh Hashanah to occur this early in the Gregorian Calendar. The last time that Rosh Hashanah began on September 4th was in 1899, and the next time will be in 2089.
    The new year is 5774. To my Jewish friends: L’Shana Tova!

  • Shay Guy

    Umetukah. :)

  • Kubricks_Rube

    I’m looking forward to lighting the menorah on Thanksgiving this year.

  • Lori

    What creates a more epic food coma than Thanksgiving? Thanksnukkah!

  • Wednesday

    My uni has an “adopt-an-international-student” program, where you invite some international students Thanksgiving to your Thanksgiving dinner. I’m trying to decide if participating this year would be to much culture shock for whatever international students would get sent my way.

  • Lori

    I suspect this depends on a few things, including how great the language gap is and how you handle the duel holiday.

    If you’re going to keep the two holidays fairly separate you could invite the student for Thanksgiving dinner with a specific end time before sundown and hold off on the Hanukkah stuff until after s/he leaves.

    Alternatively, if clear communication isn’t a problem you could just say “That’s how we celebrate US Thanksgiving….and now for something completely different, ta da!, Hanukkah.”

  • Wednesday

    L’Shana Tova!

    This reminds me, I need to get some apples and honey to share at work tomorrow…

  • Amaryllis

    Rosh HaShanah never comes at the right time;
    It is always too early or too late.
    Who can remember exactly when
    The wheels of our Jewish year
    Intersect the cycles of secular time
    And interrupt our worldly life?

    Rosh HaShanah never comes at the right time;
    Sneaking in right at the end of summer
    After vacation and as school begins,
    Or hanging around in the background
    Only to arrive just after our autumnal schedule has been set.

    Rosh HaShanah always comes before we are ready
    To put aside our past and lay our burdens down.
    There is always something else to do:
    Another job, another client, laundry to fold, a room to paint.
    Rosh HaShanah always catches us by surprise.
    Showing up with a Shofar blast
    And a chorus of angels proclaiming,
    “Hinei Yom HaDin! ”
    “The New Year is here – Judgment Day has arrived.”
    An unexpected summons,
    Like being called to the principal’s office
    Or an audit from the IRS.

    So we stop, turn and listen
    To the arresting voice within and around us
    And gather together and pray
    For peace and for blessings.

    – Lewis Eron

    L’Shana Tova to all who are celebrating.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Thanks, Fred. Now I’ll never be able to look at water the same way again. D-X

    4. Our friend Mark Kessler, the “chief” of the one-man police force of Gilberton, Pa., has now been suspended indefinitely due to those violent, profane, racist YouTube videos he keeps posting in which he threatens to kill “libtards” and overthrow the government. Kessler remains a member of the local school board, however, still helping to shape the education of Gilberton’s children.

    Well, at least one good thing today! It seems the Joe Arpaio wannabes north of the Mason-Dixon don’t quite get the same hero-worship as Arpaio.

    5. Here’s a depressing follow-up on an earlier piece of
    Good News. Remember “Operation Cross Country” — the massive FBI sting
    that “rescued 105 youth and arrested 150 pimps for prostitution in 76
    cities”? Turns out that in many of those cases, being “rescued” involved
    getting handcuffed and arrested. Liberation: UR doing it wrong.

    This sort of thing is why prostitution ought to be legalized and brought under the aegis of medical supervision.

    This kind of “lock ’em up” attitude to what might be termed ‘moral offences’ (drugs and sex) really doesn’t attack the root problem, and just as drug decriminalization and treating addiction as a medical issue rather than a criminal issue is probably better, so too would treating prostitution as a component of society to be made safe as possible for prostitutes themselves.

  • Shay Guy

    Thanks, Fred. Now I’ll never be able to look at water the same way again. D-X

    “Water is patient, Adelaide. Water just waits. It wears down the clifftops, the mountains, the whole of the world. Water always wins.”

  • Ahab

    Thanks for the Republic of Gilead shout-out!

  • Michael Pullmann

    How has International House of Prayer not been sued for calling themselves IHOP?

  • Ahab

    In the past, International House of Prayer and International House of Pancakes fought over the IHOP acronym.

    http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/09/16/ihop.lawsuit/index.html

  • Jeff Weskamp

    #1: Remember kids, the Bible says that our employers and political leaders must be given blind, unthinking obedience…. unless they happen to be Democrats.

    #3: The Republican definition of “voter fraud” is “black people trying to vote.”

    #6: Am I the only one who thinks this sounds like something from a Welcome to Night Vale podcast?

  • aunursa

    #3: The Republican definition of “voter fraud” is “black people trying to vote.”

    Minority turnout increased dramatically after Georgia voter-ID law

  • connorboone

    And that makes voter identification requirements right because…?

  • Nathaniel

    The aunursa non-sequitur of the day! Because obviously if black people are still voting means Republicans haven’t been trying to turn down minority election turn out.

    Here’s a headline for you to chew on:

    Tea Partier Admits Republicans Don’t Want African Americans To Vote. No Sh*t.

    http://thedailybanter.com/2013/06/tea-partier-admits-republicans-dont-want-african-americans-to-vote-no-sht/

    Tell me how that means Republicans don’t want black people to vote. I won’t hold my breath though. Your outstanding trait is your smug cowardice.

  • aunursa

    Because obviously if black people are still voting means Republicans haven’t been trying to turn down minority election turn out.
    If black people are still voting — with dramatically increased rates (even when Obama is not on the ballot,) it means that voter ID requirements don’t prevent minority voters from voting.
    As for Republicans, I assume that they do want blacks to vote — they want them to vote Republican.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    And as long as there is at least one Horatio Alger story come true, that means that every poor American can become a millionaire as long as they work diligently and keep their head down.

  • aunursa

    A 44% rise in black voting, 67% rise in Hispanic voting. That’s a lot of “Horatio Alger” voters.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    So clearly if you threaten people with disenfranchising and they stand up to oppose you, the threat of disenfranchising doesn’t exist because it didn’t work. Every story in which a villain has threatened someone who then defeated them stands as a monument to the fact that villainy isn’t a credible threat.

    Your intellectual dishonesty is sickening. Shame on you.

  • aunursa

    No one is being threatened with disenfranchisement. No one is trying to prevent eligible voters from voting. The villains you fear are in your own mind.

  • Lori

    No one is trying to prevent eligible voters from voting.

    Again, multiple people in positions of power within the GOP have admitted that this is not the case. They’re not lying about it. Why are you?

  • AnonaMiss

    I’d like to clarify something real quick here.

    Voter ID laws are not inherently disenfranchising. What is disenfranchising about them is that, in every state I know of, you have to pay for your ID card. And so the voter ID law in its majestic equality would require both the flush and the penniless to pay $20 every presidential election cycle (or so, depending on the state) to maintain their right to vote.

  • Andrea

    ID cards are free in Indiana.

    You still have to hope the hours and locations are convenient, but there’s explicitly no fee for an ID card for anyone who is otherwise eligible to vote. http://www.in.gov/bmv/2837.htm

  • AnonaMiss

    Nice! I stand happily corrected (for Indiana).

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    It’s also issued through the Motor Vehicle Bureau. Do they have sensible source ID requirements and acceptable hours of operation?

    If not, then it’s just another right-wing fig leaf.

  • Monala

    Furthermore, some of the voter ID laws being put into place seem to deliberately affect certain voters more than others. For example, states which will accept a gun license in place of a driver’s license, but not a state college issued ID.

  • aunursa

    Every state I know of that requires a photo ID for voting provides a free ID for those voters who cannot afford one. I think that an ID requirement without a free ID option would be declared unconstitutional.

  • AnonaMiss

    1. A disenfranchising voter ID law which is later overturned may still be strategically useful to pass. Overturning a law takes much longer than enacting one, which is why the pre-clearance part of the VRA was so important.

    2. http://www.ncsl.org/legislatures-elections/elections/voter-id.aspx

    Georgia has a free option which is valid for voting only. On Indiana I defer to Andrea.

    http://www.dmv.com/ks/kansas/apply-id-card – Kansas photo ID costs $18 ($14 for seniors & disabled).

    http://www.tn.gov/safety/driverlicense/dllicensefees.shtml Tennessee photo ID costs $9.50

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino
  • Lori

    That’s a lot of pissed off voters. The fact that Republicans miscalculated doesn’t change their intent.

    The GOP—evil and stupid.

  • aunursa

    If that were the case, then the Democrats would surreptitiously support voter ID laws everywhere.
    Brer Democrat: Oh no, whatever you do, Brer Republican, don’t you dare enact that racist voter ID laws.
    Think of all those pissed off voters.

  • Lori

    No, Democrats would not support voter ID laws, surreptitiously or otherwise. Because they’re wrong.

    I realize that when it comes to elections the GOP doesn’t ask “Is this right or wrong?” much any more, preferring instead to focus on “Do we think this will make it easier for us to get and maintain power?”, but not everyone is like that.

  • aunursa

    HotAir, which cited the article I linked above, is a conservative website founded by Michelle Malkin and linked to Townhall.com. Its Editor-at-large is a frequent conservative guest on Fox News.

    Hot Air and other conservative sites don’t seem concerned that the increase in minority voting might result in more votes going to Democrats. Their only concerns are that eligible voters are allowed to vote and ineligible voters are not allowed to vote.

    What this showed was that legitimate voters who want to participate found voter-ID to be no barrier, even those who don’t usually show up to the polls with or without voter-ID requirements. That data utterly validates what advocates of voter-ID have always assumed — that legitimate voters of all ethnicities either already have state-issued photo IDs or would have no trouble figuring out how to acquire it, especially since states offer free ID to low-income citizens.

    .
    Following your assertion about the motives of conservatives, rather than touting the increase in minority voting, HotAir and other conservative blogs should be disappointed in the increase and should be reconsidering their support for voter ID laws. Yet what’s happening is exactly the opposite. Your obsessive concern about the races of those affected by voter ID laws is not shared by Republicans, most Democrats, or even the minority voters themselves.

  • Lori

    Your intellectual dishonesty would be truly breathtaking if I wasn’t so used to it. I have not focused on race. I have mentioned several times in this discussion that the goal was to make it more difficult for likely Democratic voters to vote, racial minorities being among those likely Democratic voters. You are the one who brought this up. You framed it in terms of racial discrimination because you though that would give you the best “got ya”. If someone here is obsessed with race it isn’t me.

    Moving on to the substance, such as it is, of your idiocy—-the thing that Hot Air (as always, I give them credit for truth in advertising) and Townhall and Faux and you have never answered is why Republicans are so obsessed with “preventing voter fraud” when it has been demonstrated again and again and again to be a nearly non-existent problem. Why are Republicans devoting so much effort to passing laws supposedly designed to solve a non-problem? Why are Republicans spinning so madly over a non-problem? Why are Republicans claiming that these restrictive voter ID laws aren’t a problem when people who are effected by them say that they are? And yes, minorities are concerned about these laws, no matter how you hand-wave it.

    If these laws do not have a partisan motivation why are the Republicans the only ones pushing them? And no, polls do not show that Democrats are as interested in this as Republicans. These laws are a Republican thing. And it doesn’t matter how many times that you say that the GOP wants minorities to vote Republican it doesn’t matter. Minorities don’t vote Republican and that’s not looking likely to change. Because Republicans mostly treat minorities like crap.

    Let’s suppose for a moment that restrictive voter ID laws have arisen out of totally benign motives on the part of the GOP. Why are they being packaged with other voting restrictions and changes that have nothing to do with fraud and have little effect but to make it more difficult for people to vote, such as redrawing precincts, restricting absentee voting and cutting early voting hours?

  • Consumer Unit 5012

    HotAir, which cited the article I linked above, is a conservative website founded by Michelle Malkin and linked to Townhall.com. Its Editor-at-large is a frequent conservative guest on Fox News.</i"

    Thank you for the warning. I'll be sure to assume everything they print is pure, 100% weapons-grade bullshit unless proven otherwise by at least three other sources.

  • Matthias

    That comment is extremly revealing. You would do everything if it benefits you, so you expect everyone else to do the same.

    But even if you cannot imagine it there are people who want to do the right thing even if it does not benefit and won’t do something evil although they could profit from it.

  • aunursa

    You would do well not to make assumptions.
    No. I do a lot of things that don’t benefit me personally. I don’t boast about them. And my political views are not based on what benefits me personally. They are based on my values.

  • Lori

    And my political views are not based on what benefits me personally. They are based on my values.

    This is a far worse thing than I, or anyone else, has ever or could ever say about you. If you were supporting things that hurt others but benefit you personally that would be quite selfish, but at least understandable. Lots of people are selfish.

    The fact that your values are in alignment with the mean, petty, discriminatory, destructive, power-hungry polices of the GOP is so much worse than mere selfishness.

  • aunursa

    Whatever.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Oh, ~values~

    You know, Republican leaders sometimes like to refer to their particular chunk of the electorate as “values voters”.

    I leave it as an exercise for the reader to determine what that says about you.

  • Kubricks_Rube

    67% rise in Hispanic voting

    Except not so much:

    The number of Hispanic voters was greater in the 2010 election than in the 2006 election, and in the 2008 election than in the 2004 election, as the total population of registered Hispanic voters increased by 73.9 percent and 144 percent, respectively. However, there was a slight reduction in the percentage of voter turnout for Hispanics between presidential election years 2004 and 2008 and non-presidential election years 2006 and 2010.

    You cannot talk about raw turnout without considering a state’s demographic changes.

  • Nathaniel

    “As for Republicans, I assume that they do want blacks to vote — they want them to vote Republican.”

    You…assume.

    YOU ASSUME.

    Damn right you assume. You don’t check facts or go to outside sources to see if you’re right. You assume instead. How honest of you to admit it.

    Now stop being such a dishonest coward and address the article I linked to.

  • Lori

    The fact that Republicans are thus far failing at preventing blacks from voting doesn’t change the fact that

    -preventing blacks (and other likely Democratic voters) from voting is the goal of Republican-backed voter ID laws

    -trying to prevent people from voting is an asshole move

    -trying to prevent people from voting is a tacit admission that your party can’t win a fair election

    -restrictive voter ID laws ought to still be illegal

    -you are a total ass

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    That’s called a backlash dear.

  • aunursa

    No, it utterly refutes’ the Democrats’ hysterical claims that voter ID laws disproportionately prevent minority citizens from voting. Following the enactment of the voter ID law, the rate of black voters rose by 44% from 2006 to 2010, and the rate of Hispanic voters rose by 67%. The rate of white voters rose by 12%.
    People need to present a photo ID to purchase alcohol, to get a library card at many libraries, and to visit the offices of Eric Holder and Media Matters. Since most already have an ID (and the state will provide the rest with one for free,) a voter ID requirement will not prevent them from voting.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    No, it utterly refutes’ the Democrats’ hysterical claims that voter ID laws disproportionately prevent minority citizens from voting.

    Bullshit. The fact that more people pushed through regulations to vote does not mean the regulations ceased to exist or that they did not have a hindering effect, much less that they had the opposite effect, you craven liar.

  • aunursa

    Of course the law had a hindering effect. It prevented ineligible voters from having their votes count.

    Still, the law has had real and measurable effect for some voters: Since November 2008, the ballots of 1,586 Georgians didn’t count because of the law. (They arrived at the polls without a photo ID, cast provisional ballots, and did not return later with the required ID.) Overall, 13.6 million votes were cast in the state during the same period.

    Face it, voter ID is not going away. It’s here to stay. People recognize that presenting a photo ID is part of life. You need it to purchase liquor, to board a plane, to get a library card (in many locations), and to visit the offices of Eric Holder and Media Matters. The overwhelming majority of voters, including majorities of Democrats, support voter ID laws. The laws don’t disenfranchise minority voters, and those hysterical claims will continue to be rejected by the public.

  • Lori

    Of course the law had a hindering effect. It prevented ineligible voters from having their votes count.

    Does the GOP pay you to repeat their bullshit talking points or do you do it for free?

  • Nathaniel

    Right, because getting out a library book is a right that people marched and were killed for. Thanks for putting things in perspective for this stupid liberal.

    Wait wait, no. That’s not being honest. I want to be honest. Being dishonest would mean sharing something with you, and it already fills me with shame that I share Judaism with you.

    So here’s me being honest: You are a lying toad who delights in adopting a false reasonableness in an attempt to claim an aggrieved high ground against us “hysterical” liberals. And the really sad thing is that we all have more awareness of that than you do.

    Seek professional help.

  • aunursa

    L’Shana Tova! May you have a blessed year.

  • Nathaniel

    Still haven’t addressed my article, cowardly petaQ.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Oh my god you’re as bad as Ginny Bain Allen with her happy-clappy ^_^ BLESS YOU DEARIE IN THE NAME OF JESUS even as she’s off bashing gay people or something.

    (I mean seriously, it takes some chutzpah to toss off that kind of happy-clappy greeting to someone who’s just told you they aren’t real happy with you)

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    Can we stop this? The whole equating “holding positions I don’t like” with “needs medical care”.

    Because I know plenty of people with mental illness who hold political positions I DO like, and I don’t think they’re just exceptional or something. They are people who reason, and they used their reasoning to reach the same conclusions I have. Just as aunursa is a person who reasons, and has reached the opposite conclusions.

    You can feel zie is a jackwagon devoid of empathy and compassion, you can feel that zie’s an idiot, or a self serving lying toad, but zie’s mental health state is irrelevant.

  • P J Evans

    All 0.01 percent of them.

    Every case (and there have been maybe six) I’ve heard of where someone voted fraudulently was a Republican. Voter fraud is very, very rare. Voter registration fraud is also very rare.
    Why are Republicans so afraid of people voting?

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    I notice you don’t comment on eliminating preregistration, cutting back early voting, eliminating polling stations, restricting the ability of students to vote from dorm addresses and eliminating programs intended to help them get registered, requiring women who change their names (what often happens when a woman gets married or divorced?) fill in a substitute ballot and then provide further proof of identity…

    “The reduction in the number of days allowed for early voting is particularly important because early voting plays a major role in Obama’s ground game. The Democrats carried most states that allow many days of early voting, and Obama’s national field director admitted, shortly before last year’s election, that ‘early voting is giving us a solid lead in the battleground states that will decide this election.’

    “The Obama technocrats have developed an efficient system of identifying prospective Obama voters and then nagging them (some might say harassing them) until they actually vote. It may take several days to accomplish this, so early voting is an essential component of the Democrats’ get-out-the-vote campaign.” –Phyllis Schlafly

  • aunursa

    I notice you don’t comment on eliminating preregistration
    That’s correct, I don’t have the time to respond to every single point by every single commenter. When I’m 1 against 10, I pick and choose which points to respond to and the immediate topic is voter ID. I’m happy to discuss any of the other election topics with anyone who emails me at aunursa (at) Comcast (dot) net.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Piss off, you pathetic troll.

  • P J Evans

    Like the NC county that consolidated three precincts (including the local college) into one, which is a mile from the campus by streets with no sidewalks and has 9300 voters and 35 parking places.
    That’s trying really hard to disenfranchise or at least discourage would-be voters, particularly ones who might possibly be inclined to not for for asshole Republicans like the ones who consolidated the precincts.

  • Lori

    At least the GOP head of a NC county election board wasn’t able to declare students ineligible to run for office, and by extension to vote in local elections, using an on-campus address.

    http://hamptonroads.com/2013/09/ecsu-student-allowed-run-city-council

  • Donalbain

    Voting.
    Buying booze,

    Which of those is the defining right of a citizen of a country, one which we should be encouraging people to do?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Oh wow 1586 people

    Out of a total eligible electorate of how many? You know, didn’t Republicans insist on these new laws because they claimed an absolute avalanche of ballots were being cast by people who shouldn’t have voted? 1586/some huge number doesn’t really strike me as much proof of some mythical wall of people just slavering at the chance to vote illegitimately.

    And how many ineligible ballots were tossed in the years prior to the new laws?

  • aunursa

    Out of a total eligible electorate of how many?
    .
    About 13.6 million voted in Georgia.
    .
    1586/some huge number doesn’t really strike me as much proof of some mythical wall of people just slavering at the chance to vote illegitimately.
    .
    Even one ineligible vote dilutes the effect of every eligible voter’s choices. And there are several documented cases of elections being decided by one vote.

    .
    The 2008 Minnesota Senate election was plagued by allegations of voter fraud. Republicans allege that more than 1000 felons voted and more than 100 people were convicted of voter fraud in an election decided by 312 votes. This election ultimately affected the passage of the ACA; had the Republican won, the ACA would not have passed.
    .
    So yes, illegitimate votes do matter, and they do affect elections, and the results do affect the lives of people beyond the particular state or municipality.

  • Lori

    Even one ineligible vote dilutes the effect of every eligible voter’s choices.

    This high blown rhetoric would be a lot more impressive if you were half as concerned about the fact that making it difficult to vote results in eligible voters not getting to vote and the way that dilutes their choices.

    The 2008 Minnesota Senate election was plagued by allegations of voter fraud.

    Allegations of fraud don’t prove fraud, especially in a hotly contested election that the GOP lost.

    Republicans allege that more than 1000 felons voted

    Again, Republican allegations aren’t all that impressive. However, I’ll play along. If the GOP is so hot to pass legislation setting new rules for voting let’s talk about the issue of permanently stripping felons of their right to vote. There’s no good reason for that. It’s total bullshit. Is the GOP willing to take a more reasonable approach to this issue?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    The very fact that there are detection mechanisms since well before this much-vaunted Republican desire to ensure the integrity of every vote means that your much-overblown fatuous rhetoric about an omgillegalvote deciding an election by one vote such that it cascades down the valley of floor votes in Congress is just that. Overblown fatuous rhetoric.

    Or did you forget that the ACA was passed under reconciliation rules, which only needed 51 senators not 60? (there were 57 Democratic senators at the time)

    AND it went back to the House which is where it was finally passed and *there*, the Dems had 255 seats and reconciliation rules meant only 218 votes were needed.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    (1586 / 13600000) * 100 = 0.01166%

    Do you know how small 0.01% is? Literally? Grab yourself ten thousand bucks and then take one dollar out of it.

    That is 0.01%.

  • Lori

    No, it utterly refutes’ the Democrats’ hysterical claims that voter ID
    laws disproportionately prevent minority citizens from voting.

    I’m once again asking myself, “Is aunursa actually this logic-deficient or does he just get perverse satisfaction from playing the moron on the internet?”

  • Shaenon K. Garrity

    I don’t think he holds any political position more coherent than, “Does it piss off those sissy liberals? Then I’m for it!”

    I mean, he can’t actually think the reinstatement of Jim Crow voting laws is either morally defensible or pragmatically a good idea. Can he? It has to be just another funny little “ha, ha, THIS will get liberals mad, they’re so stupid and girly they actually CARE about stuff!” game to him.

    Please reassure me that it is.

  • Lori

    I have no idea. He says that he votes his values, but I have no idea what values he’s referring to. Could be pissing off liberals. Could be power at any cost. Could be disenfranchising people who don’t agree with him. Could be a few other things.

    Any one of them says something very bad about him, but they all say a different bad thing. Your guess is as good as anyone’s.

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    Being homeless prevents you from getting an ID.

  • aunursa

    If the Democrats were smart, rather than object to voter ID laws that are hugely popular among most of the electorate, they would see the writing on the wall, drop their objections, and instead support voter ID laws with the provision that such laws must include provisions to assist those eligible voters who have difficulties obtaining a valid ID, such as the homeless, so that they can obtain an ID.
    .
    But I don’t expect that the Democrats are smart concerning this issue. Rather, I expect that they will continue to gnash their teeth and scream bloody murder as voter ID laws are enacted around the country.

  • Lori

    This is your answer to everything. According to you the smart thing for the Democrats to do is whatever the Republicans want. Funny that.

  • aunursa

    You must be thinking of a different Republican Party. The Republicans I know have no interest in getting homeless voters to the polls or providing them with photo IDs. Same for getting most college students to vote.

  • Lori

    No, Republicans certainly don’t care about helping people to vote. They love low voter turn-out, which says a great deal about the party and about its supporters, including you. You cry crocodile tears over diluting the votes of eligible voters while hoping for low turn-out.

    My point, which you are willfully misunderstanding, is that if I had a dollar for every time you said some version of “If the Democrats were smart they’d give in to Republican demands” I’d have a lot of dollars. It was never an impressive argument and over-use has rendered it extremely tiresome.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    The Republicans I know have no interest in getting homeless voters to the polls or providing them with photo IDs.

    I’m shocked, you actually admit Republicans favor a lower voter turnout.

    I do believe I felt a sudden waft of cold arise up from the floor.

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    So how EXACTLY do you propose valid IDs for people without valid addresses?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Magical bootstraps, on sale from your friendly Republican politician for $19.99 in six convenient monthly payments.

  • drkrick

    It’s a GOP government initiative. Of course it’s not going to work as intended.

  • aunursa

    Actually it worked precisely as intended.

    Still, the law has had real and measurable effect for some voters: Since November 2008, the ballots of 1,586 Georgians didn’t count because of the law. (They arrived at the polls without a photo ID, cast provisional ballots, and did not return later with the required ID.) Overall, 13.6 million votes were cast in the state during the same period.

  • Lori

    You are either very stupid or you have no compunction about lying in a really obvious way. The law was not intended to prevent voter fraud. Voter fraud is all but non-existent. It was intended to prevent people from voting who are likely to vote against Republicans. If it’s not doing that then the GOP has failed in its mission.

  • aunursa

    Your repeated assertion about the intent of the law is irrelevant. The fact is that voter ID laws do not disproportionately prevent minority voters from voting, as the Democrats have falsely claimed. Americans overwhelmingly support voter ID laws across all demographic lines. Even 65% of self-described liberals support them (Oh NO! Another poll citation!) Face it — voter ID laws are not going away — they are here to stay.

  • Lori

    Your repeated assertions about the effect of these laws, and that fact that you have (surprise, surprise) trotted out another poll does not change the fact that restrictive voter ID laws are wrong.

    Face it — voter ID laws are not going away — they are here to stay.

    First of all, could there be a more perfect representation of what’s wrong with the GOP and with your support of it? “We got our way and there’s nothing you can do about it! Suck it!!!”

    Second, it’s true that restrictive voter ID laws will almost certainly stand, but only until the current balance of power on SCOTUS tips away from Republicans. The laws are wrong and at some point we’ll once again have Justices who care about that. The “permanent Republican majority” is the pipe dream of wanna-be dictators, not an inevitability.

  • Emcee, cubed

    You do realize that this doesn’t actually prove anything other than 1,586 people had their votes discounted because of an arbitrary law, right? I mean, no where does it say that those people were ineligible to vote. Just that they didn’t return with ID. I can think of numerous reasons off the top of my head as to why that might happen that have nothing to do with being ineligible. Maybe they didn’t have a ride back to the polls at a later time. Maybe they couldn’t find it when they went back for it. Maybe their candidate was so far ahead, or so far behind, that they didn’t feel it was that important. Maybe they were just lazy, which while not an admirable quality, shouldn’t be a reason not to have one’s vote counted.

  • aunursa

    All of the reasons you cite assume that the provisional voters have valid IDs that they could have presented on Election Day. Like the 13.6 million Georgia voters who did remember to bring their IDs with them to the polls.

  • Lori

    And your gloating assumes that they did not. Actual evidence backs up Emcee, cubed.

  • aunursa

    Heads I win, tails you lose. If I’m right, then the voter ID law worked as intended. If Emcee is right, then the voter ID law still worked as intended. The provisional voters had two chances to vote: once on Election Day, had they shown their ID, and again afterward. Millions of their fellow Georgians were responsible enough to have their ID with them. Based on the 2012 Pennsylvania election, I expect that there were plenty of reminders to Georgia voters that they would need to show valid ID.

  • Lori

    I guess this answers my earlier question—you really are this logic deficient.

  • Emcee, cubed

    So you admit that the purpose of the law is to keep the votes of people without a photo ID from counting. And those people are primarily students, minorities, the poor and the elderly. You’ve just proven everyone else’s point.

  • Emcee, cubed

    And again, if they didn’t? Why should they be ineligible to vote? This is where you always come up short. Not having a photo ID shouldn’t make you ineligible to vote. There are huge numbers of people in every state who fit every requirement to vote, except they don’t have photo ID (or in the case of students, valid photo ID, since most of these laws won’t accept a college ID for voting.) It is an arbitrary requirement, with no actual need or meaning.

  • Lori

    Actually it worked precisely as intended.

    You should take this up with the Florida GOP

    Former GOP chair, governor – both on outs with party – say voter fraud wasn’t a concern, but reducing Democratic votes was

    http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/early-voting-curbs-called-power-play/nTFDy/

    Also Phyllis Schlafly:

    http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2013/08/26/20197189-how-not-to-defend-voter-suppression-in-north-carolina

    You should probably have a chat with Pennsylvania’s GOP chairman too:

    http://www.nationalmemo.com/pennsylvania-gop-chief-admits-voter-id-laws-suppressed-democratic-vote-in-2012/

  • aunursa

    Crist is a Republican turned Democrat. Would you blindly accept the assertions made by a Democrat turned Republican about his former party? Schlafly is discussing early voting, not voter ID. The PA article doesn’t indicate whether he believes the voter ID dissuaded eligible voters or ineligible voters. He could be saying that the vote ID law reduced the Democratic vote totals because ineligible voters whom he believes vote overwhelmingly Democratic were prevented from voting.
    Nice try.

  • Lori

    This is not an issue of blindly accepting anything. Crist has reasons for being a Republican turned Democrat. Some of them are personal and some of them are about policy. This is one of the things about policy.

    Schlafly is discussing doing things to make it more difficult for Democrats to vote in order to increase the chances of Republicans winning elections.

    If Rob Gleason believed that ineligible voters were overwhelmingly Democrats and he thought he had hope in hell of proving it, he would have said that. He didn’t.

    You wouldn’t know “nice try” if it bit you in the ass.

  • P J Evans

    and at least one Republican has said that he’s against abortion because those kids would have grown up to vote Republican. (Yes, the lack of logic there is astonishing.)

  • Lori

    Because Republicans never get abortions? What?

    You don’t have to be totally batshit to be a Republican, but it’s clearly not a disqualifier either.

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    Over 1500 people had their votes invalidated because they couldn’t find the means to RETURN to the voting booth, and you think that’s something to celebrate.

    Nice.

  • P J Evans

    In a sane country, they’d have gotten provisional ballots and not had to come back. Not that photo ID should be required – you have to sign the voter roll anyway, if you’re voting in person, and sign the ballot if you’re not.

  • Wednesday

    #3: The Republican definition of “voter fraud” is “black people trying to vote.”

    And college students of all races voting where they go to school.

    Not to be all “whaa white people suffer too”, but in college towns, sometimes The Horrible Liberal College Students are considered more of a threat than racial minorities. Because they’re liberal! And live three whole months with their parents (unless they stay for the summer), so they should totally be voting there, rather than mucking up our local election by voting for candidates who support more state funding for higher education or protections for tenants or things that, you know, actually affect students while they are attending school out here.

  • Vermic

    The Azathoth monument brightened my day, and I honestly believe that subversive, well-realized pranks like this one make our society a better place. Do your part: practice random chaos and senseless acts of Lovecraft today.

  • Yuyu

    Did Azathoth place unkillable blood worms in Oklahoma’s water supply? Of course not, that’d be ridiculous!

    This is *obviously* the work of the Mi-Go.

  • Rakka

    Nope, it’s Nyarlathotep. He’s the one who takes delight in frightening and baffling people, as simply driving them mad would be boring.

  • Jessica_R

    I’m from NC so it’s both incredibly depressing to see how quickly Art Pope turned The Tarheel State into his private Neo Feudalistic playground and heartening to see how quickly the Moral Mondays movement has responded. It won’t be easy but NC citizens aren’t going quietly.

  • LL

    RE the Pope link: I’ve never quite understood how students are not considered residents. Aren’t you a resident of someplace if you maintain a residence there and live there some interval of time? In Texas, you’re a resident if you’ve lived there at least 30 days and have a residential address (which I guess means a house or apartment, as opposed to a hotel).

    I know I’m giving these assholes (the anti-student people) too much benefit of the doubt, but I have yet to hear an explanation of how students are not residents who are eligible to vote. Or do anything else a non-student resident would be able to do legally. Like drive. And pay taxes. And pay tuition to the state (if they’re attending a state university).

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I don’t know how it works but some states play games with this where you can be considered resident for the purposes of voting but not for the purposes of accessing lowered in-state tuition.

  • P J Evans

    California requires that you have a permanent residence to qualify for resident fees. I think you have to be a resident for at least a year. (My brother had to deal with this when he came back after two years in NY.)

  • Wednesday

    Soo… the issue of state residence is complicated. You can choose to maintain your Official Residence in a state you aren’t actually spending much time in so long as you pay taxes there as well as any states you’re earning income in.

    For example, I went to college in CA but maintained my homestate residency. (I was terrified of LA drivers, so didn’t change my residency in part because I’d have to take the driving test.) This meant I kept my homestate drivers’ license, voting registration, and payed taxes there as well as at in CA.

    As a consequence, though, I had to pay money to vote in one election. Not fifty cents for a stamp, but a good $40 or so. The senate candidate I had voted for died suddenly shortly before the election; getting my replacement absentee ballot counted required my spending $ to get the new ballot express-mailed to me and then express-mailed back to the county.

  • Lori

    I was terrified of LA drivers, so didn’t change my residency in part because I’d have to take the driving test.

    When was this? When I moved to CA I got a CA driver’s license by turning in my previous valid license and taking the written exam. I never had to take a driving test.

  • P J Evans

    When I moved back to CA from Texas, I only had to do that much,. And because I’d been out of CA for less than 5 years, I got my same license number back (which I really hadn’t expected). (Texas required that I have TX car insurance before I could get a Texas license.)

  • Jamoche

    A hotel worked for George Bush when he claimed to be a Texas resident for tax purposes back in the early 90s.

    But that was a different Texas that still thought the Bushes were Yankees.

  • banancat

    In a way, I’m on board with the hotel residence because it can empower people who have lost their homes and are on the border of homelessness. Somehow I doubt this rule is applied consistently in the favor of disenfranchised people though.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Because they’re not land-holding men.

    Well, that might actually be more truth than satire. In the 2008 election in Michigan and Ohio, the Republican party tried to argue that anyone who’d had a foreclosure wasn’t an eligible citizen of the state and should not be permitted to vote.

    (This is actually illegal as hell, but hey, Republicans.)

  • Turcano

    One question that I would like to see answered is whether Al Mohler was one of the original members of the 1964 GOP anti-Communist caucus or just one of their hatchet-men.

  • reynard61

    Just in case no one’s said it yet: “Bloodworms for the Bloodworm god!!!”

  • Ahab

    Heh heh. Who knew that Khorne’s portfolio included parasites?

  • Kagi Soracia

    1) Thank you for calling out IHOP and it’s ideology – I know personally a number of people who were involved in it’s inception, some who are still there, and many of my siblings have been through it’s various ‘discipleship’ programs. My family has been involved with the church that birthed it for a long time and that ministry in particular from the ground up. My father ran the associated Topeka House of Prayer for a number of years, as well. It’s toxic, all of it. I hate everything it stands for.

    7) I’m not entirely sure what your criteria are for your blogroll lists, but if you’re just collecting any and all you’re welcome to add mine if you like; I’m a gay christianish liberal woman from the midwest, and a recovering homeschooler.

  • Steve Buchheit

    “a complete kneebiter.” I saw what you did there.


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