7 things @ 9 o’clock (9.4)

1. “The International House of Prayer (IHOP), a New Apostolic Reformation ministry in Kansas City, Missouri, now has a ministry devoted to the workplace,” the Republic of Gilead reports. “The Joseph Company encourages believers to ‘make an impact for Jesus’ in the sphere of society in which they work.”

When these folks talk about making “an impact for Jesus,” they tend to mean it the way Constantine did. That name — “Joseph Company” — tells you all you need to know about IHOP. They’re faithful servants of Pharaoh, his loyal right-hand man, working hard to consolidate all power under his imperial throne to fulfill their ideal of “dominion” over all the seven pyramids. (Haven’t these people ever read the story of Joseph? It’s not a how-to manual, it’s the set-up for Exodus.)

2. It’s hard to believe that it’s been 20 years since Al Mohler set back Southern Baptist theological education by 60 years in the Great Purge when he took over as Southern’s seminary president. It was the academic equivalent of one of those Florida Marlins fire sales, except instead of unloading salary, Mohler was unloading credibility. Still, what remains a shameful debacle for Southern Baptists turned out to be a blessing for theology students all over the country, as nearly all of the supposedly apostate professors Mohler purged at Southern have gone on to great success, making impressive contributions elsewhere by doing the sort of work that Mohler would not allow and that he has worked hard to ensure no Southern Baptist is capable of.

3. Art Pope is a jerk. Art Pope is a jackwagon.

Yes, it’s sad to be reduced to name-calling. But, alas, Pope’s money insulates him from all other forms of accountability — political, legal, civil, moral, religious, cultural. And thus the only remaining check against the unchecked power of someone like Art Pope is ridicule and name-calling. There’s no way for the people of North Carolina to stop him from ruling their state like a monarch and from turning their democracy into a Pope-ocracy. All that is left is to try to make him a punchline and an object of universal scorn.

So, then. Ahem. Art Pope is a jerk, a complete kneebiter.

4. Our friend Mark Kessler, the “chief” of the one-man police force of Gilberton, Pa., has now been suspended indefinitely due to those violent, profane, racist YouTube videos he keeps posting in which he threatens to kill “libtards” and overthrow the government. Kessler remains a member of the local school board, however, still helping to shape the education of Gilberton’s children.

5. Here’s a depressing follow-up on an earlier piece of Good News. Remember “Operation Cross Country” — the massive FBI sting that “rescued 105 youth and arrested 150 pimps for prostitution in 76 cities”? Turns out that in many of those cases, being “rescued” involved getting handcuffed and arrested. Liberation: UR doing it wrong.

6. People laughed, assuming it was just a prank, when a monument to one of H.P. Lovecraft’s Old Ones appeared outside of an Oklahoma City restaurant. “In the Year of Our Lord 2012 Creer Pipi claimed this land for Azathoth,” the monument reads. I laughed too — until I learned that unkillable blood worms were infecting Oklahoma’s water supply. “You can take the worms out of the filter system and put them in a straight cup of bleach and leave them in there for about four hours, and they still won’t die.” Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn ...

7. Here’s an update on those blog-list tabs above: The Christian QUILTBlogs list includes 114 blogs. The Mosaic lists 242 blogs by Christians of color. And the Bonfire is spreading out of control. It now lists 2,031 blogs written by Christian women.

 

 

  • aunursa

    Tonight begins Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. It is rare for Rosh Hashanah to occur this early in the Gregorian Calendar. The last time that Rosh Hashanah began on September 4th was in 1899, and the next time will be in 2089.
    The new year is 5774. To my Jewish friends: L’Shana Tova!

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Thanks, Fred. Now I’ll never be able to look at water the same way again. D-X

    4. Our friend Mark Kessler, the “chief” of the one-man police force of Gilberton, Pa., has now been suspended indefinitely due to those violent, profane, racist YouTube videos he keeps posting in which he threatens to kill “libtards” and overthrow the government. Kessler remains a member of the local school board, however, still helping to shape the education of Gilberton’s children.

    Well, at least one good thing today! It seems the Joe Arpaio wannabes north of the Mason-Dixon don’t quite get the same hero-worship as Arpaio.

    5. Here’s a depressing follow-up on an earlier piece of
    Good News. Remember “Operation Cross Country” — the massive FBI sting
    that “rescued 105 youth and arrested 150 pimps for prostitution in 76
    cities”? Turns out that in many of those cases, being “rescued” involved
    getting handcuffed and arrested. Liberation: UR doing it wrong.

    This sort of thing is why prostitution ought to be legalized and brought under the aegis of medical supervision.

    This kind of “lock ‘em up” attitude to what might be termed ‘moral offences’ (drugs and sex) really doesn’t attack the root problem, and just as drug decriminalization and treating addiction as a medical issue rather than a criminal issue is probably better, so too would treating prostitution as a component of society to be made safe as possible for prostitutes themselves.

  • Ahab

    Thanks for the Republic of Gilead shout-out!

  • Michael Pullmann

    How has International House of Prayer not been sued for calling themselves IHOP?

  • Jeff Weskamp

    #1: Remember kids, the Bible says that our employers and political leaders must be given blind, unthinking obedience…. unless they happen to be Democrats.

    #3: The Republican definition of “voter fraud” is “black people trying to vote.”

    #6: Am I the only one who thinks this sounds like something from a Welcome to Night Vale podcast?

  • Ahab

    In the past, International House of Prayer and International House of Pancakes fought over the IHOP acronym.

    http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/09/16/ihop.lawsuit/index.html

  • Shay Guy

    Umetukah. :)

  • Shay Guy

    Thanks, Fred. Now I’ll never be able to look at water the same way again. D-X

    “Water is patient, Adelaide. Water just waits. It wears down the clifftops, the mountains, the whole of the world. Water always wins.”

  • aunursa

    #3: The Republican definition of “voter fraud” is “black people trying to vote.”

    Minority turnout increased dramatically after Georgia voter-ID law

  • Kubricks_Rube

    I’m looking forward to lighting the menorah on Thanksgiving this year.

  • connorboone

    And that makes voter identification requirements right because…?

  • Nathaniel

    The aunursa non-sequitur of the day! Because obviously if black people are still voting means Republicans haven’t been trying to turn down minority election turn out.

    Here’s a headline for you to chew on:

    Tea Partier Admits Republicans Don’t Want African Americans To Vote. No Sh*t.

    http://thedailybanter.com/2013/06/tea-partier-admits-republicans-dont-want-african-americans-to-vote-no-sht/

    Tell me how that means Republicans don’t want black people to vote. I won’t hold my breath though. Your outstanding trait is your smug cowardice.

  • Vermic

    The Azathoth monument brightened my day, and I honestly believe that subversive, well-realized pranks like this one make our society a better place. Do your part: practice random chaos and senseless acts of Lovecraft today.

  • Lori

    What creates a more epic food coma than Thanksgiving? Thanksnukkah!

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    That’s called a backlash dear.

  • aunursa

    No, it utterly refutes’ the Democrats’ hysterical claims that voter ID laws disproportionately prevent minority citizens from voting. Following the enactment of the voter ID law, the rate of black voters rose by 44% from 2006 to 2010, and the rate of Hispanic voters rose by 67%. The rate of white voters rose by 12%.
    People need to present a photo ID to purchase alcohol, to get a library card at many libraries, and to visit the offices of Eric Holder and Media Matters. Since most already have an ID (and the state will provide the rest with one for free,) a voter ID requirement will not prevent them from voting.

  • drkrick

    It’s a GOP government initiative. Of course it’s not going to work as intended.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    No, it utterly refutes’ the Democrats’ hysterical claims that voter ID laws disproportionately prevent minority citizens from voting.

    Bullshit. The fact that more people pushed through regulations to vote does not mean the regulations ceased to exist or that they did not have a hindering effect, much less that they had the opposite effect, you craven liar.

  • aunursa

    Because obviously if black people are still voting means Republicans haven’t been trying to turn down minority election turn out.
    If black people are still voting — with dramatically increased rates (even when Obama is not on the ballot,) it means that voter ID requirements don’t prevent minority voters from voting.
    As for Republicans, I assume that they do want blacks to vote — they want them to vote Republican.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    And as long as there is at least one Horatio Alger story come true, that means that every poor American can become a millionaire as long as they work diligently and keep their head down.

  • aunursa

    Actually it worked precisely as intended.

    Still, the law has had real and measurable effect for some voters: Since November 2008, the ballots of 1,586 Georgians didn’t count because of the law. (They arrived at the polls without a photo ID, cast provisional ballots, and did not return later with the required ID.) Overall, 13.6 million votes were cast in the state during the same period.

  • Yuyu

    Did Azathoth place unkillable blood worms in Oklahoma’s water supply? Of course not, that’d be ridiculous!

    This is *obviously* the work of the Mi-Go.

  • aunursa

    A 44% rise in black voting, 67% rise in Hispanic voting. That’s a lot of “Horatio Alger” voters.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    So clearly if you threaten people with disenfranchising and they stand up to oppose you, the threat of disenfranchising doesn’t exist because it didn’t work. Every story in which a villain has threatened someone who then defeated them stands as a monument to the fact that villainy isn’t a credible threat.

    Your intellectual dishonesty is sickening. Shame on you.

  • Nathaniel

    “As for Republicans, I assume that they do want blacks to vote — they want them to vote Republican.”

    You…assume.

    YOU ASSUME.

    Damn right you assume. You don’t check facts or go to outside sources to see if you’re right. You assume instead. How honest of you to admit it.

    Now stop being such a dishonest coward and address the article I linked to.

  • Lori

    The fact that Republicans are thus far failing at preventing blacks from voting doesn’t change the fact that

    -preventing blacks (and other likely Democratic voters) from voting is the goal of Republican-backed voter ID laws

    -trying to prevent people from voting is an asshole move

    -trying to prevent people from voting is a tacit admission that your party can’t win a fair election

    -restrictive voter ID laws ought to still be illegal

    -you are a total ass

  • Lori

    That’s a lot of pissed off voters. The fact that Republicans miscalculated doesn’t change their intent.

    The GOP—evil and stupid.

  • aunursa

    Of course the law had a hindering effect. It prevented ineligible voters from having their votes count.

    Still, the law has had real and measurable effect for some voters: Since November 2008, the ballots of 1,586 Georgians didn’t count because of the law. (They arrived at the polls without a photo ID, cast provisional ballots, and did not return later with the required ID.) Overall, 13.6 million votes were cast in the state during the same period.

    Face it, voter ID is not going away. It’s here to stay. People recognize that presenting a photo ID is part of life. You need it to purchase liquor, to board a plane, to get a library card (in many locations), and to visit the offices of Eric Holder and Media Matters. The overwhelming majority of voters, including majorities of Democrats, support voter ID laws. The laws don’t disenfranchise minority voters, and those hysterical claims will continue to be rejected by the public.

  • Lori

    No, it utterly refutes’ the Democrats’ hysterical claims that voter ID
    laws disproportionately prevent minority citizens from voting.

    I’m once again asking myself, “Is aunursa actually this logic-deficient or does he just get perverse satisfaction from playing the moron on the internet?”

  • Lori

    Of course the law had a hindering effect. It prevented ineligible voters from having their votes count.

    Does the GOP pay you to repeat their bullshit talking points or do you do it for free?

  • aunursa

    If that were the case, then the Democrats would surreptitiously support voter ID laws everywhere.
    Brer Democrat: Oh no, whatever you do, Brer Republican, don’t you dare enact that racist voter ID laws.
    Think of all those pissed off voters.

  • Nathaniel

    Right, because getting out a library book is a right that people marched and were killed for. Thanks for putting things in perspective for this stupid liberal.

    Wait wait, no. That’s not being honest. I want to be honest. Being dishonest would mean sharing something with you, and it already fills me with shame that I share Judaism with you.

    So here’s me being honest: You are a lying toad who delights in adopting a false reasonableness in an attempt to claim an aggrieved high ground against us “hysterical” liberals. And the really sad thing is that we all have more awareness of that than you do.

    Seek professional help.

  • Lori

    You are either very stupid or you have no compunction about lying in a really obvious way. The law was not intended to prevent voter fraud. Voter fraud is all but non-existent. It was intended to prevent people from voting who are likely to vote against Republicans. If it’s not doing that then the GOP has failed in its mission.

  • Lori

    No, Democrats would not support voter ID laws, surreptitiously or otherwise. Because they’re wrong.

    I realize that when it comes to elections the GOP doesn’t ask “Is this right or wrong?” much any more, preferring instead to focus on “Do we think this will make it easier for us to get and maintain power?”, but not everyone is like that.

  • aunursa

    Your repeated assertion about the intent of the law is irrelevant. The fact is that voter ID laws do not disproportionately prevent minority voters from voting, as the Democrats have falsely claimed. Americans overwhelmingly support voter ID laws across all demographic lines. Even 65% of self-described liberals support them (Oh NO! Another poll citation!) Face it — voter ID laws are not going away — they are here to stay.

  • aunursa

    L’Shana Tova! May you have a blessed year.

  • P J Evans

    All 0.01 percent of them.

    Every case (and there have been maybe six) I’ve heard of where someone voted fraudulently was a Republican. Voter fraud is very, very rare. Voter registration fraud is also very rare.
    Why are Republicans so afraid of people voting?

  • Kubricks_Rube

    67% rise in Hispanic voting

    Except not so much:

    The number of Hispanic voters was greater in the 2010 election than in the 2006 election, and in the 2008 election than in the 2004 election, as the total population of registered Hispanic voters increased by 73.9 percent and 144 percent, respectively. However, there was a slight reduction in the percentage of voter turnout for Hispanics between presidential election years 2004 and 2008 and non-presidential election years 2006 and 2010.

    You cannot talk about raw turnout without considering a state’s demographic changes.

  • Matthias

    That comment is extremly revealing. You would do everything if it benefits you, so you expect everyone else to do the same.

    But even if you cannot imagine it there are people who want to do the right thing even if it does not benefit and won’t do something evil although they could profit from it.

  • Lori

    Your repeated assertions about the effect of these laws, and that fact that you have (surprise, surprise) trotted out another poll does not change the fact that restrictive voter ID laws are wrong.

    Face it — voter ID laws are not going away — they are here to stay.

    First of all, could there be a more perfect representation of what’s wrong with the GOP and with your support of it? “We got our way and there’s nothing you can do about it! Suck it!!!”

    Second, it’s true that restrictive voter ID laws will almost certainly stand, but only until the current balance of power on SCOTUS tips away from Republicans. The laws are wrong and at some point we’ll once again have Justices who care about that. The “permanent Republican majority” is the pipe dream of wanna-be dictators, not an inevitability.

  • Emcee, cubed

    You do realize that this doesn’t actually prove anything other than 1,586 people had their votes discounted because of an arbitrary law, right? I mean, no where does it say that those people were ineligible to vote. Just that they didn’t return with ID. I can think of numerous reasons off the top of my head as to why that might happen that have nothing to do with being ineligible. Maybe they didn’t have a ride back to the polls at a later time. Maybe they couldn’t find it when they went back for it. Maybe their candidate was so far ahead, or so far behind, that they didn’t feel it was that important. Maybe they were just lazy, which while not an admirable quality, shouldn’t be a reason not to have one’s vote counted.

  • aunursa

    No one is being threatened with disenfranchisement. No one is trying to prevent eligible voters from voting. The villains you fear are in your own mind.

  • aunursa

    You would do well not to make assumptions.
    No. I do a lot of things that don’t benefit me personally. I don’t boast about them. And my political views are not based on what benefits me personally. They are based on my values.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    I notice you don’t comment on eliminating preregistration, cutting back early voting, eliminating polling stations, restricting the ability of students to vote from dorm addresses and eliminating programs intended to help them get registered, requiring women who change their names (what often happens when a woman gets married or divorced?) fill in a substitute ballot and then provide further proof of identity…

    “The reduction in the number of days allowed for early voting is particularly important because early voting plays a major role in Obama’s ground game. The Democrats carried most states that allow many days of early voting, and Obama’s national field director admitted, shortly before last year’s election, that ‘early voting is giving us a solid lead in the battleground states that will decide this election.’

    “The Obama technocrats have developed an efficient system of identifying prospective Obama voters and then nagging them (some might say harassing them) until they actually vote. It may take several days to accomplish this, so early voting is an essential component of the Democrats’ get-out-the-vote campaign.” –Phyllis Schlafly

  • Lori

    Actually it worked precisely as intended.

    You should take this up with the Florida GOP

    Former GOP chair, governor – both on outs with party – say voter fraud wasn’t a concern, but reducing Democratic votes was

    http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/early-voting-curbs-called-power-play/nTFDy/

    Also Phyllis Schlafly:

    http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2013/08/26/20197189-how-not-to-defend-voter-suppression-in-north-carolina

    You should probably have a chat with Pennsylvania’s GOP chairman too:

    http://www.nationalmemo.com/pennsylvania-gop-chief-admits-voter-id-laws-suppressed-democratic-vote-in-2012/

  • aunursa

    All of the reasons you cite assume that the provisional voters have valid IDs that they could have presented on Election Day. Like the 13.6 million Georgia voters who did remember to bring their IDs with them to the polls.

  • Lori

    And my political views are not based on what benefits me personally. They are based on my values.

    This is a far worse thing than I, or anyone else, has ever or could ever say about you. If you were supporting things that hurt others but benefit you personally that would be quite selfish, but at least understandable. Lots of people are selfish.

    The fact that your values are in alignment with the mean, petty, discriminatory, destructive, power-hungry polices of the GOP is so much worse than mere selfishness.

  • Lori

    And your gloating assumes that they did not. Actual evidence backs up Emcee, cubed.

  • Lori

    No one is trying to prevent eligible voters from voting.

    Again, multiple people in positions of power within the GOP have admitted that this is not the case. They’re not lying about it. Why are you?

  • aunursa

    Crist is a Republican turned Democrat. Would you blindly accept the assertions made by a Democrat turned Republican about his former party? Schlafly is discussing early voting, not voter ID. The PA article doesn’t indicate whether he believes the voter ID dissuaded eligible voters or ineligible voters. He could be saying that the vote ID law reduced the Democratic vote totals because ineligible voters whom he believes vote overwhelmingly Democratic were prevented from voting.
    Nice try.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X