Who do you say that I am?: Putting the ‘post-’ in ‘post-evangelical’ (part 1)

LydiaBean

American evangelicals changed the way they answer the question “Who do we say that we are?” And that means, inevitably, that they have also — consciously or not — changed the way they answer the question “Who do you say that I am?” For Christians, that’s a rather important question. Changing our answer to that bedrock question shouldn’t be something that happens without serious, conscious consideration. And yet that’s what happened. [Read more...]

Qoheleth and the ‘Third Way’

Balance

We need other options if we want to escape from the miserable binaries that Qoheleth describes so well. But the language to describe such options has been co-opted by “Third Way” talk that advocates the unprincipled, obsequious “centrism” of a Joe Lieberman for President brochure. [Read more...]

Slightly different construct, same function

Abdelkader

Both of those scripts — the “Muslim-on-Muslim violence” narrative that mirrors our American “black-on-black violence” narrative, and the fearful “Clash of civilizations” narrative that projects inherent menace a la “Birth of a Nation” — require us to view Muslims as Other, and as essentially inferior. [Read more...]

What’s your excuse, baby?

Bystanding

Briallen Hopper addresses this same fearful, noncommittal standing in the middle in a terrific essay at Killing the Buddha called “White People Problems.” Hopper’s first hook involves the recent Facebook-beloved advice column from Andrew W.K., which epitomizes the way that irresponsible timidity gets repackaged as a lofty, above-the-fray, “Third Way.” [Read more...]

Smart people saying smart things (9.16)

Armstrong

Jane Van Galen reads the style pages; Karen Armstrong on good theology; Drew G.I. Hart looks “Beyond the white privilege model;” Emily Bazelon won’t call the police; and W.E.B. Du Bois is still right. [Read more...]

Evangelicals becoming better neighbors (ratchet, ratchet …)

Jiminy

Culture-war Christians are convinced that staying true to their beliefs requires them to “be a jerk about it,” lest they begin to waver in their commitment. And they are convinced that staying true to their beliefs requires them “to make our secular government impose” those beliefs on everyone else. As long as they are convinced of those two things, they can never be good neighbors. [Read more...]

Ratcheting justice

Ratchet_example

It’s certainly possible to make the journey toward justice in the other direction, but it seems rare. There seems to be a kind of ratchet effect. That’s how the Apostle Paul described it, too. “It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks,” Paul says Jesus told him on the road to Damascus. Conversion isn’t geared for injustice. [Read more...]

Labor Day Scenes from the Class War

LaborDay

“It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.” [Read more...]


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