Peak Oil and the Local Church

gasprices

At last weekend's Inhabit Conference in Seattle, I had the opportunity to co-facilitate (with Brandon Rhodes) a conversation on "peak oil and place." It was a lively and fascinating discussion. Near the end I asked a question that I also want to pose here.Cheap fossil fuel energy has underwritten modernity and more than a century of America's rapid economic growth. But the world's oil resources are going into irreversible decline, and gas prices are through the roof. For this reason and others (climate change, high food prices, high debt levels), we seem to have reached "the end of … [Read more...]

Beds and Books: The Hospitality of Shakespeare and Company

Shakespeare and Company

Everything that rises must converge. Well, here is a fun convergence of interests.I am writing a chapter on hospitality for the Slow Church book. I have reference volumes stacked ten-high on my desk at home. But in the car to and from work I have been listening to audiobooks by Ernest Hemingway. The first audiobook I listened to is my favorite Hemingway book: A Moveable Feast, which is about Hemingway's time as a young writer in 1920s Paris. In fact, the Hemingway kick was inspired by Woody Allen's film Midnight in Paris - also partially set in the 1920s - a movie I compulsively rent and wa … [Read more...]

Eternal Beings Living in Time: On Wendell Berry’s “Jayber Crow”

wendell-berry

I have an unusually long commute these days, a burden I am taking steps to alleviate. The commute is redeemed somewhat by the opportunity to listen to audiobooks. If someone sets out to be a writer, the first piece of advice they get to is to keep writing. The second is to keep reading. I would append the second bit of advice to say "Keep reading. When possible, read out loud or be read to." There is something special about the way hearing a book, story, or poem read aloud can tune a writer's ear to the music of language and good storytelling.For the most part, I've been using the commute … [Read more...]

Inhabit Conference

parish_logo_slide-1

One of the key convictions of Slow Church is that God's plan for reconciling all creation involves not only gathering a people, but gathering people in particular places that span the globe. The language of Englewood Christian Church's covenant (where Chris is a member) puts it this way: the church community is "a manifestation of the Body of Christ in a particular place."Happily, there is a vibrant conversation happening in the church now about the importance of placedness. Christianity Today's This Is Our City project is one example. So is Jonathan Wilson-Hargrove's essential book, The Wi … [Read more...]

What I’m Reading Now: Bonhoeffer, by Eric Metaxas

Obama and Bonhoeffer Book

I have read five books so far in 2012. Two were by Martin Luther King - A Call to Conscience, a collection of speeches, and A Knock at Midnight, a collection of sermons - and a third book was Manning Marable's recent biography Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention. (I wrote a bit about the Marable book here and here.) I am now approximately four-fifths of the way through Eric Metaxas's biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy. Not long after starting the Bonhoeffer biography, I realized that Bonhoeffer, Malcolm X, and Dr. King all have something in common: they … [Read more...]

Serving the Common Good: An Interview with Miroslav Volf

Miroslav Volf

Chris and I recently collaborated on an article about the political role of the local church for the upcoming February/March issue of Neue Magazine. In preparation for writing the article, I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Miroslav Volf about politics, the local church, promoting human flourishing, and his most recent book, A Public Faith: How Followers of Christ Should Serve the Common Good. Dr. Volf is the Henry B. Wright Professor of Systematic Theology at Yale Divinity School and the Founding Director of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture. He is the author of numerous books, … [Read more...]

A Tale of Two Manifestos

Le Figaro Futurist Manifesto

In February 1909, the Italian poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti published his Futurist Manifesto in the French newspaper Le Figaro. The manifesto exalted the future over the past, violence and aggression over peace and ecstasy, immorality over morality, men over women, the young over the old, the machine over the land, and the known over the unknown. Marinetti also declared that “the splendor of the world has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed”: … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X