LAST DAY to help Englewood win $25K to complete our gardens!

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 (John and I were both at the Inhabit conference over the weekend; it was wonderful as always and we will get some reflections on that posted later this week.)TODAY is the last day to vote for the Englewood Neighborhood on the Near Eastside of Indianapolis (where I live, work and worship), in its quest for a $25,000 grant Neighborhood Assist Grant from State Farm. Can you do two quick things that will be a huge help us? 1) Make sure that you vote 10 times for us today.  (People are allowed to vote daily, so even if you've voted previously, we'd love to get your vote today.  The c … [Read more...]

Help The Englewood Neighborhood win $25,000 to finish our Outdoor Nature Playspace!

garden

Starting today, the Englewood Neighborhood on the Near Eastside of Indianapolis (where I live, work and worship), is in the running for a $25,000 grant Neighborhood Assist Grant from State Farm. If we would win, the money would be used to turn our community garden and the adjacent lot into a playspace and Nature education outdoor classroom We have worked with Keep Indianapolis Beautiful to develop a plan for the space, which if you are interested, you can view here... The plans include lots of trees for climbing, fruit trees, a tree house, water play area, a picnic shelter and … [Read more...]

Life On the Threshold: Reading the father of the rural life movement in the heart of the modern city

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  I have been talking about the work of Liberty Hyde Bailey a lot recently....  (See this previous post for instance)  So, I decided to republish this short essay on Bailey here.  Of all the things I've written over the years, this is one of my favorite pieces. This essay originally appeared in Catapult Magazine, March 2009.  Life on the threshold Reading the father of the rural life movement in the heart of the modern city   About a year ago, my friend Ragan Sutterfield recommended that I read Liberty Hyde Bailey’s The Holy Earth.  At some earlier point in my … [Read more...]

What is Missional Reading?

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I was sitting down this morning to write the next post in the "Slow Church and the Urgency of Justice" series, when I got distracted by an excellent post by Jon Boyd on the Intervarsity Press blog... [Question] Junot Díaz on Creating a Reading Public Boyd shares some excellent thoughts from novelist Junot Díaz, and then poses these questions: What are we doing these days, and what more could we be doing, to encourage readers in this day and age? Where have you seen bright spots, fertile nurseries of readers-in-the-making? What ideas do you have to multiply such incubators and make them e … [Read more...]

Mr. Rogers and the Garden of Your Mind

Longtime readers of this blog may recall the fondness and respect Chris and I have for Fred Rogers, the Presbyterian minister and educator from Pittsburgh who invited us all to be part of his TV neighborhood. In a recent Q essay on the "Ten Most Significant Cultural Trends of the Last Decade," Andy Crouch listed Place at #2, writing, "This quest for local, embodied, physical presence may well be driven by the omnipresence of the virtual and a dawning awareness of the thinness of disembodied life." It is fun to speculate - and speculation is all it can ever be - that Mister Rogers' … [Read more...]

Alan Roxburgh – Call to the Parish [Video]

Here's a video clip of Alan Roxburgh talking about "The Call to the Parish" at The Inhabit Conference last month...John and I both have been challenged by Roxburgh's work, and especially his recent book, Missional: Joining God in the Neighborhood (Baker, 2011 -- Read my review of this book on The Englewood Review of Books website). … [Read more...]

Broke into the Old Apartment (This is Where We Used to Live).

I rarely listen to music on the radio, but the other day I was flipping through the stations as I was driving and heard the opening riffs of the Barenaked Ladies' song "The Old Apartment." This song was a favorite of mine around about the time I graduated from college, so I turned it way up and reveled in the nostalgia. But in the midst of my revelry, the words caught my ear, and I realized that there was something profound here that I had never heard before: the song brings to the surface the deep grief we bear as a result of our hypermobility. … [Read more...]


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