Sunday Book Review: The King Jesus Gospel

A key part of Slow Church is the recovery of what has been lost in the Christian faith through the reductions and shortcuts of modernity.  Scot McKnight does just this in his newest book with regard to the Gospel and evangelism.This review originally appeared in The Englewood Review of Books… “Recovering What Has Been Lost in the Industrialization of Christianity” A review of The King Jesus Gospel: The Original Good News Revisited by Scot McKnight. Review by Chris Smith. The King Jesus Gospel: The Original Good News Revisited Scot McKnight. Hardback: Zondervan, 2011. … [Read more...]

Daily Slow Church Advent Reflections.

The_Nativity

Starting on Monday (Nov. 28), Chris Smith will be coordinating a daily series of reflections here on the daily lectionary texts throughout the season of Advent.Advent is too often a season when the pace of life speeds up instead of slowing down.  Through these Advent reflections, we hope to challenge ourselves to slow down, be attentive and remember all the gifts of life that surround us daily.To be sure you don’t miss these reflections, connect with  the Slow Church blog on Facebook, Twitter or by entering your email address over on the righthand sidebar. … [Read more...]

Slow Church: The Book

Well, it is official and officially public: Chris and I just signed a contract with InterVarsity Press to write the book, Slow Church. The plan right now is to write the book over the next eight months, with a release date of mid-2013.Chris and I both have such high regard for IVP - especially its Likewise imprint, which has published some of our favorite books of the last few years, including books by Shane Claiborne and Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, Jamie Arpin-Ricci, Andrew Marin, Sean Gladding, Tom Sine, Scott Bessenecker, and Mark Scandrette, among others - that we never "shopped" our … [Read more...]

Getting to the heart of Slow Church

Food and Faith - Norman Wirzba

If there is one short work that gets to the heart of what Slow Church is about, it is the chapter "Eucharistic Table Manners" from Norman Wirzba's new book Food and Faith: A Theology of Eating.It is from Wirzba, and from John Howard Yoder before him, that we borrow the central image of the Slow Church as that of a shared meal: The ritualized character of the Eucharist sometimes causes people to forget that the supper was a meal.  It was not a nibbling session, but the place where the disciples came together to obtain their inspiration, strength and sustenance.  The evidence of the early c … [Read more...]

VIDEO: Becoming the Liturgy – Ian Morgan Cron on the Slow Work of God.

This is a lovely clip from The Work of the People of Ian Morgan Cron talking about the Slow work of God... (HT: Scott Emery)  CLICK HERE for another related and excellent clip from Cron, on the bread and the wine... … [Read more...]

Scot McKnight on the centrality of the local church.

Scot McKnight

Our fellow Patheos blogger has been stirring up some intense conversation with his recent post "Kingdom Work, Social Justice" (Be sure to read the comments).  Here's the heart of the post: I’m all for “social” justice. I’m fighting the trend I see today of equating “kingdom work” with public sector social justice work. As if “kingdom” is something done outside the church. As I read the Gospels, Jesus’ uses “kingdom” for himself/God as King, for his followers who enter into his kingdom vision, and for the ecclesial/social conditions created by those who follow Jesus and his kingdom vision. … [Read more...]

“God Does Not Hurry”

"All revolutionaries have one basic problem: they are all short of time" - Gerhard Lohfink, Does God Need the Church? One of the most basic theological convictions in our understanding of Slow Church is the slowness of God.  Kelly Johnson does a wonderful job of explaining this slowness in her essay "God Does Not Hurry" from the recent book God Does Not...: Entertain, Play "Matchmaker," Hurry, Demand Blood, Cure Every Illness (Baker Books, 2009, Brent Laytham, Editor).Read a good chunk of this essay, courtesy of Google Books: … [Read more...]


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