Congregational Lectio Divina as a Slow Church practice.

Conversation

At the Ekklesia Project gathering later this week, I will be leading lectio divina sessions on John 15:4-17.Doing lectio in a congregational (or small group) setting is a fruitful practice that will lead churches deeper into the life that John and I are calling Slow Church.Mark Lau Branson, who led the lectio divina sessions at last summer's EP Gathering, pointed us to the following thoughts on congregational lectio divina: Argentinean/Chicagoan Nancy Bedford, after expositing an ecclesial missiology grounded in the Trinity and the incarnation, focuses on discernment with attention to … [Read more...]

The Anguish of Imperfect Communion [An Ekklesia Project Guest Post by Juila Smucker]

Eucharist

[ NEXT WEEK, July 5-7, The Ekklesia Project will hold its annual gathering in Chicago, which will be on the theme of Slow Church.  Between now and July, we will be running a series of guest reflections here by folks connected with the E.P. We've asked guest posters to reflect on the meaning of Slow Church from their own local contexts. More info on the E.P. gathering.  ] Today’s reflection, the seventh in the series, is by Julia Smucker.Read the previous post in the series by John Jay Alvaro.For about the past five years, I have been a par … [Read more...]

Conversation, Identity and Christian Unity.

BTA-Convo

I have been keenly following Timothy Dalrymple's posts this week about partisan scorn and his critical response to Rachel Held Evans' well-traveled post “How to Win a Culture War and Lose a Generation”...  Although I'm a bit skeptical of Dalrymple's choice of Evans as an example of  "selling scorn," I'm not really going to comment on their back and forth, as I don't have a stake in either side of that conversation.What was of interest to me, in light of my concern for our churches as hubs of conversation were these excellent three points that Dalrymple offered at the end of his most recent … [Read more...]

A Friend of Time [An Ekklesia Project Guest Post by John Jay Alvaro]

wb-102

[ On July 5-7, The Ekklesia Project will hold its annual gathering in Chicago, which will be on the theme of Slow Church.  Between now and July, we will be running a series of guest reflections here by folks connected with the E.P. We've asked guest posters to reflect on the meaning of Slow Church from their own local contexts. More info on the E.P. gathering.  ] Today’s reflection, the seventh in the series, is by John Jay Alvaro.Read the previous post in the series by Janice Love. It is the second largest Sunday school class in the church. I … [Read more...]

Bonhoeffer on The Fellowship of the Table

Dietrich_Bonhoeffer

On Sunday, I was not attentive to my schedule and had it sprung on me that it was my turn to give the communion meditation at our church. So, I quickly turned to Dietrich Bonhoeffer's Life Together, which we are reading in our Sunday School class, and stumbled again upon the following brilliant passage.  I share it again here, because all the facets that Bonhoeffer locates in the Eucharist here are central to what John and I are calling Slow Church: gratitude, the centrality of Jesus (I'll have more to say on this point later this week), the unifying power of eating together, the joy and … [Read more...]

The Official Sport of the Slow Church Movement

Dugout

I think baseball should be the official sport of the Slow Church movement.I love baseball. When I can, I listen to or watch games at home. I read books about baseball. (I'm currently reading Bruce Weber's magnificent As They See 'Em: Travels in the Land of Umpires.) I play catch or wiffle ball at home with my daughter. And I like to take in games at the high school, the local short-season single-A team, and even the very occasional big league game. The two things I have most on mind these days are Slow Church and baseball. Here is my first, albeit ham-fisted (and self-indulgent!), attempt t … [Read more...]

Broke into the Old Apartment (This is Where We Used to Live).

I rarely listen to music on the radio, but the other day I was flipping through the stations as I was driving and heard the opening riffs of the Barenaked Ladies' song "The Old Apartment." This song was a favorite of mine around about the time I graduated from college, so I turned it way up and reveled in the nostalgia. But in the midst of my revelry, the words caught my ear, and I realized that there was something profound here that I had never heard before: the song brings to the surface the deep grief we bear as a result of our hypermobility. … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X