Cultivating Wonder.

Bailey-WNW

This is the first in my promised series of reflections on Liberty Hyde Bailey's poetry.[ Bailey's collection of poems Wind and Weather, has just been released by The Englewood Review of Books as a bargain-priced Kindle ebook.  It's well worth it! ]MiracleYesterday the twig was brown and bare; To-day the glint of green is there To-morrow will be leaflets spare; I know no thing so wondrous fair No miracle so strangely rare.I wonder what will next be there.One of the great losses in the post-industrial age, is the disappearance of wonder.  Our pace of life moves so f … [Read more...]

The Fall and Food Preservation [Guest Post -Thomas Turner]

Home_Canning

Thom Turner is a friend and regular contributor to The Englewood Review of Books. Thom is also an adjunct lecturer of English at Nyack College and the Senior Editor and Publisher of GENERATE Magazine. He has recently been doing a wonderful series on his blog on a Christian ethic of eating, which has some important connections to our Slow Church project. I invited him to guest post here, and he offered the following reflection.Last night as I was ladling the oozing remnants of twenty five pounds of apples into just sterilized quart jars I got to thinking: why do I have to do … [Read more...]

Beds and Books: The Hospitality of Shakespeare and Company

Shakespeare and Company

Everything that rises must converge. Well, here is a fun convergence of interests.I am writing a chapter on hospitality for the Slow Church book. I have reference volumes stacked ten-high on my desk at home. But in the car to and from work I have been listening to audiobooks by Ernest Hemingway. The first audiobook I listened to is my favorite Hemingway book: A Moveable Feast, which is about Hemingway's time as a young writer in 1920s Paris. In fact, the Hemingway kick was inspired by Woody Allen's film Midnight in Paris - also partially set in the 1920s - a movie I compulsively rent and wa … [Read more...]

Eternal Beings Living in Time: On Wendell Berry’s “Jayber Crow”

wendell-berry

I have an unusually long commute these days, a burden I am taking steps to alleviate. The commute is redeemed somewhat by the opportunity to listen to audiobooks. If someone sets out to be a writer, the first piece of advice they get to is to keep writing. The second is to keep reading. I would append the second bit of advice to say "Keep reading. When possible, read out loud or be read to." There is something special about the way hearing a book, story, or poem read aloud can tune a writer's ear to the music of language and good storytelling.For the most part, I've been using the commute … [Read more...]

Robert Putnam – “Spend More Time Arranging the Church Suppers”

320px-Nicolas_Tournier_001

Thanks to my friend Kevin Rains for calling this article to my attention... [ See also the Catholic News Service piece on this study, which spells out its results in greater detail... ] WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Harvard public policy professor Robert D. Putnam has a tongue-in-cheek suggestion for pastors: "Spend less time on the sermons, and more time arranging the church suppers." That's because research by Putnam and Chaeyoon Lim, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, shows that the more church friends a person has, the happier he or she is. [ Read the … [Read more...]

Bringing Slow Church to a Fast Generation [Ekklesia Project Guest Post by Jarrod Longbons]

Fast

[ On July 5-7, The Ekklesia Project will hold its annual gathering in Chicago, which will be on the theme of Slow Church.  Between now and July, we will be running a series of lguest reflections here by folks connected with the E.P. We've asked guest posters to reflect on the meaning of Slow Church from their own local contexts. More info on the E.P. gathering.  ] Today’s reflection, the second in the series, is by Jarrod Longbons. Read the first post by Lee Wyatt.I am part of a thriving, yet “slow church” community.  It’s called YAC (Young Adult Community), a ministry of Northside Ch … [Read more...]

Setting the Table [Guest post by Jen Michel]

Table

Jen Michel is a new friend from Toronto that I met on my writing retreat in February.  She recently posted this piece on her blog, Finding My Pulse, and her reflections on the table were in line with our Slow Church image of "Dinner Table Conversation as a Way of Being Church," so I asked if she would mind my re-posting it here.Years ago, I read a great book by Danny Meyer called: Setting the Table: The Transforming Power of Hospitality in Business. At 27, Meyer opened what would become one of Manhattan’s best restaurants: Union Square Café. Since that time, he has experimented and inn … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X