Christian Witness: Reconciling contemplation and action.

AM-AV

There's a group of us at Englewood that have been working our way through Alasdair MacIntrye's important book After Virtue.  Although I first read the book over a decade ago, it has been good to have the opportunity to return to it again, and to realize the ways that Slow Church was profoundly shaped by it.For instance we recently read this passage from the end of Chapter 5: Abstract changes in moral concepts are always embodied in real, particular events.  ... There ought not to be two histories, one of political and moral action and one of political and moral theorizing, because there w … [Read more...]

In Sickness and in Health – Guest Post by Justin McRoberts

McBob

One of the wonderful things that happened at The Festival of Faith and Writing last month was that I had the opportunity to meet singer/songwriter Justin McRoberts.  We had some good conversations, and he was very interested in Slow Church. Justin recently wrote a wonderful book entitled CMYK: The Process of Life Together -- which I read in one sitting this past weekend! -- and which I hope to review very soon for The Englewood Review of Books. He recently sent me an excerpt from this book that is very pertinent to Slow Church, and I am delighted to share it with you here.Be sure to check … [Read more...]

The Big Table – Living in the Diversity of God’s People

BigTable

One of the things that pains me most is the acerbity with which Christians of diverse perspectives treat one another: the mocking, the name-calling, the refusal to talk civilly or to work together.  Since early on in the development of this Slow Church project, I have had an intuition that the act of slowing down and being attentive to those around us might be important baby steps in the direction of narrowing the deep chasms that divide the Body of Christ today.  One of the most exciting things about the recent Slow Church conference was the vast theological diversity of the participants: f … [Read more...]

“A Great Day For the Children of Indiana”

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We were honored to host a momentous occasion here at Englewood Christian Church today. Because of Daystar Childcare, our widely-recognized daycare, we were selected as the site where Gov. Mike Pence would sign into law, a new bill that provides state funding for Pre-Kindergarten.  As noted by Nicole Baker-Fulgham in her talk at the 2014 Justice Conference last month, Indiana was one of the last remaining states that did not provide any state funding for Pre-K. We were delighted to be the place where the journey began toward better care for the children of Indiana, and especially children of … [Read more...]

Why I Don’t Go To Church

church

There has been a lot of buzz online in recent days about the value of church attendance.  Initiated by a pair of posts by Donald Miller, ( The initial post... and the followup.), who bravely confessed that he rarely goes to church, Miller's posts were followed up by this piece on Christianity Today's PARSE blog, which dug a little deeper but had more of the feel of an expose, and didn't get to the heart of what seems (to me anyway) to be the crucial issues about church.I appreciate Donald's honesty -- and Brian McLaren's as well, in response to the PARSE piece -- and I have no interest … [Read more...]

From Frankenstein’s Monster to The Body of Christ

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 I have had several conversations over the last week that reminded me how little regard we have for the church as the body of Christ.In reflecting on those conversations, I began to wonder if Dr. Frankenstein's monster might be a fitting image for how we typically think of the body of Christ: a collection of parts, thrown together (and easily interchangeable) and animated by some external, mystical force like a lightning bolt.Having been deeply formed by the individualism of Western Culture, we are trained to narrate our lives primarily as individuals and to think of … [Read more...]

Slow and Local are Where We Must Begin.

Englewood-Garden

A Response to Jamie Smith...  I have a deep appreciation for Jamie Smith’s work.  His latest book, Imagining The Kingdom, will most likely be one of The Englewood Review of Books’ (of which I am the editor) best books of the year for 2013, and his Desiring the Kingdom was one named one of our best books of 2009.  And yet I can’t help feeling like the brilliant young philosophy professor has created a straw man in his latest blog post for Cardus: Knitting While Detroit Burns. This post is a response to Brandon Rhodes’s recent profile of Tacoma, WA’s Zoe Liveable Church on … [Read more...]


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