The Groaning Table

The Groaning Table

After recently re-reading Wendell Berry’s essay “Health is Membership” and being struck by its pertinency today, I asked a few friends to read the essay and write a Slow Church-related reflection on the essay.  The is the second of these reflections by my friend Rachel Marie Stone.     ~Chris*** Read the first "Health is Membership" reflection by Brent BillMy grandmother was born at home in New York City in 1925 – exactly the time when more and more women, especially city women, began to choose hospital over home as the place to have babies. It wasn’t that my great-grandmother was afrai … [Read more...]

Being Together as the Church.

dish-washing

There is a group of us here at Englewood Christian Church who have been reading and reflecting on the Sermon on the Mount together over the summer.  Last night, we had the opportunity as part of our Sunday Night Conversation (You can read more about that here...) to share our reflections with the church community.   Our conversation -- both in the smaller group over the summer and with the larger church last night focused on the Beatitudes at the beginning of the Sermon (Matt. 5: 1-11).  I wanted to share a few thoughts here that I brought up in our conversation last night, as they are related … [Read more...]

Supporting Each Other in Sickness and in Health

hospital

After recently re-reading Wendell Berry's essay "Health is Membership" and being struck by its pertinency today, I asked a few friends to read the essay and write a Slow Church-related reflection on the essay.  The is the first of these reflections by my friend Brent Bill.     ~ChrisAlmost twenty years ago Wendell Berry gave an address titled “Health is Membership.”  Berry, the agrarian poet/novelist/theologian, presented a pretty scathing indictment of the then “modern” health system in the US and our complicity in its failings.  Among his criticisms, which are many, was that our under … [Read more...]

The Roadblocks to Sustainability and How we Begin to Tackle Them

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David Owen has long been one of our favorite thinkers here at Englewood; his book Green Metropolis was selected by The Englewood Review of Books as one of the Best Books of 2009.  [ Read our review // Watch a video of a lecture related to the book ]I was recently alerted to the fact that he published a new book earlier this year (that somehow slipped under our radar), entitled: The Conundrum: How Scientific Innovation, Increased Efficiency, and Good Intentions Can Make Our Energy and Climate Problems Worse Paperback: Riverhead Books, 2012. Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]I was blown … [Read more...]

What is Sustainability?

Seedling

Tomorrow I have the opportunity to go an hour or so up the road from here to talk with some students at my alma mater, Taylor University.The primary question that we will tackle will be what is sustainability?  And how do we pursue it?I'm sure we'll have some good conversation along the way.  I will argue that our best hope of a sustainable way of life is in the revival of parish life, (a term I'm borrowing from the good folks at the Parish Collective), by which I mean a rich and distinctive local culture that is catalyzed (but not controlled) by the churches in a particular place. … [Read more...]

Congregational Lectio Divina as a Slow Church practice.

Conversation

At the Ekklesia Project gathering later this week, I will be leading lectio divina sessions on John 15:4-17.Doing lectio in a congregational (or small group) setting is a fruitful practice that will lead churches deeper into the life that John and I are calling Slow Church.Mark Lau Branson, who led the lectio divina sessions at last summer's EP Gathering, pointed us to the following thoughts on congregational lectio divina: Argentinean/Chicagoan Nancy Bedford, after expositing an ecclesial missiology grounded in the Trinity and the incarnation, focuses on discernment with attention to … [Read more...]

Technology, Community and Discernment.

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John's post on Saturday on the Moral Importance of the iPhone reminded me of one of my favorite courses in college, an honors seminar on technology and community.  This class was my first deep immersion into the works of Wendell Berry, and it was also where I first encountered the work of the Amish writer David Kline. A major thrust of the course was reflecting on the ways in which our choices about technology impact the shape of our communities (as families, as churches and as neighborhoods.  One of the pieces we read for the class was Wendell Berry's little essay "Why I am NOT going to buy a … [Read more...]


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