The Big Table – Living in the Diversity of God’s People

BigTable

One of the things that pains me most is the acerbity with which Christians of diverse perspectives treat one another: the mocking, the name-calling, the refusal to talk civilly or to work together.  Since early on in the development of this Slow Church project, I have had an intuition that the act of slowing down and being attentive to those around us might be important baby steps in the direction of narrowing the deep chasms that divide the Body of Christ today.  One of the most exciting things about the recent Slow Church conference was the vast theological diversity of the participants: f … [Read more...]

The Hope-full Politics of the Table

EDC-Square

 The following is a reflection that I will share tomorrow night as part of the Election Day Communion service here at Englewood Christian Church.Why celebrate communion on election day?To do so is not merely a religious act, we have intentionally chosen to break bread together -- not to have a worship or prayer service (good as those things are).  Tonight on the eve of this election day, we are celebrating our unity in seeking the Kingdom of God together.  But for many people, I imagine, the Kingdom of God is an abstract and nebulous thing.  Perhaps we should think of the Ki … [Read more...]

The Groaning Table

The Groaning Table

After recently re-reading Wendell Berry’s essay “Health is Membership” and being struck by its pertinency today, I asked a few friends to read the essay and write a Slow Church-related reflection on the essay.  The is the second of these reflections by my friend Rachel Marie Stone.     ~Chris*** Read the first "Health is Membership" reflection by Brent BillMy grandmother was born at home in New York City in 1925 – exactly the time when more and more women, especially city women, began to choose hospital over home as the place to have babies. It wasn’t that my great-grandmother was afrai … [Read more...]

Slowly Seeking the Shalom of God.

PRGrocer

Yesterday, John raised the question: what are the standards by which we make decisions and judge the health of a church community in a peak oil world?This question has been a pressing one for us at Englewood Christian Church, one that has regularly been the focus of our Sunday night conversation (the story of which I told in the recent ebook The Virtue of Dialogue).  As I suggested in the comments to John's post, our experience has been that the standard should be the health and flourishing of our places, our church communities should bear witness to the neighbors in our particular place … [Read more...]

The Fall and Food Preservation [Guest Post -Thomas Turner]

Home_Canning

Thom Turner is a friend and regular contributor to The Englewood Review of Books. Thom is also an adjunct lecturer of English at Nyack College and the Senior Editor and Publisher of GENERATE Magazine. He has recently been doing a wonderful series on his blog on a Christian ethic of eating, which has some important connections to our Slow Church project. I invited him to guest post here, and he offered the following reflection.Last night as I was ladling the oozing remnants of twenty five pounds of apples into just sterilized quart jars I got to thinking: why do I have to do … [Read more...]

Setting the Table [Guest post by Jen Michel]

Table

Jen Michel is a new friend from Toronto that I met on my writing retreat in February.  She recently posted this piece on her blog, Finding My Pulse, and her reflections on the table were in line with our Slow Church image of "Dinner Table Conversation as a Way of Being Church," so I asked if she would mind my re-posting it here.Years ago, I read a great book by Danny Meyer called: Setting the Table: The Transforming Power of Hospitality in Business. At 27, Meyer opened what would become one of Manhattan’s best restaurants: Union Square Café. Since that time, he has experimented and inn … [Read more...]

Hungering and Thirsting After Righteousness [Guest Post -Thomas Turner]

Via Wikimedia Commons

Thom Turner is a friend and regular contributor to The Englewood Review of Books. Thom is also an adjunct lecturer of English at Nyack College and the Senior Editor and Publisher of GENERATE Magazine. He has recently been doing a wonderful series on his blog on a Christian ethic of eating, which has some important connections to our Slow Church project. I invited him to guest post here, and he offered this great reflection for the present season of Lent.When Christ tells us to “hunger and thirst after righteousness” or to pray that God “give us our daily bread” our full, first world be … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X