Remembering Mr. Rogers.

FRED-poster

  Today marks the 11th anniversary of the death of Fred Rogers (aka, PBS's Mr. Rogers).   John and I have made no secret of the fact that we are big fans of Mr. Rogers, and even refer to him in the Slow Church book -- in reference to his ideas about the formative power of dinner table conversation.We love that his work is situated in a neighborhood, that it is fundamentally about friendship, being attentive always and welcoming everyone as a gift.  Our churches would do well to learn from his example. In memory of Fred Rogers today, I thought it would be appropriate to share a few … [Read more...]

Mr. Rogers and the Garden of Your Mind

Longtime readers of this blog may recall the fondness and respect Chris and I have for Fred Rogers, the Presbyterian minister and educator from Pittsburgh who invited us all to be part of his TV neighborhood. In a recent Q essay on the "Ten Most Significant Cultural Trends of the Last Decade," Andy Crouch listed Place at #2, writing, "This quest for local, embodied, physical presence may well be driven by the omnipresence of the virtual and a dawning awareness of the thinness of disembodied life." It is fun to speculate - and speculation is all it can ever be - that Mister Rogers' … [Read more...]

Mr. Rogers and the Formative Power of Dinner Table Conversation.

In one of his last books, Fred Rogers – a Presbyterian minister otherwise known as PBS’s Mr. Rogers – made the poignant observation that:“At the dinner table children learn the art of making conversation – how to take turns listening and talking and how to put their ideas into words.  Even their vocabulary increases as they learn new words and new ideas from others in the family.” [ Read this quote in its context on Google Books ][ from The Mr. Rogers Parenting Book, 19 ]As Mr. Rogers alludes here, dinner table conversation is a formative practice, … [Read more...]


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