Becoming the Exploited Ones?

The-Art-of-the-Commonplace

I re-encountered these passages from Wendell Berry's book THE ART OF THE COMMONPLACE this weekend. (Caveat: Berry uses the terms "redskin" and the n-word, in ways that explore the demeaning tone that these words carried -- and still carry.  Berry's economic point is clear, but I am conflicted about his use of these loaded terms) Read from "But we know..." on page 36 to "the industrial systems of Europe" page 37: Start after the asterisks on page 42 through the end of the chapter:   Berry's point is clear -- and one that John and I make in the SLOW CHURCH book -- … [Read more...]

Boomers, Stickers, and the Lifecycle of a Community

Silverton Top Ten

A few days ago, I read an interesting article over at The Atlantic Cities called the "The Lifecycle of a 'Cool' Neighborhood." The sociologist and historian Richard Greenwald writes in the article that "Declaring the death of hip neighborhoods seems to be an endless right of passage in Gotham." It comes with the territory of knowing and labeling - articulating really - what matters in a rootless city. Neighborhoods come and go - and I mean that in the Brooksian Bo-Bo way. During the 20th century it was Greenwich Village, Harlem, SoHo, Tribeca, the Lower East Side, and then Brooklyn. At … [Read more...]

Broke into the Old Apartment (This is Where We Used to Live).

I rarely listen to music on the radio, but the other day I was flipping through the stations as I was driving and heard the opening riffs of the Barenaked Ladies' song "The Old Apartment." This song was a favorite of mine around about the time I graduated from college, so I turned it way up and reveled in the nostalgia. But in the midst of my revelry, the words caught my ear, and I realized that there was something profound here that I had never heard before: the song brings to the surface the deep grief we bear as a result of our hypermobility. … [Read more...]

We Have Nowhere Else to Go, and Nothing Else to Do.

miracle_worker_copy

Yesterday, we took our homeschool co-op to the Indiana Repertory Theatre to see William Gibson's The Miracle Worker, the renowned story of Helen Keller's childhood.  This field trip was a special event since Rachel, one of our homeschoolers, had a small role in the play. It was an amazing performance, and especially 12-year old Ciarra Krohne who played the role of Helen (pictured). But this is not a review of the play; there was one line that stuck in my head and that seemed particularly relevant to the recent posts here about the faithfulness of the local church in a peak oil world.  … [Read more...]