Setting the Table [Guest post by Jen Michel]

Table

Jen Michel is a new friend from Toronto that I met on my writing retreat in February.  She recently posted this piece on her blog, Finding My Pulse, and her reflections on the table were in line with our Slow Church image of "Dinner Table Conversation as a Way of Being Church," so I asked if she would mind my re-posting it here. Years ago, I read a great book by Danny Meyer called: Setting the Table: The Transforming Power of Hospitality in Business. At 27, Meyer opened what would become one of Manhattan’s best restaurants: Union Square Café. Since that time, he has experimented and … [Read more...]

Becoming Conversational #9 – Regularly Share a Meal Together.

The Virtue of Dialogue - C. Christopher Smith

My ebook The Virtue of Dialogue: Conversation as a Hopeful Practice of Church Communities was recently released by Patheos Press, and in it, I argue that open conversation is essential for the health and flourishing of church communities and the places they inhabit. Over the past week and the current week, I will be running a 10-part series that I am calling "Becoming Conversational" in which I offer suggestions for how churches might enrich the conversational life of their church communities. (Some of these ideas have been adapted from my earlier ebook, Growing Deeper in Our Church … [Read more...]

Getting to the heart of Slow Church

Food and Faith - Norman Wirzba

If there is one short work that gets to the heart of what Slow Church is about, it is the chapter "Eucharistic Table Manners" from Norman Wirzba's new book Food and Faith: A Theology of Eating. It is from Wirzba, and from John Howard Yoder before him, that we borrow the central image of the Slow Church as that of a shared meal: The ritualized character of the Eucharist sometimes causes people to forget that the supper was a meal.  It was not a nibbling session, but the place where the disciples came together to obtain their inspiration, strength and sustenance.  The evidence of the early … [Read more...]

Mr. Rogers and the Formative Power of Dinner Table Conversation.

In one of his last books, Fred Rogers – a Presbyterian minister otherwise known as PBS’s Mr. Rogers – made the poignant observation that: “At the dinner table children learn the art of making conversation – how to take turns listening and talking and how to put their ideas into words.  Even their vocabulary increases as they learn new words and new ideas from others in the family.” [ Read this quote in its context on Google Books ] [ from The Mr. Rogers Parenting Book, 19 ] As Mr. Rogers alludes here, dinner table conversation is a formative practice, … [Read more...]


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