If You’re a Convert join the club

There is a new Catholic Converts blog. Chris Landsell invites converts of all stripes who have a blog to drop him a line and add their blog to his list, and maybe link to their conversion story. He’d probably post your conversion story on his site if you send it to him, and he welcomes your comments.

Join the club. Your witness may help many others who are considering the Path to Rome.

  • Anonymous

    I love conversion stories and never miss The Journey Home. I have discovered, however, that it takes a long time to become Catholic from the inside out. A signature and a profession of faith are only the beginning of a very long journey, even when starting from High-Anglican Catholicism, as I did several years ago. Learning to think like a Catholic or to read Holy Scripture as a Catholic is a life-time process. For instance, I recently heard a recently ordained priest (formerly a Protestant minister) explain the Mass in terms of an admittedly Protestant theology and heard only about “the Lord’s Supper” and not the Holy Sacrifice. I wondered why, when asked to explain the Mass as a priest, he had to fall back on Protestant theology.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    I agree. A friend heard me speak and said, ‘You can take the boy out of the Baptist Church, but you can’t take the Baptist Church out of the boy.’This has good and bad effects. Sometimes the former Evangelical will not strest his Catholic distinctives enough, but other times they bring evangelical fervor and many other gifts to the Catholic Church

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15692229876291491107 Mark

    I still think there’s nothing wrong in being able to use our backgrounds in our faith. Whilst I now see myself as a Catholic and will be come Easter, I know I owe an immense gratitude to the Anglican Communion, and a small part of me will always be an Anglican (obedient to the Church’s magisterium nevertheless).What did you think on the post about timing, by the way? I was wondering if you thought it hit the mark or not?

  • Anonymous

    Just about every former Anglican I know, including myself (and I just spent three hours with one as we planned a Day of Recollection in our parish) comes in with the idea that, boy, do I have a lot to teach these Catholics and they have so much to learn about liturgy and prayer and coffee-hour fellowship after the 11 o’clock service. My friend confessed to the very same thought when she became a Catholic. She said, “I thought I knew so much more than they did, especially about how things should be done. It took me several years to discover that I had so much to learn from them.” Maybe it is true that Anglicans have much to offer, and maybe it’s the result of the Oxford Movement that, in restoring English Catholicism, gave such an intellectual bent to Anglicanism along with a striving for excellence in language, music, and ideas (how can you beat Newman et al. picking up the reins from Thomas More, Edmund Campion, et al.), along with (it must be admitted)a certain condescension toward the peasant class. Nobless oblige, and all that.So, by all means, bring your evangelical fervor and the appreciation of all that beautiful hymnody and enjoy feeling really, really smug singing “Faith of Our Fathers”, knowing that, at last, you are singing it in its proper setting and Fr. Faber is right there at your side. But before you lay out your treasures for admiration and emulation, take some time to be humble, to learn from Catholics who have lived and breathed Catholicism all of their lives– to one degree or another. Remember an old saying: Don’t try to teach the paths of the forest to an old gorilla. And another old saying of my husband’s: You never learn anything when you’re talking. Immerse yourself in the saints until you understand the spirituality of St. Therese and her embrace of suffering and are not squeamish about kissing the ankle bone of an old saint. Be a learner long before you try to be a teacher, and don’t pray for humility unless you really mean it. The answer to your prayer might just be a devastating blow to your ego.

  • Anonymous

    For Mark: We’ll be waiting to hear from you ten years from now to see whether “a small part of [you] will always be an Anglican.” We will be very surprised if it is so. Like every other Anglican convert I know, you will probably be so, so happy to have laid down that burden somewhere along the way, and you won’t even know when it happened. People don’t live on bridges, after all, and sooner or later we all discover that the bridge was such an empty place. Home is not a bridge. Home has more secure foundations. Congratulations for finding your way home. Welcome.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    When Bishop Graham Leonard was thinking about becoming a Catholic he had a conversation with Cardinal Hume, saying (in effect) that he wanted to bring in the riches of the Anglican Church and find a way to retain all that was good in the Anglican Church in the Catholic faith. Cardinal Hume listened for a time then asked quietly, “Just what exactly is it in the Anglican Church you wish to retain that is not already in the Catholic church?” Leonard could come up with practically nothing…good hymns? choral evensong? What else is there that is not already Catholic? I’m with the other commentators here. Once you are a Catholic the Anglican Church seems like fairyland (in more ways than one I’m afraid) Newman said this somewhere too, and I don’t know the quote well enough to spin it off, but it is all about “what he thought was so solid and substantial in Anglicansiim proved to be ephemeral.”

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15692229876291491107 Mark

    @Anonymous / Fr Dwight:You’re right. After a good sleep, I’m not sure I will have any ‘Anglicanism’ left. After all, the only thing upsetting me these days is that my Parish doesn’t do gregorian chant! ;-)


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