Catherine of Siena Institute

The folks over at the Catherine of Siena Institute are the people behind the brilliant ‘Called and Gifted’ workshops. They have posts about the kerfuffle on this blog about the term ‘Evangelical Catholicism’. If you would like to get away from the snap judgements, bias and name calling and get some sober professional and learned insight on this debate check out Fr. Mike’s posts.

He also has lots of good things to say about their recent visit to Greenville. Check it out.

  • Anonymous

    Considering he misrepresents the points made by those who disagree with you, I don’t think his comments are very constructive. (Note: I said this with a big smile on my face, while whistling a happy tune…I’m not sour, angry, nor disaffected).

  • Anonymous

    Once again, Fr. Longenecker, you are characterizing people who disagree with you as name-callers, biased, etc. I think it’s a question, not of the outcome, but of the hermeneutic employed. No one denies that a personal relationship with Jesus Christ is the desideratum; it’s the way that this is engendered that is the question. And the Church has been very successful at it for centuries now. The people at Intentional Disciples have not yet answered my question as to how they do this that is different or more successful than what the Church has done in ages past (and without relativizing the Church in the process).Susan

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/08572976822786862149 Darwin

    Susan,I can’t tell what your issue is (other than a severe case of anglo-philia if you run around insisting that terms such as “missionize” are more Catholic than “evangelize”) but you seem to be basing much of this on the assumption that there is out there a wonderful and effective system which is busy catechizing all our Catholic beautifully and is endangered only by a bunch of evil crypto-protestants intent on gutting the whole program.Having grown up a “cradle Catholic” (though fortunately in a very orthodox and traditional family) in the post Vatican II US, I find this rather hard to fathom. Not only is almost every major program I’ve seen in action for catechizing the faithful fluff or junk (at best) but in all honesty, I have to think that there was something none-too-solid about what came before in the 30s, 40s and 50s — given that it produced the people who engendered all this chaos in the name of implementing the council.It seems to me that if the folks at the Sienna Institute and Evangelical Catholicism are providing any sort of faith formation at all which is grounded in the documents of the Church, in the sacraments, in liturgy and in scripture, most Catholics can’t help but be better off for it.

  • Anonymous

    Darwin,”Intentions” aren’t enough. It’s the results that count. An claiming to produce a product superior to what the 2,000 year history of the Church has produced without discernible, quantitative results just doesn’t count. And it’s a bit hubristic.Susan

  • Anonymous

    Susan,The drug store called. Your lithium is ready.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/08572976822786862149 Darwin

    Susan,Do we cradle Catholics really want to play the “it’s the results that count” game after what we’ve done to ourselves over the last fifty years?There is not some standard, out of the box way of catechizing which has been used by all Catholics for 2000 years. Numerous spiritualities and modes of instruction have come and gone. And all that are loyal to our Mother the Church have to some extent or another produced good fruits.I can’t see why the fact that some English speaking Protestants have made a mark over the last hundred years or so throwing around the word “evangelical” and the phrase “personal relationship with Christ” somehow put that word and concept off limits for loyal children of the Church.

  • Anonymous

    Darwin,Perhaps because the people urging us to use words like “evangelical” and “personal relationship with Christ” are converts from evangelical ecclesial communities who may have other agendas than Catholic ones.

  • Anonymous

    Drats! You’ve discovered the plot. Evangelicals are now working together with Masons, Marxists, and the Marx Brothers to bring the Catholic Church to its knees! And we would have gotten away with it except for Scooby and those darn kids!

  • Anonymous

    I’m not saying it’s a conspiracy, but I think there IS a crisis in Catholic identity and evangelical converts want a Catholic Church that is “responsive” to them, i.e., a low church liturgy, a low Christology, etc. That’s all I’m saying. And I think vigilant Catholics have a right to be concerned.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    Well here’s one convert from Evangelicalism that does not want low church liturgy and a low Christology…in fact I haven’t met any converts from Evangelicalism who want that. For goodness sake, if we wanted that we’d have stayed Evangelicals!

  • Anonymous

    As outstadning teachers of the Catholic Faith, I’ll take former Evangelicals like Hahn, Grodi, Longenecker, Newman, Howard, Kreeft, Keating etc any day of the week and twice on Sunday.I don’t know which former Evangelicals you’re talking about, but you need to get out more. Some of the most vibrant corners of the Church in the US are filled up with Catholics who were once Evangelical Protestants. It is precisely because they were looking for “More Christianity” (in Father Longenecker’s happy phrase) that they became Catholics, and they have enriched us all with their gifts. Scott Hahn’s work alone is worth two or three provinces of Jesuits filled up with cradle Catholics.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/08572976822786862149 Darwin

    It could be those bloody crypto-Protestants like G.K. Chesterton (talk about a mole, he wrote “Orthodoxy” years before he was even Catholic — clearly he didn’t think you had to be Catholic to be “orthodox”) and John Henry Newman (thank goodness many of the good Catholics of Birmingham saw through that anglo-Catholic retread) started the whole thing even longer ago than we imagine.We can’t be too vigilant in making sure that we purge out any tares in our wheat.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17428918256547725187 Sherry W

    I’ve never met an evangelical convert (and I know a lot of them around the country) who isn’t very serious about thinking and teaching with the Church. I’ve *never* met a single convert who had a “low” Christology but I met boatloads of cradle Catholics who do. That doesn’t mean we can’t and don’t make mistakes (just like cradle Catholics) but they are hardly ever matters of covert or intentional dissent. In our work at the Institute, we have always been painstakingly meticulous about this and had our stuff vetted at the highest levels of the Vatican – but it doesn’t matter around St. Blog’s because some of us are converts and therefore, automatically subject to suspicion.I have never, never, never met a convert from evangelicalism who wanted to preach a “Jesus and me” faith apart from the Church. Ever!!!!!! Only someone who has never made that journey could ever believe something so preposterous. I do hear that stuff from cradle Catholics (and I’ve worked with tens of thousands of them all over the world) but not converts. If we actually believed that for a moment, we wouldn’t stay, we’d just scuttle off back where we came from. I mean there is simply no point in being a Catholic then. But it doesn’t matter that we protest over and over that we don’t believe this and aren’t proposing it. We are converts and must be incapable of knowing what we really believe. I can’t help but get the impression that the only thing that would satisfy some people: the Church wiping and reformatting our mental hard drives during the Easter Vigil so that no memory of our unsavory Protestant past remained. And then of course, giving us a whole new mental operating system at confirmation: Traditionalist Catholic 1962 5.0!Only then would we be certified doctrinally and culturally pure enough to merit a place at the Eucharistic table.Fortunately for us, the Church hasn’t lost sight of her mission to offer the fullness of the faith to all – even those of us who had the incredibly bad taste to be born evangelicals.


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