Another Episcopalian Bishop Comes Home


News is in that John Lipscomb, Bishop of Southwest Florida recently resigned and has announced his intention to be received into full communion with the Catholic Church. You can find his open letter here. (H/T Amy Welborn)

Pray for him and his family and his people as they take this step of faith.

Amy also links to this moving letter from a young Baptist/fundamentalist who explains why he is joining the Catholic Church.

In two other developments, a young former fundamentalist Baptist truck driver in my RCIA course told me last week that his sister now wants to read More Christianity and is beginning to have serious questions about the Catholic faith.

In addition to this we have the joy of two more members of my own family enrolled in RCIA and looking forward to being received into the Church at Easter.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00447929797019147894 james hastings

    Dwight,Sorry, but in the interest of fairness, I thought I’d give a more balanced report, following this recent item on the BBC website:”Pope Benedict XVI has canonised Brazil’s first native-born saint, Friar Galvao, to the cheers of up to a million faithful gathered in Sao Paulo. The Church in Brazil hopes the Pope’s visit and the canonisation will help reinvigorate the local church, which has lost millions of faithful to evangelical churches.Lates score:RC Church 5Evangelical Church 4 millionBlessingsJames

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11357441841842897534 jasoncpetty

    Mr. Hastings,Remember when there were more Arians that Catholics? That ended well.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    Good to hear from you James, your sense of humor is wonderful!Of course, if we really wanted to keep score we’d have to take all the Christians down through the ages in every country and add them up.Let’s see–for the first 1500 years virtually all Christians were Catholics. Protestants have been around for 500 years. They’re still 1,000 years behind.David Barrett’s statistics for the year 2000 are: Catholics- 1,057,328,093 and Pentecostals – 523,777,994According to his predictions, in every 24 hour period there are 37,000 new Catholics and 30,000 new Pentecostal Charismatics.Certainly these are the two groups that are growing globally, but it looks like the Catholics still have the edge.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11357441841842897534 jasoncpetty

    And if the Church were actively engaged in sheep stealing in the US as vigorously as the Pentecostals are in Latin America, I would expect a correspondingly high percentage of conversions of American Protestants to the Fullness of Christ as preached by Rome.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04298493682961935337 Mrs Jackie Parkes MJ

    Oh my! That’s super news!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/08022966882127890835 Will Duquette

    James,Your point is well-taken. However….Many of the recent converts to Catholicism whose stories I’ve been reading have come from the Evangelical movement (you can’t really call it a single “church”). And uniformly they haven’t abandoned the desired to be evangelical (small “e”) to evangelize the world and bring the lost to Christ. And Pope Benedict has said that this is where the Roman Catholic Church needs to focus its efforts.It will be interesting to see what a little Evangelical leaven will do…and what can grow from a mustard seed.

  • Templar

    Father L;I don’t think you’re fighting fair with Mr. Hastings. You’re using facts and statistics against his generalities. Can’t we just keep this on the level of hyperbole?;-)

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17691145638703824456 kkollwitz

    More Christianity is a terrific book, very accessible and, well, winsome. I can’t wait to hear how she likes it. Keep us up to date on any developments.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01960521706457744649 tara

    Jesus, Himself said the gates of Hell would NEVER prevail against His church–so even if we get down to only one–it will be the only one with the fullness of Truth! The Roman Catholic Church is Jesus’ true Church–remember the only one handed down to us from the Apostles!The rest of the churches–take from our Holy Mother Church only the fruits they want–and leave the rest–because they want it “their way” not God’s way. We conform ourself to God, God does not conform Himself to us.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01960521706457744649 tara

    Oh, I forgot, Welcome Home!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00447929797019147894 james hastings

    Dear all,Salvation by math, Dwight, that’s a new one. Strange that when Evangelicals receive Catholics into the fold its called “sheep stealing.” But when Evangelicals convert to Catholicism, you guys bring out cuddly Marcus Grodi with his soft voice and weepy eye looking all-puppy like into camera four as he reflects on “the journey home.”I always smile at the phrase: “The Roman Catholic Church is Jesus’ true Church.” Faith lies in our soul, not our denomination. Its not like a golf club – yours has greener grass than mine.Blessingsjames

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    Hi James, I was just doing some sums like you were, but I agree with the other commentator that the Catholic Church is not determined by majority rule, but by validity of truth.I must say, the ad hominem attack on Marcus is a bit sharpish for you. I know Marcus, and I happen to know that his organization, Coming Home Network, has an explicit policy not to initiate any contact with a Protestant–seeking to convert them to Catholicism. They explicitly reject sheep stealing and only respond to enquirers who make the first approach to them. Before you go on the attack you should take the time to gather the facts.Catholics worldwide are never as aggressively anti-Protestant and intent on converting Protestants to Catholicism as Evangelicals are, by their most basic instincts, anti-Catholic and intentionally converting Catholics.The Conservative Evangelicals that I have had experience with have it as part of their basic training that Catholics are semi pagan, unsaved, lost and in need of converting to Protestantism, whereas Catholics regard Protestants as ‘separated brethren’ and rarely go out to actively seek conversions from other Christian groups.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    “Faith lies in our soul, not our denomination.”Whoops! We’re now back to our earlier conversation James. Why should the faith that lies in your soul be the correct one and the faith that lies in the soul of a Jehovah’s Witness or a Moonie be the incorrect one?You must have some criterion of judgment mustn’t you? The JW and the Moonie and the Seventh Day Adventist would say their faith in Jesus in their soul is just as real as yours. Why are they wrong and you are right?I assume you must judge by some criterion of doctrinal orthodoxy, and where can you find such a criterion except by the teaching of some denomination or theological viewpoint or another?With your personal subjectivist approach anything goes.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00447929797019147894 james hastings

    Dwight,You state “Catholics worldwide are never as aggressively anti-Protestant and intent on converting Protestants to Catholicism as Evangelicals are.”You obviously never grew up as a Catholic in the west of Scotland as I did. The priests I knew taught us that Protestants were essentially pagans, or at least devious sinners who were all doomed to hell unless they converted to Holy Mother Church immediately.It was the same in Ireland, and an Evangelical friend of mine who lives in Italy, tells me she regularly gets spat at by Catholic neighbours.Also, you are rather sensitive at me poking fun at ol’ Marcus, condeming me as a “bit sharpish.”I always try and live up to 1 Corr: 1: 3. It might have escaped your notice that of all the commentators who contribute to your comment box, I am the only one who always ends by offering blessings.BlessingsJames

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01960521706457744649 tara

    Faith lies in our soul, and Jesus, Himself, gave us His Church to nourish and sustain us on our journey Home! We have the fullness of truth–and yes that makes the grass at Jesus’ Church the greenest!If our grass was not so green, why do you then borrow our nutrients for your grass–i.e. the Bible? If His truth is in your soul–why do you then need our book? Just look into your own soul.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00447929797019147894 james hastings

    Hi Tara,For nearly 1600 years, most Catholics never even knew their denomination had something called a Bible, and of those who did, very few spoke enough Latin, Greek or Hebrew to understand it.The Catholic argument about keeping the Scripture secret was to prevent wrong translations. Maybe, just maybe, it was more about keeping control through clerical channels.Bible reading is a bit like tithing and fastings; we Evangelicals have picked up what you Catholics dropped long, long ago and replaced with saint devotion or relic worship.Catholics by and large don’t tithe, have given up Friday fasting and you’re more likely to find bingo groups in Catholic parishes than you will a Bible study group.How do I know? I was a Catholic for 40 years, that’s how. The exception is usually Charismatic Catholics who have their roots in……Pentecostalism. Strange thing that!BlessingsJames

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    Oh for goodness sake! Of course Catholics look bad if you assume Evangelicals are correct and then see all the things that Catholic don’t do that Evangelicals do well.We might just as well say, “You know, those Evangelicals don’t have the proper Scriptural veneration of the Blessed Virgin Mary, they deny the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, they refuse to acknowledge the true foundation of the Church which is Peter and his successors, they never use incense in worship which is Scriptural, they abhor the use of images which you find throughout the Bible, they don’t pray for the dead, which is Scriptural and they refuse to believe in the efficacy of the sacraments.In fact, Tara is correct, Evangelical worship and devotion–wonderful and Christ centered as it is–is merely a truncated and abbreviated form of Christianity which was derived from Catholicism in the first place.Everything good and positive and wonderful that the Evangelical affirms we also affirm. We simply don’t deny what you deny.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    James, rather than defend your personal attack on Marcus Grodi, shouldn’t you admit that his policy of not actively evangelising Protestants is actually rather impressive?

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01960521706457744649 tara

    For many years most lay people did not know how to read–in any language. And when Evangelical’s picked up our book–in any language–instead of listening to the Holy Spirit, working through our Holy Mother Church, they developed many wrong translations based on their own personal beliefs. The result is how many denominations? And you say this is a good thing? My friend, you are being deceived.And now you claim that all Catholics do not read the Bible but play bingo and worship relics? How absurd!

  • http://thesheepfold.typepad.com/ The Sheepcat

    How quickly this thread has been pulled off course! It is truly wonderful news that this Episcopal bishop is coming home. Lipscomb’s letter of resignation is a model of graciousness, as was Steenson’s two months ago. That should say something about the Holy Spirit’s activity within their destination.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00447929797019147894 james hastings

    Dwight,You entry begining “Oh, for goodness sake,” is dangerously close to supporting the Evangelical view of Catholicism. Are you starting on your own “journey home?” Read it again.And I have not made a “personal attack” on Marcus Grodi. I enjoy his programme because, like your book More Christianity, it tells my journey home in reverse. Both were instrumental in helping me throw out all the Catholic clutter like purgatory, Marian worship, hierarchy, suffering theology etc. Tara – if I’d never been a member of the Catholic denomination, you would say I’ve no experience so how can I make such claims? When I say I was a member for 40 years, you simply dismiss my comments as “absurd.”The facts are simple. In 40 years as a Catholic, I attended several parishes across Scotland and England and none of them EVER had a Bible study group. My brother is a Catholic and his parish does not have a Bible study group. My oldest sister is a nun and her parish does not have a Bible study group. My business colleague is a Catholic and his parish does not have a Bible study group – but they all DO have bingo clubs and my brother’s has a relic regularly on display for worship. Facts is facts.The truest Catholics are those in the Charismatic movement which has its roots in Protestantism and the early church; the rest of you only have your roots in Catholicism.BlessingsJames

  • Julie

    Looking from the outside, and from the nature of the comments here, I see that the Catholic commenters display a real graciousness and Christianity obviously at work, whereas James reminds me of the fallen angel. His form of Christianity is causing him to indulge in ridicule, insults, and his Christianity is a score card. Sorry, that is just what I am observing here.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    This is what I can’t figure out James: You can be a full member of the Catholic Church in good standing without excessive Marian devotion, devotion to relics or bingo. Most Catholics I know have a moderate devotion to Mary, (if any at all) have never seen a relic (or if they did, didn’t know what it was) and they’re not opposed to Bible study groups. It’s just like many many Protestants, their church doesn’t have one and they don’t like that sort of thing.As a Catholic you don’t need to do the excessive things you dislike. In addition you are totally free to start charismatic prayer groups, go on Cursillo courses, belong to Catholic Charismatic renewal and join the Cor et Lumen Community.Within Catholicism you can actually be the sort of Christian you want to be James. Therefore, why not come Home to Rome and simply be a charismatic, Bible studying, evangelizing Catholic? No one is going to make you go on a pilgrimage to Fatima, kiss the Pope’s toe or say ten rosaries every day.Within Catholicism we affirm all those good things you are affirming. We just don’t deny other good things…like Bingo :-)You spend a lot of time knocking the Catholic Church, but I don’t think most of us Catholics spend the same amount of time and energy attacking Protestantism.Goodness knows there are plenty of targets within Charismatic Evangelicalism: super wealthy televangelists, shallow emotionalism, ‘heavy shepherding’, Toronto blessing type phenomena, the prosperity gospel, spiritual abuse, Africans who ‘cure’ childless couples by giving them unwanted infants and making them pay, ‘exorcisms’ in which children die or are beaten senseless…Catholics might have a hay day with such stuff, but usually the majority of us keep mum.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00447929797019147894 james hastings

    Dwight,Dear boy, you paint such a beautiful, balanced picture of the Catholic church, almost Evelyn Waughish in its description. I nearly cried. If it actually existed, I’d be knocking on your parish door tomorrow. You want me to come home. I would, but……The Catholic Charismatic Renewal, by the power and authority (that word again) of the Holy Spirit has brought about a second Reformation of the Roman church. However, Renewal is stifled by the Vatican’s spiritual bureaucracy, lugubrious worship, clerical dominance, saint devotion, false teaching (purgatory, indulgences etc) and spectator style praise. Most Catholics still regard Charismatic Renewal with suspicion and as a “Protestant thing.”I couldn’t live with that.You say most Catholics have a “moderate devotion to Mary. “ Do you think my wife would forgive me for sleeping with my neighbour if I defended it as a “moderate adultery?”I couldn’t live with that.You say Catholics like “many, many Protestants” don’t have a Bible study group and “don’t like that sort of thing.” Dwight, as a one time Evangelical, you know that is just nonsense in every way. All the Protestant churches I know have a Bible study group which is well attended and members love that “sort of thing.”I’m not against bingo. But bingo or Bible? Not a difficult choice.I couldn’t live with a church which chooses bingo. Or relics.You say I am always knocking Catholicism and add: “I don’t think most of us Catholics spend the same amount of time and energy attacking Protestantism.Dwight, don’t you read your own blog or those named on your favourite blog list?On the current page of your blog, almost every entry is a cheap, cynical, gleeful dig at Protestantism and how it is, in your eyes, falling apart.Look at: ECUSA Diocese of Fort Worth Plans To Pull Out; Wimmin Priests; Baldies Beware (with a picture of Bob Jones); Benedict and Bartholomew; or this very entry, Another Episcopalian Bishop Comes Home. You would do better to build up Catholicism, rather than trying to tear down Protestanism. You charge me with doing one thing, then go ahead and do it yourself.I couldn’t live with that.Finally, for every excess at the Toronto Blessing (which has brought huge spiritual riches) there is a Catholic Moving Statue Devotion; for every shallow emotionalism at a Charismatic service, there is the doleful fakery of a Latin mumbler; for every excess of the Evangelical prosperity Gospel, there is a false Catholic poverty Gospel (Jesus loved the poor, not poverty); for every wealthy televangelist there is a bishop with a large car, house and pantry, and a pope who lives above the world’s most expensive art gallery.I couldn’t live with any of those.Home to Rome? I have never felt so much at home as I do in the Pioneer Church. When I left Catholicism, I truly went home – home to a personal, loving, dynamic, life-changing relationship with Jesus, rather than an estranged connection with a man made church and its dogmas and doctrines.I couldn‘t live there anymore.Dwight, you have been a generous host. You have allowed me much space on your blog and I thank you for that. We have had many enjoyable debates.I think it is now time for me to move on. I have always said I never want to convert you or anyone to Evangelism; I just want you to shake off the Spiritual shackles and live a true Catholicism.I don’t want to end on a negative. There is much in the Catholic church I admire and even envy. I hate it when some Evangelicals claim all Catholics are essentially pagans and going to hell. That is not true. There is salvation in the Roman Catholic Church. I think you are a talented writer and I am sure your sermons are funny and theologically sound in many aspects. I know you are a great priest.I extend my prayers to you and all your commentators. I wish you all a Blessed Christmas and a prosperous New year. May God bless you all and may you live an abundant life in every sense of that word.As always, I leave you with 1 Corr: 1- 3. (Sorry, you Catholics don’t have Bibles!) “Grace and peace to you from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.”BlessingsJames

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12373317560249811006 Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    thanks James. God bless you! You’re always welcome here!

  • Mark

    Hi James,I’ve been watching this thread, and would like to comment on a few points you make. If you grew up in the west of Scotland you know that the Rangers- Celtic Darby is a two way affair. I can tell equally hair raising stories about growing up in Clyde Bank during the 20s. 30s and 40s and being condemned to hell by the fiery wee-frees and the manse. But it proves nothing, just that people can be clannish, tribal and not infrequently violent. It says nothing about the Christian faith of any believer.I am puzzled at your assertion, especially being 40 years Catholic, that we worship relics, you affirm it as a fact, and because of what you say, obviously still believe it is what we Catholics do. I’m sorry, you were either a very poorly catechised catholic or an indifferent one who cared very little about his faith and its teachings. This ignorance somewhat undermines your claim as a 40 year left-footer, or at least as a credible expert on your Christian origins. I suspect Vat2 has a lot to answer for but that’s another question.Pax VobiscumMark

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00447929797019147894 james hastings

    Hi Mark,I promised Dwight I’d opt out of his blog and let him get on writing about other things, but I feel rude not replying to you. So, please, no one else ask me a question. Make all the points you wish, but no questions as I’ll not reply, not out of rudeness, but otherwise I’ll never leave this blog.I know a lot of American Catholics feel persecuted by the Southern Evangelicals/Baptists. I deplore and condemn it. My reference to the west of Scotland was simply to show religious enmity is universal and on both sides. Southern Baptists growl at Catholics, Catholics in Scotland growl at Protestants, Protestants return the favour and my Evangelical friend in Italy has neighbours who simply refuse to speak to her because she is not Catholic. Or worse, because she is Evangelical. That kind of clannish, tribal behaviour, as you rightly state, has nothing to do with faith, whether its west of Scotland Catholics or Southern Evangelicals. You seem to doubt that I’m a 40-year left-footer (that expression will confuse the Americans.) Well, I’ve already been called a liar by one of Dwight’s commentators who seemed to think I was really a Southern Evangelical trying to sneak under the wire.So, for the record, I am 48 and left the Catholic church about five years ago. Look at my earlier comment on Dwight’s blog outlining my Catholic background or my profile on my own blog. I assure you I am a white, Scottish 40 something ex-Catholic who used to attend Mass every Sunday, sometimes mid-week also, said the rosary had a devotion to the Little Flower, still know all the lyrics to Faith of Our Fathers, know what a scapular is, been to Lourdes twice, was an altar boy, served at Benediction, (my favourite) was a reader at Mass, a Special Minister of the Eucharist and I studied more about Louise de Montfort, Thomas Aquinas and John of the Cross than I ever did about Jesus. Until I left. I think its too easy to blame Vatican II for poor catechism. My mother was born in 1914, so she grew up in a pre-Vat II church. Yet, her generation also got confused about the difference between worshipping Mary and having a devotion , or praying with relics and praying to relics. Its not Vat II that’s to blame, its the practice itself.But please also read how I value the Catholic church. It has much that is good within it, including salvation. Now, goodbye y’all. Keep the Faith. Excuse me! You know I mean the Christian Faith.BlessingsJames

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15800531286676786803 The Perpetual Malcontent

    I’ve observed that those who eagerly taunt Catholics for holding on to “traditions of men” are those who can’t seem to let go of man-made myths they learned from their preachers, especially those regarding the Catholic Church. When their fantasies are refuted, they still cling on them, as if those who have demolished their silly ideas conspired to hide the truth from them and the rest of the world. Strange minds these our separated brethren have. You just need to visit Youtube for a good dose. I’ve noticed that those who do honestly and sincerely search for the truth find themselves to the Church, whilst those who still hang on to their man-made myths and traditions bury themselves beneath enourmous piles of BS just to flee from confronting Truth. Protestantism is a mere shadow of Catholicism. Shed more light on the Catholic Church and the shadow shrinks.

  • Mark

    James,This is not a question.I gave the wrong impression if you think I was questioning your Catholic history, just your knowledge of the faith, which as you know Protestants level as a common complaint against Catholics, with some justifications in my opinion. I have never worshipped a statue, a relic, the saints or the Blessed Virgin, venerated, honoured or prayed to for intersession as appropriate yes but never worshipped, only God is worshipped, this is what the Church teaches and has always taught. I was surprised that you seemed to think different that’s all and if this were the case I would say we have let you down and are the poorer for it. From your CV I can see you are on a journey, you are being guided for something, paradise we hope but I would just say don’t close your mind to the option of one day returning to the faith. If we need anything we need knowledgeable Christians to re-evangelise our Catholic faith, (guess which famous German said as much recently [Hint, he has a big place in Rome]). Anyway in my parish Bible study is Tuesday evening, we don’t have Bingo. Bon Voyage, you take the high road and I’ll take the low and I expect we’ll arrive at the same place eventually, God willing.Mark

  • Anonymous

    Father Dwight, your charity toward the troll masquerading as “James Hastings” is a model of charity. Now I know why I’m not a blogger, and and I know how much work the Lord has to do on me before I’m remotely as patient and forbearing as you are! God bless you, and thank you for your inspiring example. To Mr. Hastings — well, let’s not go there. I’m just going to pray for him — to the Little Flower and to Our Lady!

  • http://thesheepfold.typepad.com/ The Sheepcat

    The priests I knew taught us that Protestants were essentially pagans, or at least devious sinners who were all doomed to hell unless they converted to Holy Mother Church immediately.James may well have taken his leave of this blog, but I hope he realizes the Catholic Church excommunicated Father Feeney for teaching this heresy.

  • Mark

    To James Hastings,I can sympathize with you that you didn’t find Christ until you left the Church. Any Church will have weaker or stronger parishes, weaker or stronger times. I too am your age, 48, and I was raised Catholic at a time when I think the Church was at a low point. I think the Church in the 1960′s did a great job in teaching us the basics of Confession, Communion,and Confirmation but Catholic education pretty much stopped there. After that we got a bland mush of colored felt banners, folk Masses, vague spirituality and pointless sermons.But that’s all in the past. I recently came back to the Church after never really being a Catholic as an adult and I found that all the parishes in the Arlington diocese have Bible studies. Call it the John Paul II generation coming of age, or a revival, or a renewal or a reformation. Whatever you call it, it’s real, it’s Biblical and it’s Catholic.Despite your list of how you were a Catholic, most of what you described was that you had a childhood education as a Catholic, but that you didn’t continue your education in the faith. Going to Mass on Sundays is great and all, but that’s a lot different from learning about the faith. You say that the parishes around you didn’t and still don’t have Bible study. I can believe that. This is what I meant by the Church being at a low point. But that doesn’t change the fact that Catholic teaching is based on Jesus, on the Word of God, and is filled with the Spirit. All that you have said is that you didn’t hear it, and that your parish failed to teach it. However, even without knowing the Biblical basis for its teaching, I’m sure the Church gave you its true teachings, things such as the Real Presence, spiritual regeneration through Baptism and the special place of Mary in salvation. I think both of us would prefer to have all this taught so that we understand why the Church believes this, but it has to be better to have the correct teaching with little understanding of scriptural references, than to have all kinds of Bible study with doctrinal errors.What I’ve found in talking to people like you, who left the Church after never really understanding it is that at some weak point in their spiritual life, they were met by some well-meaning, but virulently anti-Catholic evangelicals who did teach the Bible, that is THEIR own personal view of the Bible, but mixed in is also an un-healthy dose of anti-Catholic hatred. It seems that your faith is in Jesus, but also in anti-Catholicism. I’ve seen this before. What bothers me most about this is that you’ve been taught a brand of Christianity that is based on hating the Church. I don’t see, and have never seen a similar hatred in the Catholic Church.I can understand your disappointment that the Church didn’t properly educate you. I feel the same way too. But at least as far as I am concerned, I also did not reach out to be educated.After decades of abuse at the mouths of fundamentalists, the Church in America at least is gearing up to defend itself and is arming us with knowledge of the Bible. When I had left the Church, I found that I had picked up inadvertently many Protestant beliefs. Upon my return to the Church I found to my surprise that it’s the Protestants who are not following the Bible. I’m sure many Catholics are familiar with this, that Protestants will seize upon one verse, but ignore the others. Truly the New Testament is not meant to be an A to Z guide to teaching Christianity. If it were, there wouldn’t be all the thousands of competing denominations of Protestants. The apostles and their successors did not preach Christianity by reading the New Testament to their people. They couldn’t have as it wasn’t written or canonized yet. They taught Christianity orally, with references to the Jewish Bible. This lead to the formation of the Church. The Church canonized the Bible by being filled with the Spirit. The Church was founded by Jesus and the Spirit, not by reading the Bible, each man with his own interpretation.This gets me back to your comments about how you say that the Bible doesn’t teach devotion to Mary, the Mass, the intercession of saints, etc. The real truth is that the group that you belong to doesn’t have this in it’s own particular, man-based version of the Bible. What I’ve seen is that the default position of Protestants to to just be against anything that is Catholic.Take as a prime example, John 3. Protestants somehow twist this clear reference (born again from above by water and Spirit) not to Baptism but to natural, mundane human birth. I just heard someone the other day say that the water here refers to the amniotic fluids of birth. If they were not so emotionally tied to the Protestant error, they would clearly see this refers to the waters of Baptism. Another great example is how Protestant theology is built on the error or “faith alone”, despite the fact that the only time “faith alone” is used in the Bible is to say “NOT by faith alone.” Like it or not, the Protestant world is going to have to get used to a generation of Catholics who know and love the Word of God, and are not fooled by shallow readings of the New Testament.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X