Pullman on Pullman

Evidently the Pullman movie is not as bad as the books. The problem remains that very often the films draw the viewers to read the book.

If you’re in any doubt about Philip Pullman’s intentions, here are his own words:

“‘I’m trying to undermine the basis of Christian belief,’ says Pullman. ‘Mr. Lewis [C.S. Lewis, author of The Chronicles of Narnia] would think I was doing the devil’s work’” (from the Washington Post, Feb. 19, 2001). And, “I’ve been surprised by how little criticism I’ve got. Harry Potter’s been taking all the flak…. Meanwhile, I’ve been flying under the radar, saying things that are far more subversive than anything poor old Harry has said. My books are about killing God” (from the Sydney Morning Herald, Dec. 13, 2003).

h/t St Mary Magdalene Brighton and Bonfire of the Vanities.

  • blarg

    The trap is set. From Walmart to the university book store, His Dark Materials is front and center, flat, flush and full. He condensed the entire trilogy into a single text with a cute fluffy bear on the cover. In other words, it is poison in a soft candy shell readily available to the unaware.

  • Anonymous

    I am going to put some Narnia books in pride of place in the window this Christmas of the secondhand bookshop were I work. If anyone asks me for Pullman’s books I gravely but politely enlighten them to his ‘beliefs’ and say that they might find them in the Biffa bin where I cheerfully drop them where they belong. It’s satisfying getting a few out of circulation. I read all three years ago to be well informed on the content and was quite disturbed. Rather sad.

  • Anonymous

    Have you people ever considered it is just precisely all the ranting and raving about these books that is going to push them (and already has) into the best seller lists? the more publicity (negative or positive) this generates the more people are going to read these terrible books you so fear.

  • blarg

    dear anonymous,His Dark Materials targets children as only a story could, since Pullman provides no proof in argumentation. For example, Preemptive Absolution is a chapter in the Trilogy where a priest attempts to atone for a murder he expects to commit in the future. A grown adult through experience or education would know this claim is false, and could detect Pullman’s purpose in the books. The purpose Pullman announced himself, “I’m trying to undermine the basis of Christian belief.” Children, on the other hand, are gullible; they buy into outrageous claims wholesale. This is the danger. Educating adults about Pullman’s agenda will help them choose better books for their children. Yes, negative publicity is still publicity, so to preach to children about the dangers of Pullman might encourage them to read the books; however, parents still have to buy the books for them.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05127202199834183627 Liz

    What’s truly sad is that the UCCB, through their movie review person, has put the stamp of approval on the movie (which will doubtless lead children to the books) and that Nicole Kidman (supposedly a practicing Catholic) is one of the stars of the movie. I don’t debate at all the right of Catholic actors to portray roles that are of immoral characters. After all immoral characters of part of the world we live in. However, I have a far more difficult time justifying acting in a film based on a book whose author makes such anti-Christian claims about his intentions in the work itself.

  • Anonymous

    These happenings occur in an alternate universe, so all the events are no intended to be fact. Pullman doesn’t actually believe that God was the first angel and is very old, he is simply created a fantasy land like Narnia or LOTR.

  • Anonymous

    These happenings occur in an alternate universe, so all the events are no intended to be fact. Pullman doesn’t actually believe that God was the first angel and is very old, he is simply created a fantasy land like Narnia or LOTR.


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