Guest Blogger Jeff Miller

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Jeff Miller (aka The Curt Jester) is an application developer and retired Navy Chief who spent 40 years in the wilderness of atheism and finds himself both astonished and joyful to be a member of the Catholic Church. He blogs at Curt Jester with humorous and hilarious insights on stuff Catholic political and cultural. It’s papistical [Read More...]

Christ in Creation from Frank Viola’s Jesus: A Theography

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Instead of a simple book review I’m using Frank Viola and Leonard Sweet’s book Jesus: A Theography as a jumping off point for a couple of posts. First of all– a couple of reasons why I like this book and recommend it to you. First, the content is solid and scholarly, but Second, it’s written in [Read More...]

Would Jesus Recognize Catholic Worship?

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  I posted a picture the other day of  worship at St Peter’s. There was a crowd of altar servers, robed clergy in procession and clouds of incense. In the combox someone observed, “Would Jesus recognize this as worship?” I don’t know the commenter and his background, but it sounds like the comment is based [Read More...]

The Strength of Kolbe

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Here is a good post on the martyrdom of Maximillian Kolbe. I wrote last week about sanctity versus being good. The atheist will explain altruism in evolutionary terms: “Don’t you see that for the survival of the tribe primitive people soon began to see that altruism helped them to survive as a people. If they [Read More...]

Sin or Sanctity?

Sin is monotonous. Sanctity is totally original. Underneath this observation lurks a deeper truth–that sin is boring. We believe in original sin, but there is nothing original about sin. This is because evil is derivative. Satan cannot create anything, all he can do is twist or destroy or distort what is good. Take any sin [Read More...]

Monotonous Sinners and Sparkling Saints

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C.S. Lewis once observed, ‘How monotonously alike all the great tyrants and conquerors have been: how gloriously different are the saints.’ In his little biographies of Thomas Aquinas and Saint Francis of Assisi, G.K.Chesterton revelled in the sparkling individuality of both saints.  Aquinas was the greatest philosopher of his time while Francis was a troubadour [Read More...]


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