Monotonous Sinners and Sparkling Saints

Therese2

C.S. Lewis once observed, ‘How monotonously alike all the great tyrants and conquerors have been: how gloriously different are the saints.’ In his little biographies of Thomas Aquinas and Saint Francis of Assisi, G.K.Chesterton revelled in the sparkling individuality of both saints.  Aquinas was the greatest philosopher of his time while Francis was a troubadour [Read More...]

On Morality and Martyrdom

isaacjogues

A debate has been cooking amongst various bloggers who are atheists about whether there is such a thing as objective morality. I was interested in the observations that animals behave in a ‘moral’ way–elephants grieve their dead herd members, dogs stand loyally beside the grave of their dead master, monkeys share and gorillas are tender [Read More...]

Lions, Little Children and Tiber Swims

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Did you know that Ignatius of Antioch was not only appointed to the see of Antioch by Peter himself, but tradition has it that he was one of the children that the Lord took up in his arms and blessed? Ignatius of Antioch was martyred in the Roman Coliseum  by being devoured by beasts. On [Read More...]

Teresa of Avila and the Infant of Prague

infant_jesus_of_prague

Did you know that the original Infant of Prague was owned by St Teresa of Avila? Here’s the story: In 1628 the small, 19″ wooden, wax coated statue was given by the Spanish princess Polyxena Lobkowicz to the Discalced Carmelites. The princess who was Spanish, had received the statue as a wedding gift in 1603 [Read More...]

Immaculate Mary for a Protestant

maryHeart

OK, so I’m just a poor convert right, who even after sixteen years being a Catholic am still struggling to understand some things. I was prompted a week or so ago to begin my day as soon as I wake up to say the Morning Offering…which goes, “O Jesus, through the Immaculate Heart of Mary [Read More...]

The Erosion of Freedom

Sir_Thomas_More

On this feast day of St Thomas More we do well to remember that the Tudor Revolution in England (sometimes given the euphemistic term: Reformation) was not immediately violent and catastrophic. It began with Henry VIII and his counsellors deciding that the church courts should not deal with cases of civil law. In the Middle [Read More...]


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