Mesmerizing Time-Lapse Imagery of Austria’s Lake Hallstatt

This, my friends, is what’s known as “doing time-lapse video right.” (HD imperative.)

Lake Hallstatt has been referred to as the “melancholic lake”, the “still fjord” and the “vision of a perfect mountain lake”. It is a classic relic of the Ice Age and it has a total area of 858 square metres lying between the steep Obertraun and Hallstatt mountains and Bad Goisern. It is the fifth largest of the Salzkammergut lakes.

Gorgeous, breathtaking stuff. I’m not a fan of the music — too nebulous for my strict tastes — but the combination of the area’s brilliant night sky and the lake’s reflective properties is visually spectacular. Also, time-lapse fog is never a bad idea. (HT to the aptly-named “Timelapse.org,” which includes links to creator Geoff Tompkinson’s Vimeo, Facebook, and YouTube pages.)

About Joseph Susanka

Joseph has been doing development work for institutions of Catholic higher education since graduating from Thomas Aquinas College in 1999. A grateful resident of Wyoming, he spends his free time exploring the beautiful Wind River Mountains, keeping track of his (currently) seven sons, and thanking his lucky stars for Netflix.

  • http://fpb.livejournal.com/ Fabio P.Barbieri

    Lake Hallstatt is also famous for its magnificent and immensely significant Celtic iron age finds.

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/summathissummathat/ Joseph Susanka

      Is this what you’re talking about, Fabio? Very interesting…

  • Maggie Goff

    This is breathtaking.

  • pianogirl88

    I actually thought the music was about perfect for the video, although The Lark Ascending (Vaughn-Williams) would also be lovely. Look for the one by Andrew Hardy on You Tube for your listening pleasure.

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/summathissummathat/ Joseph Susanka

      “The Lark Ascending” would have been perfect, PianoGirl. (Is this the recording you’re thinking of?)

      For some reason, the first piece that popped into my head when considering replacement music was the Ballade from Sibelius’ Karelia Suite. That would have made me very, very happy.


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