Boss-Level Beatboxing

Here’s a faithful reenactment of my response to Tom Thum’s TEDxSydney video, which I stumbled across for the first time late last night.

1. Winced through the needlessly-suggestive 45-second open, wherein Mr. Thum seemed to be struggling to find the correct balance between “Trying to be funny” and “Actually being funny.”

2. Then a miracle occurred.

3. Paused to pick my jaw up off the floor at the 3-minute mark (or so). Continued.

4. Hit the 3:30 section, and lost my mind.

5. Paused to pick my jaw up off the floor (again), and to contemplate the various ways I’ve been wasting my life. Regrouped. Went on.

6. Sailed smoothly past the 6-minute mark, though everything was growing a bit hazy. Probably a blood-pressure issue.

7. Hit the jazz club, and stopped for the umpteenth time to deal with the jaw. Decided to just leave it on the floor, in the interest of time. It’s not like I didn’t now where it was going to be later.

8. Finished, and realized that I had a moral imperative to share this with everyone I’ve ever known. And probably with a lot of folks I don’t know in the slightest.

So, enjoy. (Remember, give it a minute or so. You won’t regret it.)

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When I was growing up, my father use to fascinate my sibling and I for hours with nothing more than the inexplicable noises he could make with his mouth. And I’ve been captivated by beatboxing and mouth music ever since. There’s something so fantastical to me about these these sorts of  things, though I suppose I shouldn’t be surprised at out ability to make instrumental sounds with nothing more than “the original instrument.”

Still, this level of mimicry? This is just nuts.

About Joseph Susanka

Joseph has been doing development work for institutions of Catholic higher education since graduating from Thomas Aquinas College in 1999. A grateful resident of Wyoming, he spends his free time exploring the beautiful Wind River Mountains, keeping track of his (currently) seven sons, being amazed by his (currently) lone daughter, and thanking his lucky stars for Netflix.

  • Maggie Goff

    Fantastic! Loved your link to your piece on Bobby McFerrin, too. I was at a performance of his in Phoenix in late 90′s or 2000, can’t remember, but this comment on a video of him and his audience singing Ave Maria was spot on: “Seeing Bobby is a trip. He crowd sources musical ability, and you BECOME a musical instrument. Even if you can’t carry a tune and had no formal training, you get sucked in and become a part of it. It’s eerie, and amazing!” I was with one of my sisters and we had the absolute BEST time that night. We were also invited backstage, as one of the performers was a friend of one of my brothers from CA. (The food was all very healthy and no alcohol. I was impressed) What a blessing that your father gave you such an appreciation for this wonderful form o fmusic.


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