New Article in “Free Inquiry”!

Greg Epstein and I recently authored an article for the magazine Free Inquiry prefiguring our upcoming book The Godless Congregation! Here’s a snippet:

Something interesting is happening: across the United States and increasingly even the world, atheists are coming together not to debate but to celebrate. Moving beyond discussions of the existence of God and the evils of religion, groups of nonbelievers are meeting to ask the big questions that animate human life: Who are we? Why are we here? How should we live? They listen, discuss, and exchange ideas. They share the joys and struggles of their lives. They deepen their relationships. They affirm existence as they listen to poetry or music; some even sing together. But most of all they seek, together, to live fuller, richer, more meaningful lives: lives informed by reason, infused with compassion, and guided by hope for the future of humankind.

Read the full article here!

About James Croft

James Croft is the Leader in Training at the Ethical Culture Society of St. Louis - one of the largest Humanist congregations in the world. He is a graduate of the Universities of Cambridge and Harvard, and is currently writing his Doctoral dissertation as a student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is an in-demand public speaker, an engaging teacher, and a passionate activist for human rights. James was raised on Shakespeare, Sagan and Star Trek, and is a proud, gay Humanist. His upcoming book "The Godless Congregation", co-authored with New York Times bestselling author Greg Epstein, is being published by Simon & Schuster.

  • mkbell

    I think that the article that you and Greg wrote is excellent.
    I did find the whole issue of Free Inquiry amusing though. CSH has spent so much time bashing religious humanism and yet now one or more CFI’s have embraced the Sunday Assembly. The only way they can wrap their head around that is to decide that the religious humanism that they have been bashing is some sort of transcendentalism that predates humanism and that the new movement is not really religious humanism but something different, “Congregational Humanism”. By the way, I do think that Congregational Humanism is a better descriptor, but the way the whole thing was put together is amusing.


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