In Russia, Two Men Holding Hands is a Revolutionary Act

The BBC reports today on a viral video from Russia, showing two men holding hands as they walk through Moscow. The reactions of those they pass – ranging from mild rebukes to homophobic slurs to physical altercations – demonstrate that, in today’s Russia, two men holding hands is revolutionary. As the video itself says, “On [Read More…]

Death Is Not the Answer

I remember the Boston Marathon Bombings. I remember hearing of the attack on the radio, and wondering if my friends running and watching the marathon were alright. I remember being locked down in my apartment as news of the unfolding manhunt trickled in: an MIT policeman killed, a shootout in Watertown, the dramatic discovery of [Read More…]

5 Things Humanists Can Learn from “Welcome to Night Vale”

Tuesday night, I sat in a packed auditorium while the Secret Police tried to determine the identity of a murderer through an evening of Mystery Dinner Theatre. At first, it was a total mystery, and the killer ran rampant – even killing other guests at the Dinner! But soon I developed a tentative alliance with another [Read More…]

Love, Lust, and the Bible: A Further Response to Matthew Vines

Matthew Vines, author of God and the Gay Christian (and subject of yesterday’s post), kindly responded to my critique on Facebook: Thank you for writing this post and for sharing your perspective about what I’m doing. Thanks also for reading and engaging with my book.Some of your criticisms, however, are factually wrong. While it is [Read More…]

God and the Gay Humanist – A Response to Matthew Vines

Matthew Vines‘ God and the Gay Christian has become something of a phenomenon. Charting Vines’ journey – with his family – from coming out to his Christian parents as gay to convincing them that the Bible really does “affirm” LGBT people, the book is essentially an investigation of what the Bible says about same-sex relationships. Weaving scriptural criticism and analysis [Read More…]

Why Protest a History Museum?

Tonight I attended a protest outside the Missouri History Museum, and since some have asked me why, I thought I’d write a quick post about the issues as I see them. The protest stemmed from the museum’s decision to cancel an event which would have explored the concept of solidarity through the experience of activists from the [Read More…]

Humanism at Yale Week!

The Yale Humanist Community – an exceptional group of Humanists led by Humanist interfaith activist Chris Stedman – is hosting a fantastic panoply of events in the second week of April – Humanism at Yale Week. From discussion panels to service projects, the week promises a wide-ranging exploration of what it means to be a Humanist [Read More…]

Utah Non-Discrimination Law: Compromise or Capitulation?

An unlikely alliance of LGBTQ organizations and the Mormon Church this week announced joint support for a proposed law in the Utah Senate seeking to protect LGBTQ people from discrimination in the workplace while respecting “religious freedom”. Hailed by some as a significant political achievement and a model of mature governance, others suggest that LGBTQ [Read More…]

Bartlet vs. Underwood

Who’d you vote for for President: Jed Bartlet of The West Wing, or Frank Underwood of House of Cards? I’ve been watching House of Cards, catching up on Season 2 before binging on the newly-released Season 3. It’s taut, tense drama with some incredible performances. There are delicious moments of skulduggery and intrigue. Each time Kevin Spacey looks [Read More…]

Yes, Atheists Can Be Conservatives. But Why Would We Want To?

Last week atheist activist and radio host Jamila Bey became the first person ever to address the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) on behalf of atheist voters. Representing American Atheists Inc., Bey took the floor to ask conservatives to “embrace” atheists, pleading “let me vote for GOP candidates”. Her message was simple: there are more and more [Read More…]