The Atheist Who Spoke to God

Transcend

In high school I sang with a four part harmony ensemble. Three friends and I brushed up on spirituals, madrigals, and little-known choral works by major composers, and worked with a music teacher to polish them to perfection. Then we would perform in concerts with other students, our singing complementing piano pieces and string quartets. [Read More...]

The Art of Social Protest

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Protest is an art form: a way of bringing to the surface structural inequality and injustice so that people can glimpse, if only for a moment, the invisible cage which constantly imprisons oppressed people. Artful protests reveal inequalities in surprising and provocative ways while remaining non-violent and invitational, inspiring people to think and act differently rather [Read More...]

Gifts from GALA – A Sense of Solidarity

It’s easy to talk about being part of a “movement”. It’s a lot harder to get people to feel like they are part of a movement, to feel responsibility for each other, to feel like they share a common cause, to feel love for each other. But last week I felt it. I felt, deep in my core, what it means to be part of the LGBTQ Chorus movement, I felt the cause is righteous, and I knew that we can use the power of music to change lives. It was an experience I will carry with me for the rest of my life, and I’m certain that the youth on that stage will remember it always, too. [Read more...]

Singing Together: “No, Please, NO!” or “Sing Aloud!”? – Humanism and Song, Part Two

Giving voice in song should be considered a deep human need. And if Humanist communities are good for anything, they should attempt to fulfill human needs. Avoiding communal singing simply because it is a practice that is common in religious spaces is irrational. We should not forfeit valuable activities which promote human flourishing simply because the religious do them too. When it comes to singing together, we should not cut out our secular tongue to spite others’ religious face. [Read more...]

The Profane Harp – Humanism and Song, Part One

The experience is intoxicating, enhanced by the prismatic paintings behind the singers, by the ecstatic look on their faces, the feeling of my blood pumping in my ears, breath bursting from my lungs, crazy colors on the wall, vibrations in the gut, tingle in the hands, song in my soul. This is singing. I am enveloped by the song, carried up by it, exalted and exulting. [Read more...]

Foundations of the Temple

In his speech “The Gods” (1872), the “Great Agnostic” Robert Ingersoll, a Humanist and the best-known orator of his time, said the following:

“We are laying the foundations of the grand temple of the future–not the temple of all the gods, but of all the people”.

In 1873, echoing Ingersoll’s powerful oration, Felix Adler, founder of the Ethical Culture movement, called for the creation of the “Temple of the Future, [with] Justice its foundation, Peace and Goodwill its columns.”

Ingersoll and Adler’s vision of a more just world, governed by reason and compassion rather than superstition and greed – a vision shared by freethinkers across the ages – is the primary inspiration for this site. [Read more...]


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