Desire Matters, Truth Matters More – Alex Gabriel and Jeff Cook on “Unbelievable?”

Unbelievable

Alex Gabriel of The Heresy Club, one of my favorite online atheists, was a thoughtful and precise presence on Christian radio show Unbelievable? - a show which “gets Christians and non-Christians talking”. Listen to Alex discuss God with Jeff Cook, author of Everything New, and elucidate some of the strange holes in Cook’s (I thought rather weak) arguments. Cook is [Read More...]

Probabilistic Arguments for the Existence of God: James Croft Vs. David Glass on ‘Unbelievable?’

Last week I appeared for the third time on Premier Christian Radio’s discussion show Unbelievable?, hosted by Justin Brierley. This time I was speaking with David Glass (a Lecturer in the University of Ulster’s School of Computing and Mathematics) about his new book, Atheism’s New Clothes: Exploring and Exposing the Claims of the New Atheists. We [Read More...]

‘Unbelievable?’ – Was Jesus Liar, Lunatic or Lord? Discussing CS Lewis’ Apologetics

My second appearance on Unbelievable?, a Premier Christian Radio show hosted by Justin Brierley. Here I debate Ken Samples of apologetics organization Reasons to Believe. [Read more...]

Debating Apologetics

This Saturday, from 2:30-4:00pm GMT, I will be appearing on popular UK Christian Radio show Unbelievable, which seeks to foster discussion between Christians and non-Christians, to debate the topic “Is Apologetics a Waste of Time?” [Read more...]

Unbelievable – When Morality Becomes Literary Criticism

It’s not my normal practice to listen to Christian radio. Although I love music, there’s nothing more likely to induce me to vomit than Christian Pop interspersed with pious priests talking in that sickly, syrupy voice they have when dispersing their moral goodies like cherry-flavored cough-drops from the family doctor.

However, each Sunday I like to listen to Unbelievable?, a program on Premier Christian Radio. Recent programs have left me with one unambiguous message: it is supremely foolish to allow questions of morality to become exercises in literary criticism.
[Read more...]


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