About Acton Institute

The Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty is named after the great English historian, Lord John Acton (1834-1902). Inspired by his work on the relation between liberty and morality, the Acton Institute seeks to articulate a vision of society that is both free and virtuous, the end of which is human flourishing. To that end, the Institute engages in research, publishing, documentary film production, engagement with the media, and organizes seminars aimed at educating religious leaders, business executives, entrepreneurs, university professors, and academic researchers. Acton promotes sound economic thinking and an awareness of the moral underpinnings necessary for a free society.

Do you need resources? Of course you do

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Resources for understanding God and influencing culture. [Read more...]

Does the moral consensus on human trafficking apply to economics?

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If the church is against slavery, it must be for freedom. [Read more...]

Everything really is awesome

President Business: "All I'm asking for is total perfection."

A key step in coming to understand our calling to creative service is to realize that everything really is awesome, not in the trite sense that it is simply cool or nice, but rather that the entire created order is awe-inspiring in its scale and scope. It is awesome in its complexity. It is awesome in its diversity. It is awesome in its expression of God’s grace. [Read more...]

A Chicago chicken shop’s statement of faith

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Businesses are culture-making enterprises, whether they or we like it or not. When we detest or disagree with particular cultural outputs of particular cultural enterprises, we should respond with healthy Christian output, not systemic strong-arming and stifling. [Read more...]

A great reversal of the church and the welfare state

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“The common good binds church and state together. What greater contribution, now, to the common good than setting the welfare system back on its feet? Try it, and see.” [Read more...]

Ayn Rand Didn’t Understand Capitalism. Or Altruism. Or Christianity. Or Reality.

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Rand had an almost complete misunderstanding of capitalism. She confused self-interest with selfishness. [Read more...]

The tragedy of Detroit

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“Detroit developed best when it was bottom-up,” says Harry Veryser, economist and professor at University of Detroit Mercy. “When small communities, small parishes, small schools were formed… that’s when Detroit prospered.” [Read more...]


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