Economy “slips” into a “sweet spot?”

How do you like that. It was an accident. The economy has slipped into a sweet spot.

If you say it like that, you don’t have to give anyone credit, do you?

Another beaut from our unbiased media.

The economy has slipped into a sweet spot of steady growth and low inflation, a seemingly perfect soft landing after a long housing boom, energy price shocks and devastating natural disasters.

Economic growth looks set for a strong rebound in the first quarter after a very weak fourth quarter, with business spending the driver of growth, as consumer spending growth slows, and the housing market cools.

Job growth has also been solid, with unemployment near a 4-1/2 year low at 4.8 percent, but pay raises are still too small to have ignited real worries about wage inflation.

“If you take a snapshot of the economy right now, you could certainly say that we’re in a sweet spot,” said Bernard Baumohl, executive director of The Economic Outlook Group in Princeton Junction, New Jersey.

“The economy is growing nicely, we don’t have any major inflation problems, the Federal Reserve is moving only gradually to raise interest rates. Everything seems to be working well,” he said.

If you’re waiting for the “but” which follows any good news which is allowed to be printed – it’s the very next word.

Related: “Rich Republicans” and Democrats
the 800,000 jobs that didn’t go missing…
Times admits good economic news

WELCOME: Dr. Sanity readers! While you’re here, please look around. Today we’re also discussing Sanctuary for Abdul Rahman, the harm we do to ourselves when we refuse to acknowledge our lesser selves, and some music that’s so good it made me lose my comportment! :-)

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  • ForNow

    The economy has “SLIPPED” (ooh what a word choice) — it happened accidentally you see, in spite of W & co., they dropped the ball somehow thank goodness, get it? –”into SWEET SPOT” — just a SPOT, you know so you have to ask “BUT CAN IT LAST?” and hence the article’s title

    Economy in a sweet spot, but can it last?

    Oh Andrea Hopkins you have a cinnammon way with words and a secure job in the MSM.

  • Joseph

    Actually, we are all doing very well indeed. There are now 793 billionaires worldwide. This is up a whopping 102 from last year and up an incredible 140 from 20 years ago.
    /
    Their combined worth is $2.6 trillion dollars or 18% more than last March [is it me or is that jsut about how much gasoline and home heating oil prices have jumped in the same interval?].
    /
    Over half of these new billionaires, of course, are abroad, 58 as opposed to 44 new ones in the United States. China now has four times as many billionaires as last year, and India has added an unbelievable 10 new billionaires to the list.
    /
    Happy Days Are Here Again!
    /
    /
    http://www.forbes.com/billionaires/global/2006/0327/029.html

  • TheAnchoress

    Funny, no one minded all those millionaires and billionaires being created during the irrationally exuberant tech bubble of the 1990′s.

    Resentment of the rich is cyclical, apparently. And it has to do with what letter follows the president’s name.

  • Sigmund Carl and Alfred

    Actually, I dont mind such idiocy.

    It only goes to prove and endorse the idea that partisanship is deeply embedded- so deep in fact, that the Emperor’s clothes ae clearly visible.

  • ForNow

    Oh gee I hate it when non-Americans become billionaires, especially when an internazionalistische sozialistischer agitpropbot thinks that I should.

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  • Joseph

    OK, Anchoress, let’s get together and put two and two together:
    /
    pay raises are still too small to have ignited real worries about wage inflation
    /
    Forty-four new billionaires have been created in the United States.
    /
    Guess where all the money generated by the fine economy is going?
    /
    Since 1980, the good times have been very good indeed for anybody with enough surplus income to invest in common stocks–generally those with incomes of about $50,000 a year or above.
    /
    They haven’t been particularly good for anyone else. In fact, average real wages, as opposed to stock profits, have declined slightly, while energy prices have sharply risen. Energy costs are largely fixed and, the less your income, the larger the percentage of it you must spend on them.
    /
    And the bad times have been dreadful for someone whose income is below, say, $25,000 and, therefore, marginal and disposable labor.
    /
    We are simply becoming two societies, one well off, generally due to stock speculation, either now or over the long haul in things like 401K’s; the other scraping by with little or no chance to do much better except by working themselves into an early grave with punishing overtime, when it is available, and, quite often, being dumped uncermoniously into unemployment when it is not.
    /
    For anybody younger than 35 this is not a serious problem. They have never really known anything different. I have known something different. I have known an America where everybody had a chance to better themselves, no matter what their income level, and wealth did not steadily concentrate in fewer and fewer hands though stock speculation.
    /
    That America really did exist. It does not exist now.

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