Something fluish…

I don’t know why we must have a sign of peace during Mass, but I knew that guy sneezing and coughing around me was trouble…

Blogging light. No emailing, sorry. Hopefully better soon!

About Elizabeth Scalia
  • http://runswithangels.wordpress.com/ Scorned Cheerleader

    So I have heard. Although I’m not sure we should start that up again. Folks probably already think that we should get a room. XXOO

    All I did was ask an innocent question, sir!

    Wait, you’re not suggesting . . . never mind. Just never mind. Forget that I even mentioned it..

    I’m not the one making suggestions here, buddy. ;)

    …for anyone here who might be interested or have their mind in the gutter,

    I wasn’t referring to you; that was for the benefit of anyone who wasn’t aware of The Mutual Admiration Society between some of us – me being a newbie here and all.

    So, are we straight on that? Huh?

    Hey, Flexo, tell us some tales…hahaha!

    Oh, before I forget – this flu season is unusual in some respects – largely that it has hit much earlier than normal and that H1N1 is affecting children at a higher rate than usual, again, for this time of year. In any case, we are up against two strains of influenza this winter.

  • cathyf

    Our diocese has suspended the cup, communion on the tongue, holding hands at communion and touching at the sign of peace as well. The latter three are perfectly sensible, but suspending communion under the species of wine but not bread is totally the wrong way around. The wine has alcohol in it. Remember in the old days, before digital thermometers, when you would go to the doctor’s office, and they would sterilize the glass mercury thermometers by putting them in the cup of alcohol? And everybody was sick who was using the thermometer! The whole point of drinking alcoholic drinks is that the alcohol kills the germs — before the last 100 years or so, the only safe way to drink was beer, wine or broth.

    No, the real germ-passing opportunity is distributing the hosts. The minister touches your germy hand (or mouth) and then touches the hands (or mouths) of everyone in line behind you. That’s the ideal efficient germ-sharing procedure!

  • cathyf

    The handshake of peace is the most annoying part of the Novus Ordo.

    Wow! They used the Novus Ordo in the 4th century?!?

    The deacon then calls out “Receive one another and let us kiss one another.” You must not suppose that this is the usual kind of kiss which ordinary friends exchange when they meet in the street. This kiss is different.By it souls are united with one another and receive a pledge of the mutual forgiveness of all wrong. So then, the kiss is a sign of the union of souls and of the expulsion of all remembrance of wrong. This is why Christ said: “If you are offering your gift at the altar, and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your offering on the altar, and go first and be reconciled with your brother, and then come and offer your gift” [Matt. 5:23-4]. So the kiss means reconciliation, and is therefore holy, as was declared by the blessed Paul, ‘Greet one another with a holy kiss’ [Rom. 16:16; 1 Cor. 16:20], and by Peter, “Greet one another with the kiss of love” [1 Pet. 5:14].

    (Cyril of Jerusalem, Fifth Address on the Mysteries approx. 347)

  • Flexo

    Hey, Flexo, tell us some tales…

    Well, because of Bender, I once got sent to a South American Turkish prison instead of him, on account of mistaken identity. That bastard! They treated me like an animal, and that’s what I became!

    Ha ha ha ha! Nah, I’m just kidding, he’s great!

  • http://dailywoof.wordpress.com Kensington

    A few months back I shared a pew with two unusually friendly strangers. When it was time to say the Lord’s Prayer, the man next to me extended his hand to me, and I pretended not to see it until he withdrew it, preferring to keep my hands folded over my heart.

    I still feel bad about that.

    As for the sign of peace, I’ve been souring on it in recent years for reasons I don’t entirely understand. For now, I offer a small wave and a smile, and if someone extends their hand to me, I take it lightly so as not to hurt them (because it’s usually an older person).

  • http://www.zazzle.com/shanasfo shanasfo

    Our family is nearly always ‘first in line’ because we take up the whole first pew. :-)

    The advantage to not following Catholic custom of leaving half of the pews from the front to the middle of the church empty is that you don’t have to worry about catching anyone’s germs but the pastor’s (and he uses hand sanitizer before he begins the hand washing).

    That also means that we are seldom pressed into hand shaking or hand holding since there is no one around us.

  • http://jscafenette.com Jeanette

    Hope you’re well soon, my friend.

    We shake hands in our church too (not Catholic), but maybe we should all get rubber gloves to protect ourselves. ;)

  • http://jscafenette.com Jeanette

    My aunt’s diocese suspended sharing the cup when swine flu was first mentioned last spring. They also get their host in their hands. I observed this at a funeral.

    My aunt is one of those who gives communion to shut-ins and assists the priest in giving out communion. I don’t know the correct term for what she is in that capacity, but I do know she told me all of this last spring.

  • Fuquay Steve

    Hey, I think I stumbled upon a new marketing strategy for the Episcopal Church – A Church for zenophobes (the only ones there are the few cradle to gravers) and claustrophobes – plenty of room in every pew. It’s tough to get germs at this church.

    How deep is the Tiber?

  • Karen

    I have to agree with AAJD that I don’t think God would allow anyone to get sick on His blood. If we really believe in the Real Presence, then does it matter what percent alcohol the wine is? It’s no longer wine when we drink it, REMEMBER?? Sorry, don’t mean to yell, but folks, think about what is really happening when we go to Communion: the greatest miracle on earth! Greater than any saint-associated miracles.

  • http://runswithangels.wordpress.com/ just ‘That One Girl’ again

    Karen – it’s not the Real Presence in the vessel that is the concern; it’s the vessel itself. To say that God wouldn’t allow anyone to get sick on his blood is an erroneous statement that just doesn’t quite fit here – you have two different thoughts going on.

    First, it is the human condition that makes the vessel dangerous to touch right now, for some. Just because the cup holds the Blood of Christ doesn’t mean that it is magically cleansed on the outside. Everyone who touches it leaves their imprint and germs on it. We all touch our mouths and noses and eyes, and those are the most common points of entry for germs.

    Another thought – if God wouldn’t allow someone to become ill from drinking His blood, then it probably wouldn’t be a problem for alcoholics to receive It. But it is a problem because the alcohol remains; the alcoholics that I am acquainted with refrain from receiving.

    True, the likelihood of ‘catching’ anything from the Precious Blood is slim to none, but the reality of picking up something from the cup is a fact!

    God bless and stay well.

  • http://vita-nostra-in-ecclesia.blogspot.com Bender

    Hey, Flexo, tell us some tales…

    Oh, so now you’ve taken to cheering for someone else?

    Well, I’m sorry I ain’t your loverboy Flexo, the guy you love so much. . . . You even love anyone pretending to be him!

  • http://fineoldfamly.blogspot.com Sally Thomas

    Not too deep to cross, Steve!

    Seriously, when we were Episcopalians, and my husband was a parish priest, his senior pastor instigated a not-really-necessary third service, on the theory that it would “grow” the church, because Episcopalians don’t like to sit too close together, and the 10:30 service was starting to get “crowded.”

    Some church-growth consultant had marketed that line, but it didn’t really work. Episcopalians may not like sitting next to each other, but they also don’t like switching to a different service time, just for the sake of having lots of elbow room. But the theory apparently is that emptier churches attract people.

    By the way, one of my oldest and dearest friends lives in a town in my fair state whose name begins with “Fuquay.” I wonder if I’m the only person here for whom that rang a bell . . .

  • Fuquay Steve

    Sally

    Thanks, is your fair state NC?

  • Bill Daugherty

    For Bender, cathyf and others regarding my remark that the sign of peace is an innovation: I’m an old curmudgeon, so I know the origin of the Sign and it is exactly as you cited – to make peace with your brother before going to the altar, to forgive one another as God for Christ’s sake has forgiven you, to correctly discern the body of Christ, etc. I pray that the Holy Spirit would make us all humble enough to seek and give forgiveness like that before the Lord enters the sanctuary in the fullness of His body, blood, soul and divinity. Holiness would sweep the Church like a prairie fire.

    But is that how you see it practiced in your parishes? I daresay not; it is more like the low church meet-and-greet you can encounter in any storefront charismatic song service. It contributes to what Father Neuhaus used to call “the chuch of wonderful, wonderful us.” Rather than unifying us, it has us breaking out into a free form preconsecration gabfest. It verges on defilement of the sanctuary.

    That’s the innovation – to make us more “relevant, tolerant and welcoming” – and it’s a crock. I will now withdraw to the rear of my cave.

  • http://runswithangels.wordpress.com/ just ‘That One Girl’ again

    Hey, Flexo, tell us some tales…

    Oh, so now you’ve taken to cheering for someone else?

    Well, I’m sorry I ain’t your loverboy Flexo, the guy you love so much. . . . You even love anyone pretending to be him!

    My God, what have I done?? :)

    Did I miss something? Huh? Did I miss something?

    [I don't know what I have missed, but is this getting out of hand? admin]

  • http://fineoldfamly.blogspot.com Sally Thomas

    Steve: It is indeed. I’m more to the west, however. I haven’t been to F-V yet, but my friend has always sung its praises as a lovely town, and I hope to get there to see her someday soon.

  • http://vita-nostra-in-ecclesia.blogspot.com Bender

    Did I miss something? Huh? Did I miss something?

    Oh, my dear Cheerleader, could it be that you are not a Futurama fan?

    That’s OK, you will always be in my heart.

    is this getting out of hand?

    Ha. Bender got out of hand ages ago. He is a precocious little scamp, after all.

  • Francesca

    Maybe we Protestants have a better way for communion . . . those tiny, separate plastic cups. They may be tacky, but we aren’t sharing germs. :)

  • http://runswithangels.wordpress.com/ Bender’s Cheerleader

    Sorry, Anchoress.

    All is right. Nothing is amiss.

  • http://bcscentral.info Gerry

    “That’s nonsense to me, and reflects a typical lack of confidence in God’s power in the sacraments–do we really believe He’s going to allow us to get sick on the very Medicine of Immortality?”

    Tell me again – I was there just a few weeks ago – what happened to the Great Stone Church at Mission San Juan Capistrano?

  • dymphna

    I dislike the handshake of peace because I don’t like touching strangers and it’s hypocritical. The same people who gave me the stink eye when I walked in now want to shake my hand? Ridiculous.

  • cathyf

    But is that how you see it practiced in your parishes? I daresay not; it is more like the low church meet-and-greet you can encounter in any storefront charismatic song service. It contributes to what Father Neuhaus used to call “the chuch of wonderful, wonderful us.” Rather than unifying us, it has us breaking out into a free form preconsecration gabfest.

    I’m not sure what you mean by that. In my parish, we stand in place and turn and extend a hand to each of those around us, saying a simple “peace” or “peace be with you” quietly. The speaking is not loud enough to travel around the church, and the only time you hear words is if some kid happens to be raising a ruckus, or those rare occasions when the priest forgets to turn off his mic. Up in the choir loft we are conscious of being even quieter, because of the acoustics of the church even low talking carries.

    That’s true at Sunday masses, and it’s probably even more true at the school masses. Our kids are quite respectful of the mass and of each other.

    But maybe rural midwesterners are different. People here are very welcoming and friendly, but in a decidedly quiet and understated way.

  • http://vita-nostra-in-ecclesia.blogspot.com Bender

    My aunt is one of those who gives communion to shut-ins and assists the priest in giving out communion. I don’t know the correct term for what she is in that capacity

    Jeanette — The correct term is the much maligned “Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion,” sometimes incorrectly referred to as a “Eucharistic Minister.”

    They are the exact same people who serve at Mass, but with some additional how-to training, as well as being instructed in a specific rite for receiving Holy Communion outside of Mass.

    If we did not have such EMHCs, as some insist that we should not, denouncing them as another of the evils of Vatican II and the “NO” Mass, then we would have quite a few people in the hospital and sick at home who would go without the healing Real Presence of our Lord.

    The priest(s) cannot be everywhere, and EMHCs are invaluable servants in bringing the bread of immortality to the sick and infirm.

    So, again, if you are ever sick at home for an extended period of time or in the hospital, do not hesitate to contact your parish or the parish assigned to that hospital and have someone bring the Lord to you.

  • Fuquay Steve

    Sally

    It is a lovely town this time of year but come August, you would think that Hell is the next town over.

    Steve

  • Bill Daugherty

    cathyf – Ours is pretty much as I described it with people leaving their pews to visit with other congregants across the aisle, etc. We have a new pastor who’s doing some good things in other parts of the liturgy, so perhaps this will be stopped soon also. Count your blessings – this isn’t the only parish where I have seen this kind of abuse.

    Bender – my own objection to Extraordinary Ministers is the extraordinary number of them employed at Holy Mass – 14 in my parish – for no better reason than to make communion go faster. I would certainly have no objection to a layman bringing me communion if I was sick or homebound. It would be a corporal work of mercy.

    Don’t know how long Anchoress will allow us to keep this up but I’ve enjoyed the opportunity learn what’s going on elsewhere (and to vent).

    Bill

  • cathyf

    The correct term is the much maligned “Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion,” sometimes incorrectly referred to as a “Eucharistic Minister.”

    Well, it depends upon the usage whether it is correct of incorrect. There are two kinds of “eucharistic ministers” — “ordinary ministers of the eucharist” (deacons, priests and bishops, who are ordained) and “extraordinary ministers of the eucharist” (anybody who is not ordained). The terms “ordinary” and “extraordinary” do not refer to common or uncommon, but to whether the minister is ordained or not ordained.

    So, in a sentence like “At Sunday 8am Mass we will have three eucharistic ministers, while at 10am Mass we will have four” the term “eucharistic minister” is perfectly sensible and correct usage. It tells the extraordinary ministers an important logistical fact: if it’s 10am and the priest and deacon are both there, then two extraordinary ministers need to go up, while if it is 8am, only one does.

    Where I live we understand how very lucky we are to have one priest resident in our parish. He covers our church, which has masses in two languages (he’s bilingual), another parish 15 miles away which does not have a resident priest, and the local college Newman Center. We have a one deacon, and the other parish also has a deacon.

    We have either 3 or 4 eucharistic ministers at a mass, and the ratio of ordinary to extraordinary shifts depending upon which Mass the deacon is at. On occasion, when our priest is ill, he says mass but does not distribute communion.

    Our priest typically says 5 masses a weekend (two Saturday evening, three Sunday morning). It is a constant struggle in our far-flung sparsely-populated diocese to keep our parishes staffed in any reasonable way, and we have people who come from neighboring counties and drive long distances. Many of our elderly who live in outlying towns can’t come to Sunday mass regularly. Given the logistical struggle to have Mass available to us at all, we would not even think about complaining about the ratio of ordained vs. not-ordained eucharistic ministers.

  • BevC

    Since graduating from Mrs. McGary’s kindergarten class in 1961, I don’t hold hands, shake hands nor do group hugs. When unable to attend the traditional Latin Mass, I simply shake my head when a pew mate at a kumbaya liturgy tries to grab my hand for the Our Father. I don’t feel bad about it. God made me a complex creature who prefers her space. I’m sure there were some of us around in the 4th century as well.


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