Boehner's Emotion; Rubio's Future – UPDATED

A few thoughts on last night:

Some were appalled to see John Boehner get emotional as the talked about the victory, and his background. I liked it. My blue-collar Democrat parents would have liked it, too. They knew about working crappy jobs. I know about it, too. I like knowing that the new Speaker of the House understands what it means to work a lousy job, or to come home from one job only to head out to a second one, because that’s what it takes to pay the bills when you have a house and baby and are rolling coin to afford a haircut.

Kind of ironic, isn’t it, to realize that the Speaker who understands what all of that is like is no longer from the Democrat party, but the GOP?

Marco Rubio: bright future in politics. Compelling story, charismatic, gifted, likable and deft. He is the future of the GOP.

Christine O’Donnell: bright future in daytime TV where I think she could do a very good job connecting with the soccer moms who help turn elections. Everyone has a role; I don’t really see hers in political office

The Evil Rove-Krauthammer Conspiracy: Whining that O’Donnell “could have won” if the GOP establishment had supported her would be a very convincing argument, had O’Donnell lost by 1-3%. She lost by 15%, against a very unlikable man which tells us that the problem was with her candidacy, and her inability to sell herself beyond her base, to the crucial centrists and indies.

The Perils of the Echo Chamber: This should be a warning to the Tea Partiers: don’t forget how disorienting things can be in the echo-chamber. Even if “everyone you know” in the forums you frequent thinks as you think, that still isn’t many people. A couple of thousand feels like a million when you’re in the echo chamber, and weak candidates are run, and races are lost, on such delusions.

California: That state makes no sense at all. Remember when the left wondered “why does Kansas vote against its own interests? Hello, Governor Brown.

Yes, it was a good night for the GOP, but the ability of Boxer, Murray, Reid, Frank and others to remain in office in a year of such discontent is a demonstration of how powerful the unions and entrenched interests remain. Which is why we need more Rubios, and fewer Palladinos, more Wests and fewer Whitmans.

Allen West: Yay!

Douthat: Well, Dems? Was it worth it? I’m not sure I find Ezra’s argument as compelling as Douthat does. “Legislative success” should have some relation to the actual representation of you know, the desires of the constituency. Otherwise it is not “legislative success.” It is arrogance and tyranny.

Pundits and Talking Heads: CNN was overcrowded, MSNBC was overbearing and FOX was, at times, terrifyingly well-groomed. It appears that TV Punditry is a distractingly lilly-white world, with Juan Williams and the gorgeous Donna Brazile (that woman does not age) getting some decent air-time, but there must be Hispanic, Asian-Indian and other folk out there whose opinions are worth airing on election nights. They were noticeably absent on the cable gasbag fests.

Wolf Blitzer: talking to America not exclusively in one-syllable words, but very nearly. Clearly thinks his audience is imbecilic. His low-point came in discussing Governor-elect Nikki Haley, who he took great pains to describe as “not American-Indian, but Indian as in India…” Oh, brother!

Media and Madness

The Future of Journalism from a guy who has been in the trenches a long time.

WSJ: The Four-Year Majority

More later – please check back for links!

UPDATE I:Pelosi: That ain’t astro-turf, lady!”

Barney Frank: These are not the speech or the demeanor of a winner. They are the rantings of a prince-ling who just made it out the window before the peasants came to hang him, and is missing his stockings and shoes.

Harry Reid: Awful, awful, awful. He is now Awesome McAwful, for me.

Dana Milbank: Terribly scandalized by Fox News’ obvious glee, but not by MSNBC’s equally obvious suffering.

The Tea Party: My point above, about Christine O’ Donnell, is not a criticism of the Tea Party; I think they did a good job, their first time out; they got Rubio, Nikki Haley–this are big wins–but I am disturbed by this notion that somehow “only” tea partiers can counter the Democrats or effectively govern. Real governance requires the ability to do more than steamroller the opposition, which is PRECISELY what the Democrats have done for the past two years, and its what got them into trouble. A conservative majority is going to have to be accept the fact that–as Ronald Reagan said–”you fight, you take 75% and then you come back later for the other 25%.” An inability to do that tempts tyranny, and if the base cannot understand it, they risk becoming as extreme as the far-lefters who are after Obama for not being “progressive enough.”

Ace: Bizarro word of the NY Times

UPDATE II:
Barak Obama: No, he doesn’t get it. His response to last night appears to be; “you just don’t know how great I am, because Bush was so bad.” Talk about echo-chambers. He is the most insulated president since Nixon.

Ed Morrissey: the GOP is on probation, and they know it. But it seems to me, the Tea Party is, too. If they demonstrate that they’re unable to see where and when to give in order to get, they will only be further confusing the country.

Michael Barone: Random Thoughts

Oh no! Some minority politician, like Rubio, are not “reeeeal”, or something!

Rocco: Boehner’s Catholicism makes history

UPDATE III:
Tim Dalrymple on the Mostly-Tea-Party Win

Joe Carter: There is no Tea Party Movement!

Powerline: Kind of thinking as I am re O’ Donnell

Brian Saint-Paul: Tea Party vs the GOP Establishment

About Elizabeth Scalia
  • Jennifer

    The perils of the echo chamber works both ways. The issue I have is that the Liberal echo chamber is the media. The goal now is to make sure they understand that we do not share the same morals just because their echo chamber is larger than mine.

    I have connected with people in the last two years that I would have never connected with but it for the urge to get our collective voices heard. If I gain nothing more than friends who do truly care for my well-being, instead of wishing for my demise, than so be it. It’s worth standing in the echo chamber.

    [I have never said the echo chamber is a bad thing...but one does need to poke one's head out of it from time to time, to get a sense of what others are thinking and how they are perceiving things. Otherwise, one ends up like Pauline Kael, who allegedly could not believe Richard Nixon won the presidency because "no one I know voted for him." And yes, you are correct, the left has its own echo-chamber, which is precisely why they were dismissive of the Tea Party when they ought not to have been. -admin]

  • Ella

    I found the adverse reactions to Boehner’s speech odd. Who knew you could get so much from mocking someone for being the product of a big family who had to struggle through tough times to get to where he is now? It’s especially weird to hear “gender is a construct” liberals complain that getting emotional during a speech is an unmanly thing to do.

    Re: O’Donnell, I’m not really sure I want to step into this quagmire, but here goes. I agree with you that she is more a pundit than a good candidate for office. But polling showed that she won over the independent vote and lost with the republicans. That seems to reflect a major disconnect between tea party interests and the Republicans that needs to be worked on.

    California’s problem seems to be that people flee its failing economy, leaving special interest voters there to continue voting themselves handouts. I guess they’re really going for “things get worse before they get better.”

  • Jeff

    Yesterday was the unofficial end of Obama’s presidency. Thank God.

  • Ellen

    I am so pleased that conservative Black candidates like Col. West are being elected. I wonder if the Congressional Black Caucus will let him join?

  • http://www.savkobabe.blogspot.com Gayle Miller

    Ellen – that WAS a rhetorical question, wasn’t it? You can answer it yourself by harkening back to the treatment given Condi Rice and Colin Powell by that selfsame CBC! it wasn’t pretty and Col. West wouldn’t hang out with those people anyway.

  • http://vita-nostra-in-ecclesia.blogspot.com Bender

    She lost by 15%, against a very unlikable man which tells us that the problem was with her candidacy, and her inability to sell herself beyond her base, to the crucial centrists and indies.

    So, why did the smart and competent and “good” candidates like Fiorina and Whitman and Bob Ehrlich and Dino Rossi — all very sellable to centrists and indies — why did they all lose (or look likely to lose)? They all lost even without the fatally crippling baggage of getting the Bork-Thomas-Palin treatment.

    The fact is that there are places in this world where the people are all too content to vote for the worst and most incompetent and most corrupt people in the world — just go to practically every big city. Delaware, in fact, has a history of voting for one of the biggest boobs in the history of boobery — Joe BiteMe — so clearly there is something more than mere competence that voters there care about.

  • David S.

    Wolf’s use of small words doesn’t bother me as it did you; I don’t find it condescending in the context of widespread ignorance. (Google “Is Obama a Keynesian” for an example.)

  • OLD FAN

    “The Evil Rove-Krauthammer Conspiracy: Whining that O’Donnell “could have won” if the GOP establishment had supported her would be a very convincing argument, had O’Donnell lost by 1-3%. She lost by 15%, against a very unlikable man which tells us that the problem was with her candidacy, and her inability to sell herself beyond her base, to the crucial centrists and indies.”

    Indeed, well stated Anchoress. It reflects the current fashion with many Pundits who claim to be on the right side of history. I see many playing the FASHION game – Even today, with regret (as a diddohead from 93), to hear Rush Limbaugh double down on the fashion. It isn’t Conservative, which is based on facts, reality, reason, objectivity, honesty, etc.

    Rush is so much better than this. Remember when out of frustration, he declared he “won’t carry the water for anyone anymore”? Well he is now, carrying the O’Donnell water, as well as the Palin Franchise, as much as he can.

    Rush actually sounded like he was debasing Karl Rove, which is truly not wise. It is the last thing we need. Rush has the talent to grow a sound team, not debase and divide. WE have seen some really delusional egos wage war on numerous fronts, only to destroy all, especially themselves. Rush will never lose his listening audience, but I have never seen him so lost in the fashion.

    For example, the mighty Limbaugh claimed “it is what it is”, Fiorina and Whitman lost because they are moderates! Sure, as he associated them both with the McCain loss of 2008. Could he really believe we are unaware that Sarah Palin, the choice Celebrity Icon he uses to advertise he is super hip to the fashion, was not the VP Nominee who embraced the Maverick Platform? That Mrs. Palin had not genuinely played a much bigger role than Fiorina or Whitman, in that dramatic, embarrassing loss in 2008? Does he not know, Sarah Palin was the Co-Partner of the Maverick Ticket, which was pushing Cap and Trade Taxation?

    Rush also strangely rebuked those politely expressing the desire to ‘get things done’, to ‘work together’, to compromise, etc. Did he not realize this is typically known as good politics? Simply expressing a positive desire, to express – even pretend one wants to offer a constructive, healthy exchange to improve all? That is common political fluff, which is essential and expected for any politician. Obama, Pelosi, Reid, Clinton, suffered politically for their strident, ugly partisan demeanor. Why follow that folly?
    On top of all that, does the fine Man behind the Golden Mic, realize Sarah Palin expressed the same reach out rhetoric last night on Fox? Is it just okay for her to say it, and no others?

    We have watched the fashion grow so delusional over the years after 9-11. Many foolishly enabled the very worst after 2004, following a very self destructive reactionary mindset. So many have lost credibility playing the games. Even some of the best of us, grew hyperbolic, unwittingly undermining some of Our finest interests in Washington. Enabling Nancy and Harry to take control of the Congress was a huge mistake, which only encouraged the worst in 2008.

    But the recent elections have shown us, this fashion is still weakening and enabling the opposite in many ways. Mr. Levin even lost so much credibility, foolishly distorting the offerings of Mr. Mirengoff of Powerline, all for this very poor Candidate in Delaware. The reality is, Democrats actually successfully used the image of O’Donnell to portray an ugly stereotype to all of their opposition in the EAST, and perhaps it worked a little in other arenas in the Country. A poor Candidate can not only lose a Seat ripe for the picking, they can also weaken the Party effort.

    Perhaps the one who stated it best, Tigerhawk, wrote:
    “Like it or not, in today’s world public leaders of any sort — including high profile corporate executives, university presidents, the managers of NGOs, and of course candidates for office — require a measure of professionalism. The right would do well to groom and nominate their candidates even at the cost of some authenticity.”

    Some of the bigger losers in credibility, beyond those who were misguided enough to suggest O’Donnell could win in Delaware (did they ever visit Delaware?), are those today playing the denial game. The mighty EIB predictably can admit to nothing, and will play the game until the end. The rest of us, should learn to live in the real world – Conservatism is not fantasy. Ronald Reagan was a hero based on substance, not fashion.

  • Patrick

    Right-wingers in California have nobody to vote for, so the “D” wins by “D-fault”. Here I am: Catholic, pro-life, pro-traditional marriage, anti-war, anti-federal power, pro-guns, etc.

    And who do we get in the GOP? A couple of rich ladies who care a great deal about large corporate interests and little else – except that Fiorina cares a lot about starting more wars. Any honest right-winger will stay home or vote third party. “D” wins.

    The funny thing is that California’s Latino population is still fairly conservative: which means you’ll see a lot of right-leaning state initiatives pass – like the traditional marriage proposal last election. But you won’t soon see Republicans elected to statewide offices, given the nature of the state.

  • OLD FAN

    Bender, you really should read the entire Anchoress offering again, more carefully.

    Have you ever been to Delaware?

    See this for example…
    The Perils of the Echo Chamber: This should be a warning to the Tea Partiers: don’t forget how disorienting things can be in the echo-chamber. Even if “everyone you know” in the forums you frequent thinks as you think, that still isn’t many people. A couple of thousand feels like a million when you’re in the echo chamber, and weak candidates are run, and races are lost, on such delusions.

    Being politically blind, is contrary to Conservatism. Conservatism is not a fantasy, it is not denial, it is not wishful thinking, it is not fashionable hubris. It is the facts, plain and simple. Study the basis. Karl Rove is not the enemy, and is probably one of the brighter-capable political professionals around.

    The fashion is stunning at times, but one can only hope a return to serious Conservatism returns.

    [In fairness, I have added-to and shifted around some of my initial comments; Bender is a good and careful reader.

    My point is not a criticism of the Tea Party; I think they did a fairly good job, their first time out - they got Rubio, Nikki Haley--this are big wins--(and I should probably acknowledge that in my post). But I am disturbed by this notion that somehow "only" tea partiers can effectively counter the Democrats or effectively govern. Real governance requires the ability to do more than steamroller the opposition, which is PRECISELY what the Democrats did, and what got them into trouble. A conservative majority is going to have to be accept the fact that--as Ronald Reagan said--"you fight, you take 75% and then you come back later for the other 25%." An inability to do that tempts tyranny, and it makes the base sound a lot like the far-left who are after Obama for not being "progressive enough." That's MHO, anyway. -admin]

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  • silverpie

    Maybe Reid winning was for the best–he loses his seat, we have a good chance of getting Majority Leader Schumer…

  • Jeff

    Yes the only person more annoying than Reid would be Schumer. Small mercy.

    I wish I could appreciate how great Obama art. But I can’t.

  • http://vita-nostra-in-ecclesia.blogspot.com Bender

    Do not be fooled. They are trying it. Of course they are trying it. It’s one of the things they do best, deflection and misdirection. But do not be fooled.

    The message that voters sent last night is NOT, as the MSM and some others would have you believe, that voters reject the Tea Party candidates and that it was a mistake to run them and that they should never run again. The message, LOUD AND CLEAR, despite those who have sunk concrete in their ears, is that the voters overwhelmingly reject Obama and leftism. The lesson is not that some Tea Party candidates lost, but that Obama and the Dems were crushed and repudiated and rejected.

    ————–

    In addition, the lesson to be learned is not that, if you are someone like Christine O’Donnell, how dare you have the audacity to think that you should be able to run. The lesson is not that if you are someone like O’Donnell, you should just shut the hell up and stay home and not get involved you stupid loser. The lesson is not that if you dare to run you will be rightly savaged because you deserve it for your presumptuous to dare to run against your betters.

    No, the lesson to be learned is that we need MORE participation by everyday common people. The lesson to be learned is that it is the elitist-establishment jerks who say and think things like this who need to be crushed and destroyed. It’s a new day. Your time has past.

  • berrykeller

    I loved John Boehner’s speech. I also did not know about his background and when he was talking a voice in my head said, he has to be Catholic. I found it interesting my gut was right. P.S. I never got that impression when listening to Nancy Pelosi.

  • NavyMom

    We South Floridians are thrilled with Marco Rubio and Allen West!

    I, too, was deeply touched by Cong. Boehner’s emotional speech. It was real and raw and heartfelt. Who cares what the loser libs think, anyway?

  • Dad of Six

    The Tea Partys’ biggest and longest lasting contribution were the state houses, which are the farm teams for higher office. They kicked some serious butt yesterday. Some of these southern state houses had been Democrat since Reconstruction for goodness sake!

    If the Tea Partys have been the cause of some consternation with some of their candidates, what do you make of the RNC? I can see the RNC trying to help out looking for a candidate if none is available. But openly backing Charlie Crist and Lisa Murkowski, when they should butt out of the primaries?

    To those in states like MA, NY and CA, all I can tell you is to keep praying. We here in Michigan have been putting up with Jenny, Debbie, Carl, John and Dale for what seems like forever. Now maybe things will start moving in a more pro-life direction.

  • BEN

    Anchoress,

    I love your posts, always, and I certainly HOPE Rubio is the future of the GOP, or of a viable third way if not.

  • silverpie

    “The Tea Partys’ biggest and longest lasting contribution were the state houses, which are the farm teams for higher office.”

    Not to mention, in most states, the redistrict-ers for the next five Congresses!

  • Jeff

    If I hear Obama say “folks” one more time I may set myself on fire.

  • NanB

    “If I hear Obama say “folks” one more time I may set myself on fire.” I love Jeff’s comment and would like to add if I had five dollars for every time Obama said “folks” I could put a considerable sum down into paying off the national debt. I am so glad the Tea Party is making headway! I am disgusted with both the Democrats and Republicans.

  • SuzyQ

    Did y’all catch Jerry Brown’s acceptance speech? I’m pretty sure he was high.

  • http://lwolt.wordpress.com/ Larry Sheldon

    How would O’Donnell done, do think:

    If she had been a male?

    If the the Republican Party had supported the Republican candidate?

    The Republican party had not filed an FEC complaint against her?

    The Fairness Doctrine advocate cable station had run the program she had paid for?

  • c matt

    Real governance requires the ability to do more than steamroller the opposition, which is PRECISELY what the Democrats have done for the past two years, and its what got them into trouble.

    I think what got the Dems into trouble was their misinterpretation of the 2008 election. It was not an affirmation of the progressive liberal agenda that O represents (and hid pretty well during the campaign), but a repudiaton of the GOP not acting like the conservative government it claimed to be. If, in fact, the Dem’s interpretation had been correct, we would not have had last night’s shellacking, regardless of steamrolling.

  • Terrye

    I agree with everything you posted.

    One thing I would say however, I don’t think Rubio is really a product of the Tea Party movement. He had announced his candidacy long before we heard much about them and he had the support of a lot of establishment Republicans. I do think that he represents a lot of the same principles as the Tea Party movement. Serendipity.

  • Jeff

    To be fair to Obama, I think we can all look back now, putting all partisan bias and passion aside, and calmly acknowledge the Beer Summit as the most momentous event of his presidency.

    Great moments like that come across once, maybe twice, every century.

  • Nora

    In addition, the lesson to be learned is not that, if you are someone like Christine O’Donnell, how dare you have the audacity to think that you should be able to run…

    No, the lesson to be learned is that we need MORE participation by everyday common people.

    The lesson, actually, for the Christine O’Donnells of this world is that, yes, by all means run. But put on your big girl panties and know your stuff, because the power really does belong to the people — all the people, not just your facebook friends. The lesson for those “common people” who wish to run is that they shouldn’t count on the assumption that people want to be lead by a “common person”. And the final lesson for Ms. O’Donnell is that sometimes you can be just a little bit too common.

    This has nothing to do with “elites” (now at the head of my list of words/terms I never want to hear again, having bumped “locally sourced” to the #2 spot). This has to do with being a mature, politically aware candidate, no matter where you came from.

    As for the California results, all I can say after a year of living in San Francisco (a city I genuinely love, btw, in spite of the political wackiness) is that the results were no real surprise. The ballot measure results are really more telling, IMO, than the big contests, and they went pretty well.

  • scott

    Have you forgotten that the early policies of George Bush, politically formulated by Karl Rove, are what got us to the ruling liberal gestapo in the first place?

    Sure, now is the time to support more moderate candidates that will again appease, retreat, betray and for what?

    If I’m going down it’s going to be in a blaze of glory, not a whimper.

    Revelation 3:16

  • Greta

    Couple points. in 2012, look at the senators up for election. Keep in mind that the democrats have slim margin and a leader in Reid who has huge negatives. Then look at the list below and think of who is going to continue to fall on the sword for the party if the house passes repeal of healthcare or anything else with large popular support. I think if pushed by the dems, you might see some moving to become republicans very fast. Manchin in W Va is already committed to supporting the repeal of healthcare.

    In 2012, the number of Dem Senators running is very revealing.

    Finestein in California will be 79 and is talking of retiring

    Bill Nelson will be running in Florida facing those who just put Marco Rubio in power by large majority. Suspect he will think twice about supporting liberal democrat ideas

    Deb Stabanow in Michigan just saw huge switch toward the Republicans in her home state.

    Clair McCaskill in Missouri also will see the tea leaves

    Tester in Montana squeaked in and is very vulnerable in traditionally Red State

    Ben Nelson of the my vote for sale in healthcare will be up in Red State

    Bob Menendez in New Jersey will have to run with Gov Christie in a state which has gone a lot more Red

    Conrad in N Dakota has got to be concerned after being there for four terms. Some think he might retire

    Brown in Ohio was with Barry on every one of his liberal moves and Ohio just went big time Red

    Casey in Pennsylvania also saw his state go strong Red

    Webb, a former Republican who switched parties saw his state of Virginia go Red

    Cantwell in Washington is weaker than Patty Murry and she is in a tough battle and might not survive

    Kohl in Wisconsin saw his state go strong Red direction

    On The Republican side

    Scott Brown in Massachusetts has to run for that seat to keep it and this might be tough unless he shows strong move to stop spending

    Ensign in Nevada is weak after his miscues and will probably face a challenge in primary. He has to toe the line on spending and job creation.

    Hutchinson in Texas has retired and will not run in 2012 but this is Texas and this should stay Red.

    All other republicans running seem in safe seats.

  • Greta

    Now that there has been an election and the experience between republican party and tea party, look for both to try to work out candidates in advance to avoid some of the issues such as in Delaware, Nevada, or Alaska. If the tea party is smart, they will look for the advice of some seasoned veterans to help both in selection and in the campaign and look for the republicans to get OK early on for candidates to avoid losing to a later selected tea party candidate in the primary. Could prove to be a good marriage.

  • freelancer

    Regarding the DE O’Donnell senate race, the beginning and end of that discussion for me is that Christine O’Donnell won the primary. She had a right to expect that the Republican party would fully support her. If not, why was that primary held in the first place? One wonders. The damage done to her and her campaign by the self serving backbiting of Karl Rove and sore loser Castle after she had won could not be overcome in the short time left before Nov 2. I have huge respect for her and others who task themselves to campaign for elective office knowing that in addition to ordinary give and take with their opponent, they may well be publicly stripped bare by any number of other forces which have yet to find a bottom to the tactics of filth and/or general meaness.

    I think it is important to note that while the self appointed judges of the fitness of COD to be a senate candidate were dissecting her resume, the highly educated people running our govt were, among many other outrages, pillaging our national treasury. Give them a few more years and and they will all deserve another diploma for completely impoverishing this Republic and it’s citizens. God bless Christine O’Donnell and all of those tea party people, whatever their background, who are willing to step up and take on the responsibility of running for elective office.

  • http://mrnewyorkcity.blogspot.com Lifeofthemind

    Listening to Barney two thoughts occurred to me.
    1. His money quote, “the luxury of practical irrelevance” needs to be hung around the necks of Democrats.

    2. The unholy union of publicly supported academics and public employee unions, with the looming pressure of votes by currently illegal aliens, is an argument for a plan that I have.

    We need a new Amendment that does two things.

    1. Sets the apportionment of the Congress after each Census to the number of citizens qualified to vote in each State.

    2. Establishes that no one, except enlisted members of the military and officers called to extended active duty during time of war, who derives the majority of their income from funds controlled by either the Federal or State government for 12 of the 18 months preceding an election shall be ineligible to vote in said election for any office at the level from which they were a dependent on the public purse.

    I know that my plan will disenfranchise police and fire but that will only be at the State level for State and municipal employees and we have to take the government back from public employee unions. This will also reduce the corrupting influence of nominally independent contractors.

  • http://vita-nostra-in-ecclesia.blogspot.com Bender

    I’m with you, freelancer.

    In 2012, the number of Dem Senators running is very revealing

    In that list, I can easily see 6-7 Republican pick-ups.

    And, given that Jerry Brown is going to be governor again, with his economic philosophy, California is almost certain to crash even further. It quite possibly could be in bankruptcy by 2012. So, if the voters of California were not yet convinced of the bankruptcy of the Democratic Party, they might be convinced come 2012. The election of Brown quite possibly will be a nuclear bomb in their faces. So much so, that not only might they flip the Feinstein seat, but the state might even go Republican in the presidential election.

  • RT

    I’m a conservative, am thrilled with most results from last night, and like John Boehner. I didn’t care for him chocking up on camera like that. Yes, he has a good story, and I don’t doubt that he worked many hard and “lousy” jobs….but so have millions of others, many of whom are still there, with no reward at the end. Too many men cry in public these days. And if I may add – too many men hug instead of shake hands. Can’t we bring back the handshake? Now back to happy thoughts about Rubio, West, judges voted out in Iowa……

  • Sandy Amos

    I will take Speaker Boehner being emotional over a President that looks so cold and calculating when he speak to us. Do you think he wanted to breakdown in front of a national audience, I don’t think so, but he is human and wanted to acknowledge his past. Men being afraid of showing emotion hasn’t always worked out well. Just give me real!

  • expat

    Sandy,
    I don’t think Boehner was so much acknowledging his past as expessing gratitude for the country that allowed such an amazing journey. I read humility, gratitude, and love in his choking up.

  • Carl Eppig

    California view from New Hamsphire. How can a state on the one hand elect “Moonbeam” to the governorship and then turn down legaizing pot? Very simple; the Hispanic vote. They got turned off by Brown’s opponent, but also want to protect their children.

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  • Walt Mateja, Ph.D.

    “In addition, the lesson to be learned is not that, if you are someone like Christine O’Donnell, how dare you have the audacity to think that you should be able to run. The lesson is not that if you are someone like O’Donnell, you should just shut the hell up and stay home and not get involved you stupid loser. ” from Bender.

    There were many hard Feelings with the R’s because O’Donnell beat Mike Castle in the primary… However, O’Donnell was the ONLY Republican who had the guts to run against Biden in 2008, before he left to be VP.

    Castle just jumped into the race after it seemed safe. And then with his panties in a wad, he refused to endorse or back her in any way. Not a classy loser.

    I know Christine and worked with her on Birthright’s Board, before she resigned to run for office.. She did a LOT of unpaid volunteer work for other NPO’s as well, BUT the local press was really biased against her, and it carried into the regional and national coverage from there.

    People always say they’re tired of the “politicians”, but just try to run for office if you’re not one!

    As far in “have you ever even to Dela..Where?, you actualy could be here and Not know it, I know because I live here.

  • Nora

    @CarlEppig

    Carl, I think it’s more than just the Hispanic vote. SFers are fed up to here with the vagrancy/homeless situation, which is why the sit/lie measure passed as well.

    That’s why, in spite of Brown/Boxer wins, I think people are finally getting it — the homeless situation is a direct result of the mind-so-open-your-brain-fell-out attitudes around here, and it’s a situation that directly impacts every San Franciscan every hour of every day of the year.

    The homeless population now includes growing numbers of young, drug-addicted, aggressive and often violent people. We’ve had a few ugly incidents recently, including a few dog maulings (one fatal) by some of the dogs these vagrants keep and breed (!). And when I say “dog”, I pretty much mean “untrained, underfed pitbull”. One homeless guy around here openly walks his on a length of motorcycle chain (a practiced adopted by people who breed pitbulls for fighting purposes). They also invade every park and public-use space in the city to the point where working, tax-paying residents can’t use them.

    Add to that monumental quality-of-life issue the disgusting behavior exhibited at street fairs and other public events (B2B, i.e.), and people are seriously fed up. Blatant marijuana use in public, blatant sexual activity in public, public nudity, urinating and defecating on private and public property — it’s revolting — and I’m not even talking about the homeless — ING dropped its sponsorship of the B2B this year because of the behavior of the participants in the Panhandle, not the vagrants.

    You really only have to step in a pile of human feces left on your front steps once to get the liberal knocked out of ya — and for some people (the Haight), it’s an everyday occurance.

    There is hope yet, but change will quite literally be from the street up, not the other way around.

  • OLD FAN

    I agree Anchoress – sorry I missed your response until now. I think your initial instincts and writings were absolutely accurate.

    “But I am disturbed by this notion that somehow “only” tea partiers can effectively counter the Democrats or effectively govern. Real governance requires the ability to do more than steamroller the opposition, which is PRECISELY what the Democrats did, and what got them into trouble. A conservative majority is going to have to be accept the fact that–as Ronald Reagan said–”you fight, you take 75% and then you come back later for the other 25%.” An inability to do that tempts tyranny, and it makes the base sound a lot like the far-left who are after Obama for not being “progressive enough.” That’s MHO, anyway”

    I agree completely.

    I imagine Bender is a good reader as well, and I apologize for being firm – blunt.

    But the fashion is simply tiresome. I do know that much of this fashionable expression is unfairly hostile to so many. We watched the nonsense grow with the fine President Bush – and sounder heads should have been more vocal in calling for sanity.

    The ‘purist’ Identity Movement is always a weakening effort. One simply cannot close doors to reality.

    Conservatives based much of their philosophy on the imperfections of human beings, and some seem to have lost this objectivity which created this strong political conviction. It is why Conservatives oppose a monopoly of Government, understanding the few can never have too much power over the many – for they are bound to make mistakes – grow corrupt – etc. But it never has been so vitriolic, this fashionable offering, which is actually debasing Our own interests. There are many juvenile concepts amongst us, and we simply cannot enable them anymore, seeing constructive positives getting debased time and again with juvenile sophistry.

    But I think my opinion stems from seeing the differences in the honest public display effort – the Tea Party Protests vs. the various groups who adopted the TEA PARTY image to push their agenda

    For example, I have to disagree with the extent the TEA PARTY EXPRESS did well in their first try. Their ugly offering in a number of Primaries only grew opposition – and I remember the ugly personal emails advocating for Miller in Alaska, or for O’Donnell in Delaware, etc. I even emailed some, warning about the lack of constructive offering, believing this to be terribly bad politics. We were only inviting some flops, and INDY runs like Ms. Murkowski. After the way she was treated, even having a 70% ACU rating, I don’t blame her running on her own.

    I know most of the original protesters, which I took part in, were predominantly Republicans organizing TEA Party Protests against the disastrous Democratic Party offering. I know many took over a fine, genuine grass roots movement, some with good intent, some who are really quite extreme, some just eager to further themselves. Many so-called libertarians for example, have used the movement to unfairly debase the Republicans. It is quite interesting.

    However, in terms of these Midterms – the Republicans were going to do very well, and may have even done better without the likes of the TEA PARTY EXPRESS. And part of this is not as some say, merely a rebuke of the Democratic Party. Americans do not see things in a vacuum, and many remember the Republicans in a far better light than what they see today via the Democratic Party. GW Bush’s class and strong response to 9-11 are a prime example.

    I believe Rubio, and a few others, even without the TEA PARTY EXPRESS, would have been nominated in Primary regardless. And many Republicans would have done just as well without the TEA Party Express, which is largely responsible for empowering some very poor selections in the Primaries. The TEA PARTY EXPRESS and their candidates, like O’Donnell, were actually used by Democrats to exploit an ugly stereotype, attempting to sink all of the Republicans as the same. It seems to have been successful in many arenas.

    The Tea Party Protests are a form of positive fashion. It is healthy to see (finally) Conservatives get off their duff, and gather together to make an organized Public Display. Too many for so many years, ceded to the very loud misguided voices of the Democratic Partisans.

    But, let’s pretend Mr. Rubio was the ONLY Republican Candidate in that Senate Race. I sense the Tea Party Express may have wanted to challenge him with their own offering, believing he is not conservative enough – having been a Republican for so many years. They are stuck on the overt anti-GOP, conspiracy-cabal sophistry, which is clouding some of their efforts. Crist was worthy to oppose, but one has to question their judgment on a number of efforts.

    We must get better. I am certain the TEA PARTY EXPRESS will get better. We cannot afford to enable the likes of Harry Reid, who should have been defeated. We have watched fashion before, and it can weaken all.

  • Elaine S.

    “And, given that Jerry Brown is going to be governor again, with his economic philosophy, California is almost certain to crash even further. It quite possibly could be in bankruptcy by 2012. So, if the voters of California were not yet convinced of the bankruptcy of the Democratic Party, they might be convinced come 2012. The election of Brown quite possibly will be a nuclear bomb in their faces.”

    Replace “Jerry Brown” with “Pat Quinn” and “California” with “Illinois” and you pretty well sum it up for my state too.

    Quinn has been incredibly weak and wishy washy, has been pushing for a tax increase for months, seriously bungled his campaign and was behind in nearly all polls prior to the election… but he managed to just barely win by a fraction of a point.

    Yet the political junkies here are already insisting that Bill Brady (GOP) candidate lost because he was “too conservative” for suburban voters, and that his loss “proves once and for all” that only “moderates” or liberals can hope to win statewide office here.

    Well, I predict (you heard it here first) that they will be proven WRONG, big time, in the next 2-4 years.

  • Cbalducc

    If Christine O’ Donnell was such a weak candidate, why did Mike Castle lose the Delaware primary? God bless.


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