follow the labyrinth to the cross of glory…

… and other bat shit crazy none sense from Catholic “communities”.

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Source: Mr. Flavius.

About Katrina Fernandez

Mackerel Snapping Papist

  • Steven P. Cornett

    Got my Liturgical terrorism incident checklist ready……got a live one here!1). 70's warp era Hagan/Haas muzak … Check! (right off the bat with that one)2). Modernist theatre in the round that is indistinct from a performance center, a dance hall, or a bank…Check!3). Special double secret detention for inclusion of New-age neo-pagan labyrinth…Check, check!4). "Nothing but a table" altar … Check5). Special attention on the ambo … Check6). Jacuzzi baptismal font (useless for exorcism or crops, but reminds you of your baptism) … Check!7). Separated eucharistic "Chapel" … in the back? (normally two checks, but I'll give the benefit of the doubt there, so it's a one)… Check.8). Appalling, low-rent materials for the repose of the King of Kings. When you don't care enough…you send the very worst. CHECK!10). Porte Cochere … WHAT THE !!! (for the special people mayhaps? Wonder how that conforms to James 2:1-7?Let's see, nine checks, one big check and a finding…not good.

  • Anonymous

    I think I'm going to be sick….

  • Catholic art historian

    Actually, labyrinths have a long tradition of use in Catholic churches dating back at least as far as the middle ages, and can be found in many cathedrals in Europe. The labyrinth, becomes a physical reenactment of one's journey to God, and it often performed as a meditation or prayer.

  • Catholic art historian
  • Steven P. Cornett

    Re: Catholic Art Historian,You have the fact that it is in places like Chartes correct, but the rest of it you do not. The re-presentation of the passion and death of our Lord is the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, where he comes to us by becoming substantially the Body and Blood of Christ. The Labyrinth did not represent our "journey to God," for we cannot journey to Him, but rather His rescue of us from sin and death. The idea of it being our "journey" is actually a part of New Age thought, which has its basis in the pantheism that became popular because of the philosophical errors of Modern thought.In Medieval thought, the labyrinth was the Passion of our Lord as seen through the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. Within that viewpoint, Christ is identified with the Legendary Athenian king, the Minotaur is a type of the devil, and the youths rescued by Theseus are us. We are not to enter the Labyrinth on some journey; rather the labyrinth reminded the Medieval mind that we are already lost in the maze, and it is by following Christ and taking up our cross that we can escape.Here is a thread on Catholic Answers about the subject. The major takeaway point is that, while there is a safe spiritual viewpoint with which to view Labyrinths, the way they are often encouraged to be used of late derives from paganism and would be superstition, which is condemned by the Church (ref CCC 2110-2111).Steven P. Cornett

  • Steven P. Cornett

    Another way of seeing the Labyrinth is to note its connotation in ancient times as a symbol of death, which draws us in without escape. On Holy Saturday, Christ descended to the dead in Sheol to rescue those that awaited Him from the clutches of Death.Again, we see that it is not a journey toward God but rather His Holy condescension to become man and His obedience until death, even death on a cross (PH 2:6-11) that we should see there. The reality of what is seen there, then, is re-presented to us in the words and actions of the Mass.If it should do anything healthy for us spiritually, it can only be by encouraging us to draw ourselves more fully into the reality of the Mass.

  • Steven P. Cornett

    Another way of seeing the Labyrinth is to note its connotation in ancient times as a symbol of death, which draws us in without escape. On Holy Saturday, Christ descended to the dead in Sheol to rescue those that awaited Him from the clutches of Death.Again, we see that it is not a journey toward God but rather His Holy condescension to become man and His obedience until death, even death on a cross (PH 2:6-11) that we should see there. The reality of what is seen there, then, is re-presented to us in the words and actions of the Mass.If it should do anything healthy for us spiritually, it can only be by encouraging us to draw ourselves more fully into the reality of the Mass.

  • http://chiralcapers.wordpress.com/ chiralcapers

    This video is heartbreaking.Anthony OPL

  • Mark G.

    Their baptismal font look like it has a slide!Well, on the bright side, they have a proper corpus of our Lord on the "Cross of Glory." I have to envy that – our parish has a Risifix. Also, they also have Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, which is wonderful.But still…

  • rosamundi

    I'm sure it was just the camera angle, but the shot of the top pool in the Baptismal font made it look like there was something icky growing in it, like pond weed or algae.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04053407632823479165 Warren

    #19. The hurling of the vomit?W

  • Catholic art historian

    Steven,Thanks for that additional information and clarification on the history of the labyrinth. One other thing to mention though, is that the labyrinth was also used in medieval times as a substitute for a pilgrimage when one could not actually make the pilgrimage to Rome or Jerusalem or Santiago de Compostela. Certainly there is a place for legitimate use of a labyrinth in Catholic thought, but, as you rightly point out, in can become a slippery slope to incorrect thinking.

  • Steven P. Cornett

    Re: Catholic Art Historian,I'm not sure how accurate the idea of it as a substitute for pilgrimage is, though it is stated as such on Wikipedia, and we know how accurate that is. There is a reason for Steve Colbert's development of the term "Wikiality."OTOH, the one devotion we know for a certainty is meant as a substitute for a very specific pilgrimage is the Stations of the Cross. That was intended to focus on the Passion of Christ in the way one would on the VIa Dolorosa in Jerusalem, and was brought to the Churches of Europe by the Franciscans who were granted administration of Christian holy places in Jerusalem in 1342 (which they've held to this day).In any case, any claims about the purpose of Labyrinths or their relation to pilgrimages and the specific ones should point to a respectable Church history, and if possible to primary sources. As I said, a lot of those that promote the wrongful uses of Labyrinths make a lot of spurious claims that our media trumpets with neither reflection or thought. There are, sadly, a lot of people who think that when it comes to the Church, they are permitted to make a lot of stuff up.Steven P. Cornettcornetts@wcoil.com

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15095161921742904453 Paul

    It's certainly not the kind of Church I would design. Yes, it's overly modern and missing many traditional Catholic elements that are worthy.But, I think we need to take a step back and pause before being so critical of any place where the sacraments are celebrated."Bat shit crazy nonsense"? That's not how we should talk about our fellow Catholics — even when we disagree with them.You may have noticed that, in one of the shots from the clip, the people there are participating in Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. You may not like the "reservation chapel" where that adoration is taking place — but the Church teaches that it is the same real presence of Christ in that monstrance as would be in a very traditional-looking Church.There was a better way to do this post and make your point.

  • Steven P. Cornett

    Re: Paul,You may have noticed that, in one of the shots from the clip, the people there are participating in Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. You may not like the "reservation chapel" where that adoration is taking place — but the Church teaches that it is the same real presence of Christ in that monstrance as would be in a very traditional-looking Church.I do not disagree in any way on your last sentence, but let's look at the rest of it. First off, how often do you think such adoration is? Maybe often, and if so they do well, but I would have to think not.However, it is because it is the same Real Presence, indeed the same Lord and Savior present in all His churches when He is present in the Holy Eucharist that I have trouble with "reservation chapels." Often they are put in the back of the churches, or in a side room outside of the Nave of the Church entirely, something that is all too common in the Archdiocese I live in. What results is that the Lord's Real Presence is diminished in the minds of the faithful because He is whisked in and out during communion. To too many Catholics this leads to seeing communion as no more than a "Sacred Meal" (and there is much misformation on this topic in that direction too).It also leads to general apathy among the faithful in regards to the honor they should give our Eucharistic Lord. He is just as present in a modernist church that puts Him aside as in a traditional one that places Him at the Sanctuary or the altar itself, but in the former the faithful pass by and ignore Him. The coldness and indifference of his "faithful" in such "communities" is a great indignity to our Lord which he must endure every day.Instead of trying to downplay the offense and shrug it off, should we not pray in reparation for these offenses and begin to request that these errors be corrected?

  • Steven P. Cornett

    In other words, we must "rend our hearts, not our garments" over this. It is the Lord himself we have allowed to be overlooked this way, making the Real Presence really absent from all too many catholics.Or do we really want the condemnation of our Lord to be upon us for honoring Him with our lips when our hearts are far from Him?

  • http://brotherjuniper.wordpress.com Brother Juniper

    I hope somebody submits the Crucifix from the Paulist parish in downtown Boston at some point in time. That one is a screamer and I do mean literally.

  • Steven P. Cornett

    If by that you mean the Paulist Center in Boston, that is seriously ugly. And it is a screamer.Here is their video, if you dare.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17506171638613025839 Pauli

    That Crucifix is beautiful, I have to say. Agree on the rest, mostly.


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