The Subtle Idolatry (Guest Post: Ray Hollenbech)

Once there was a man who was very good at his chosen profession. Although he was young everyone recognized that he was a rising star within his organization. One day he took a business trip. Before he arrived at his destination he unexpectedly encountered his arch-enemy along the road, and that enemy left him on the roadside defeated–and somehow–totally blind.

This man was led by the hand toward his destination, a strange town where he knew practically no one, and was left alone in a room for three days. During those three days, in the darkness of his new-found condition, he had time to reconsider everything he had learned about his profession. He was a man of great learning, especially with respect to the “Bible” of his business. And oddly enough the “Bible” of his business was in fact, the Bible–at least the Old Testament.

The man’s name was Saul, and you can read this story in the Book of Acts, chapter 9. Saul had a passion for the Old Testament. Some Pauline scholars speculate that Saul had committed the entire Pentateuch to memory. Imagine: Saul had memorized every word of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy.

Despite such a passion for the Bible, when the author Himself came to earth Saul could not recognize that the One who inspired the Scripture was standing in front of him. How could someone who studied the Old Testament scriptures all their lives miss the Subject of those scriptures? I would like to suggest this answer: it’s easier to relate to a book than a living person. Books are manageable. Books can be memorized and mastered. Books can be analyzed and interpreted. Books can be used to support conclusions we have have already decided upon.

It’s too easy to criticize Pharisees like Saul. “How could they have failed to recognize Jesus?” we might ask. “Surely we would not have missed God’s anointed when he came.” Yet we should be careful, because these Pharisees, Sadducees, scribes, and lawyers possessed a commitment and dedication to the scripture that was likely far greater anything we practice in our day.

Perhaps the religious people of Jesus’ day were engaged in a kind of idolatry. Not in pagan practices or rituals but in a kind of idolatry which elevated the inspired word of God over God himself. The Bible is a precious gift from God. He breathed it into the minds and hearts of the men who wrote it. I believe that God Himself watched over process of collecting and canonizing these documents. I believe that God has protected the Bible through many dark ages so that every generation would be able to benefit from his gift. I love the book he has given us, but I do not confuse the book with the Author.

Sadly, in many Evangelical circles the Holy Trinity has morphed from “Father, Son, and Holy Spirit” to “Father, Son and Holy Bible.” Todd Hunter, a leader in the Vineyard Movement, says plainly that “the Bible is the menu, not the meal.” I believe he means that the Bible should help bring us to the Bread of Life, Jesus, and encourage us in a living relationship with a Lord who is still alive, still speaking, and still doing.

The same Holy Spirit who inspired the scriptures in the first century is still moving and working all over the world. Jesus pointed his followers to the ministry of the Holy Spirit when he said, “But the Counselor, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you all things and will remind you of everything I have said to you.” (John 14: 26) For each follower of Jesus there is a tension between learning about Jesus and having a relationship with him through the Holy Spirit.

So, how should we come to the Bible? I’d like to suggest three “nevers:

First, never come to the Bible alone. Always invite the same Spirit who inspired the Book to inspire your encounter. The Holy Spirit is the one who “will teach all things,” and He will use the Bible as part of His tutorial.Second, never settle for head-knowledge apart from personal experience.True, our first ideas about following Jesus may come from reading the Bible, but I believe we should ask the Holy Spirit to move us from the book to real-life experience. What starts as head-knowledge must find its way into our experience. Finally, never come to the Bible without a commitment to obey his voice. James, the brother of Jesus, tells us that if we build a lifestyle of merely hearing God’s word without doing it, we will become deceived. God doesn’t speak “FYI,” he speaks “FYO,” For Your Obedience.

The Bible is a gift–a gift we should treasure and respect. Let’s use that gift to grow closer to the Giver.

————————–

Thanks to Ray Hollenbach for this excellent contribution to the Pangea Blog.

  • http://ballymennoniteblogger.blogspot.com/ Robert Martin

    Good words… Thanks, Ray! Something we all need to remember.

  • http://cristoinvicto.wordpress.com/ Adam Gonnerman

    Excellent thoughts.

  • http://nailtothedoor.blogspot.com Dan Martin

    Amen, Ray! Your comments about bibliolatry and the need to engage with the Spirit when we approach the Bible, are both spot-on.

  • http://takingtheyoke.blogspot.com Ray Hollenbach

    Hi guys:

    Thanks to each of your for your encouragement. Here's hoping we can demonstrate to others a passion for God's written word because it comes from Him–and anything He gives us is, indeed, precious.