Iraq Veterans Against War (Video to Ponder)

This video is powerful, even if you disagree with this former soldier’s analysis of the Iraq war.  It was put together by Iraq Veterans Against War.

Watch the video below and tell me your thoughts from a Christian and Biblical perspective…

 

via Joey Aszterbaum

  • Megan

     If I don’t say I’m racist, I’m a liar. The same goes for every one. I appreciate that he led with that.

    We must fight the powers, not the persons, and call evil where it lies.

    • http://www.facebook.com/madhoneydew Paul Rodriguez

       not everyone is racist.  and there are degrees of quality (some seen and unseen).
      the most pressing thing is systematic inequality and unequal treatment that continues, sadly, to this day.  the matter of the individual subject’s racist expressions (i.e., whether they are hidden or more overt) comes second and also seems to hide the broad fact as expressed in the first sentence of this post. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/jeffrey.w.roop Jeffrey W Roop

     He spoke truth to power and if that is not prophetic, I’m not sure what is. My question is, where are the prophets in the church?

    • http://www.facebook.com/madhoneydew Paul Rodriguez

      if there is a universal priesthood among believers, then isn’t there also a universal prophet-hood ?  even that qur’an burning barbarian cracker.. right? 

  • Rana

     this is an excellent video. i agree with everything he says 100%. i was also born in Baghdad, Iraq yet my family is from Palestine. we know Occupation. believe me none of it is good.

    what scares me is that i see “National Security” or “Homeland Security” as the new gov’t cash cow for those in public office or formerly in public office who know how to milk the system, even Christians do this. 

  • Al

    I am saddened by the way that Romans 13 is used to justify all kinds of evil.

  • http://nailtothedoor.blogspot.com Dan Martin

    You can argue with his politics (I happen to agree for the most part), but you can’t argue with his experience.  One of the many tragedies of both Iraq wars is that we here at home have almost never had to confront the truth of the pain experienced either by “our troops” or “the enemy.”  It’s so much easier when fighting is all done by proxy…

    • http://www.facebook.com/doulos05 Jonathan Bennett

       True, yet he can’t argue with the experience of the dozens of other Iraqi war veterans I’ve spoken to with directly contradictory experiences. The fact is, ‘good’ is notoriously hard to quantify and measure over against the ‘bad’, which is equally hard to quantify. I can’t say that Iraq had 15 good ‘units’, but 30 bad ‘units’, therefore it was bad. I can only say, “Good came from this and bad came from this and somehow God is going to use all this to renew the world. How? I have no clue, but I figure he’s smarter than I am.”

  • http://www.facebook.com/doulos05 Jonathan Bennett

    From a Christian, Biblical perspective, the United States isn’t Christian (after all, North Dakota isn’t going to live forever with God after it dies). It is a republic which has stumbled into an empire (much like Rome). All of the social problems he mentioned, those are the issues the church can and must involve itself in. Healthcare, housing, hunger, financial crises, these are things the church can affect without engaging in politics at all (something there’s little evidence Jesus did, consider his response to their attempted entrapment with taxes, he basically said, “It’s Caesar’s money, give it to him. But your heart belongs to God, give that to him.”). 

    Foreign policy, on the other hand, is something that cannot be easily affected by the church (we aren’t the most powerful voting bloc, we aren’t even really united enough to be a voting bloc) and that, frankly, in the next decade will involve the US government doing lots of things that the church will find distasteful at best (expect agreements with Iran regardless of their human rights violations, separation from Israel, strengthening Turkey despite it’s persecution of the church, deals with Pakistan and a withdraw that leaves Afghanistan in chaos, which is basically the way we found it, and that’s just the obvious stuff). Not saying we shouldn’t vote and express our desire to our government, but too many Christians are giving to Caesar more than what is his due (their hearts as well), and doing so in the name of Christ too. I feel like our job is to be a passive moral influence within the empire (by calling those around us to join us in God’s kingdom) rather than a vocal opponent decrying it’s every move foreign and domestic (and scaring everyone away).

  • Ian

    To his the enemy is “the man” argument, “For though we walk in the flesh, we do not war according to the flesh. For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal but mighty in God for for pulling down strongholds, casting down arguments and every high thing that exalts itself against the knowledge of God, bringing every thought into captivity to the obedience of Christ, and being ready to punish all disobedience when your obedience is fulfilled.” 2 Corinthians 10:3-6. I’m guessing he’s not a christian tho.

    So i think that this scripture also gives voice to your guys’ opposition to the war. And I’m with you on that. It’s pretty simple “You shall not murder” Exodus 20:13. War was never God’s plan for the world. God desires for us to come together in unity, “Finally, all of you be of one mind, having compassion for one another; love as brothers, be tenderhearted, be courteous; not returning evil for evil or reviling for reviling, but on the contrary blessing, knowing that you were called to this, that you may inherit a blessing.” 1 Peter 3:8-9. 

    As for Romans 13:1-7? Look at the passage before, “Beloved do not avenge yourselves, but rather give place to wrath; for it is written, ‘Vengeance is Mine, I will repay,’ says the Lord. Therefore ‘If your enemy is hungry, feed him; If he is thirsty, give him a drink; For in so doing you will heap coals of fire on his head.’ Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.”

    I would also say that if you read Romans 13:1-7 carefully, it is talking more about police, not soldiers. 


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