Jesus the Celebrity?

My friend Mark Moore has lots of good things to say about following Jesus. Consider this excerpt an go and check out his full article & blog:

Suppose I answer my phone today and there is a woman’s voice on the other end of the line and she says, “Mark,” I am absolutely 100% positive that I will correctly recognize the voice if it is my wife calling. If, on the other hand, Tom Cruise calls me and simply says, “Mark,” I’m certain that I will say, “Who is calling?” Yes, I’ve seen Risky Business, Top Gun, Days of Thunder, all the Mission Impossibles, etc., but that doesn’t mean anything. I know my wife–I know about Tom Cruise.

I believe most Christians know about the celebrity Jesus. They’ve read a lot about him and they’ve seen a lot of his performances (from a distance), but they don’t know him as an intimate friend. They can tell you what major events occurred in his life and what things he’s said to others, but they don’t know him as one whose voice is recognizable whether it is loud and direct or soft and intimate. The result is that we often miss him when he calls. When the moment presents itself for us to respond to his voice, we are unsure whether or not it is actually him on the other end of the line…”Lord, surely that can’t really be you?!”

In order to know a celebrity and not just know about them, you have to be friends with them. Christians are in desperate need of rediscovering Jesus as a friend (John 15:15) and not a celebrity. READ FULL ARTICLE

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  • http://helapingsten.wordpress.com/ Micael Grenholm

    Amen! This is why I find it important for the church to seek the gift of prophecy even more, as 1 Cor 14:1 tells us. Then we will really see and hear the Lord, not just hear about Him.

    Blessings!

  • http://nailtothedoor.com/ Dan Martin

    While these are interesting thoughts, I am not entirely sure I agree. The celebrity/friend contrast is useful for thinking about commitment and intentionality, but it can also be misleading to people who, like me for many years, cannot find a way to reconcile the intimate “friendship” language with the silence and absence of personal connection we actually experience. To this latter group, I believe the common emphasis on personal relationship sets up a false expectation that, when not met, leads to needless beating up on oneself for not experiencing what everyone else does. The disciple should not be placed in the position of having to choose between faking a faith they do not experience, or living in the bitter disappointment of having been denied the blessing others claim.


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