The CBMW Website: An Essential Resource in a Gender-Confused Age

I want to encourage you to go to a new resource on the Internet: the CBMW Gender Blog. This site, which debuted just a little while ago, is already one of Technorati’s top-rated blogs. This blog, published by the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, provides excellent, pithy material on the matter of gender. If you have not already, bookmark this site, tell your friends about it, and check it regularly. Led by President Randy Stinson, a man known for his robustly scriptural home, and directed by a godly, gifted man named David Kotter, it is fun to read, passionate about biblical truth regarding gender, and destined to educate its regular readers on things that matter.

Gender (by which I mean sex) is a matter of great importance. If you do not presently think this, I would challenge you to rethink your understanding of this topic. Gender is the fundamental earthly reality of the human race. Whether you are a man or woman determines almost innumerable things about the way you live, though you may not even recognize this. What’s more, the Bible has a great deal of things to teach us about gender. The Bible is not a gender-blind book written to a sexless audience. There are many texts that apply equally to all people, but the Bible sketches from beginning to end a portrait of biblical manhood and biblical womanhood. There is of course no one book that touches exhaustively on this subject, but this is not the way the Bible constructs doctrine, is it? No, the biblical theology movement has taught us that doctrines and ideas are developed progressively through the Bible–there’s a bit given here, a bit given there, and by the end of it, we’ve got a textured, many-colored understanding of a certain doctrine composed of the work of varied authors writing in varied times. Do not commit the easy fallacy of thinking that the Bible does not have much to say about gender roles simply because there is no one extended section on the matter. To repeat, this is not the way the Bible teaches us about most any important matter. All our major doctrines–salvation, the person of God, the afterlife, to name just a few–are developed over many years and through the writing of many authors.

With this apology for a clear biblical theology of gender thus stated, it is also true as I have said above that gender is the fundamental earthly reality of our existence. God’s creation of Adam and Eve–each of a different gender–was not some divine afterthought in a creative jag. No, God was saying something to us when He created two people of distinct genders. He was saying that gender is hugely important, and He went on to show us that He gave distinct roles to men and women. All this to say that the CBMW website and blog reflects this reality and promises to educate a confused world–and, sadly, a confused church–about biblical manhood and womanhood.

Also, the Gender Blog is currently featuring a blog I wrote a few weeks ago on the “Goof on the Roof.” If you have not read this piece, I would encourage you to visit the site. Read the piece. Then, read other pieces. There is a ton of good stuff on this blog. Join with me in supporting this important resource in an age when biblical gender roles are debased, forgotten, or just plain ignored, whether by the man in the street or the Christian in the pew.

  • Dad

    One of our daughters wrote in her blog concerning a young man she is nanny to: On the bright side, the little H man and I took a walk down to look at all the big trucks. I believe if he could talk he would have told me that this was our best field trip ever. He was audibly excited and squirming in my arms trying to see more things. If I turned away from the trucks he would whip his head around to get them into his view again. Just for the record, I did not train him to care about trucks and such boyish things, but it seems to be inbreed in his little head that these are truly things of great joy. We plan to continue these field trips daily until the road is fixed.

    Needless to say I did warn her regarding the political uncorrectness of statement.

    Al (Not Owen’s dad or that other “Al”.)

  • Sue

    Owen,

    I liked your post on gender blog.

    However, I took a few minutes the other day to research the citations behind this post with a discussion of Kephale. I was not previously aware that the kephale study had such dubious status. These were my findings. I am trying to campaign for a higher commitment to academic scholarship on the blog so it could be a real resource, not just a popular site.


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