What Do Evangelical Professors Do, Anyway?

I have a suggestion for a fun question you could throw out at your annual Christmas party. “Professors,” you could say vaguely. “What is it they do, anyway?” You’ll likely get a bunch of answers, many of them expressing confusion. Some will voice skepticism–the professorate is an escape from real life. Thinking, after all, is [Read More...]

How Education Can Be (Profoundly) Evangelistic

How can Christian churches be an effective presence in a culture and society that seem increasingly hostile to them? It’s a tough question. It’s also one that every single pastor, elder board, and congregation needs to be asking. Here’s the reality: whether we’re aware of it, we are all “missional” now. If we would see [Read More...]

A University of Wisconsin Student Challenges “Diversity Training”

If you care about freedom of speech, and if you want universities and colleges to feature and even sponsor the free exchange of ideas, you should read this story. Here’s the tease from The Fix: Jason Morgan, a University of Wisconsin-Madison student earning his doctorate there, has told his supervisor he objects to the school’s [Read More...]

To Teach and To Love: Wright’s Law

Some stories in life make you want to live full-throttle for God’s glory. They affirm life, meaning, love, and the image of God. This is one of those stories. If you watch it, I think it will make you want to help others, and as a Christian, to spread the gospel and its goodness to [Read More...]

Breaking News: Writing Notes by Hand Is Good for You

The Wall Street Journal confirms one of my suspicions (and classroom practices!): writing notes by hand in class is good for you. Read this: Using advanced tools such as magnetic resonance imaging, researchers are finding that writing by hand is more than just a way to communicate. The practice helps with learning letters and shapes, can [Read More...]

The Quirky Strengths of Finnish Education

If you enjoy puzzling over what makes for effective education, this story from Smithsonian magazine, entitled “Why Are Finland’s Schools Successful?,” will strike your fancy.  As past stories referenced on this blog have shown, there is a major debate in America over what makes for good teaching.  Is it having bright minds teach children?  Small [Read More...]

Carl Henry’s Greatest Failure and Success

Found this in a poignant Christianity Today tribute to Henry written by his old friend Kenneth Kantzer.  Henry’s “greatest failure” according to Kantzer, former dean of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, involved a failed plan for a “great Christian university”: “From his student days, Carl dreamed of a great Christian university modeled after sixteenth-century Wittenberg or [Read More...]

Prestige and its Unimportance in the Christian Life

I’ve been reading the autobiography of theologian Carl F. H. Henry recently. It’s entitled Confessions of a Theologian and it is engrossing reading, particularly for those who enjoy study of twentieth-century Christianity. If you want an in-depth, personal look at this slice of history, you could do little better than to tackle this text. In [Read More...]

New Trends in Education That Really Aren’t New

Everything new is old again. So is the case in certain American schools, which are overturning sacred modern educational ideology by re-instituting special classes for below-average students. In “Holding Back Young Students: Is Program a Gift or a Stigma?“, Winnie Hu briefly reports on this trend and shows how it is igniting a firestorm among [Read More...]

The New York Times on My Alma Mater’s Food: And You Thought People Chose Bowdoin for the Academics

Actually, title of this blog aside, most people have no idea what Bowdoin College is, let alone why anyone would choose to go to this tiny school in Maine. But I, fair friends, am here to attempt to correct this cruel imbalance of perception by the ultimate stroke of modern agency: blogging. The reason I [Read More...]


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