What Do Evangelical Professors Do, Anyway?

I have a suggestion for a fun question you could throw out at your annual Christmas party. “Professors,” you could say vaguely. “What is it they do, anyway?” You’ll likely get a bunch of answers, many of them expressing confusion. Some will voice skepticism–the professorate is an escape from real life. Thinking, after all, is [Read More...]

The Quirky Strengths of Finnish Education

If you enjoy puzzling over what makes for effective education, this story from Smithsonian magazine, entitled “Why Are Finland’s Schools Successful?,” will strike your fancy.  As past stories referenced on this blog have shown, there is a major debate in America over what makes for good teaching.  Is it having bright minds teach children?  Small [Read More...]

“Learning to Be a Man”: Deodorant, Debating, and Same-Sex Classrooms

I found this NYT article by Jennifer Medina, “Schools Try Separating Boys from Girls”, interesting.  The following are some of the highlights from this article on same-sex education: Different Approaches to the Sexes: “Michael Napolitano speaks to his fifth-grade class in the Morrisania section of the Bronx like a basketball coach. “You — let me see [Read More...]

“So What?”: The Chronicle Review on The New Educational Epistemology

From the most recent edition of The Chronicle Review comes a compelling and must-read article by Tim Clydesdale, “Wake Up and Smell the New Epistemology,” about how today’s students approach education (not available online): “For decades, we professors and administrators drank deeply of notions like “knowledge for knowledge’s sake” and “the transformative power of the [Read More...]

New Trends in Education That Really Aren’t New

Everything new is old again. So is the case in certain American schools, which are overturning sacred modern educational ideology by re-instituting special classes for below-average students. In “Holding Back Young Students: Is Program a Gift or a Stigma?“, Winnie Hu briefly reports on this trend and shows how it is igniting a firestorm among [Read More...]

What Kids Are Reading Nowadays, and How it Relates to the Greatest Commandment

Ninth-12th Grade 1. “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Harper Lee2. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”3. “Of Mice and Men,” John Steinbeck4. “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”5. “A Child Called ‘It,’ ” Dave Pelzer –Source, Seattle Times This selection is part of a larger list that you can read at the link above. Here are [Read More...]

The New York Times on My Alma Mater’s Food: And You Thought People Chose Bowdoin for the Academics

Actually, title of this blog aside, most people have no idea what Bowdoin College is, let alone why anyone would choose to go to this tiny school in Maine. But I, fair friends, am here to attempt to correct this cruel imbalance of perception by the ultimate stroke of modern agency: blogging. The reason I [Read More...]

What We Know About Self-Control, and What This Means for Students Who Check Their Facebook Page in Class

A couple of neuroscientists published an article in the New York Times today on the biology and effect of willpower. The article, “Tighten Your Belt, Strengthen Your Mind”, by Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang, gives scientific verification to a principle your grandmother has been trying to teach you for years: self-control is good for you. [Read More...]

When a Lawsuit’s a Boy’s Only Hope: Billy Wolfe, Bullying, and the Results of a Peer-Based Culture

It’s not every day that you see a story about one boy being bullied without headlines accompanying headlines announcing a vicious death or a closeted homosexuality. Yesterday, though, the New York Times published just such a story. Dan Barry wrote the piece, entitled “A Boy the Bullies Love to Beat Up, Repeatedly”, as a sober, [Read More...]


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