Robby George and Greg Thornbury on Natural Law: A Valuable InSight Podcast

The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina has just released an excellent podcast on natural-law thinking featuring an interview conducted by Doug Baker with constitutional law scholar Robby George and systematician Greg Thornbury. It is called “Morality: Past its Prime”, and it will prove profitable to the listener. For those who are new to this [Read More...]

Making Men Moral: Closing Thoughts and Conference Audio

Well, the dust cloud is settling.  The Making Men Moral conference is over.  It has been an incredible privilege to do this event.  I am hugely impressed with Union University, David Dockery, Micah Watson, Robby George and the other theorists who contributed to this exceptional conference.  My brain is so full of content right now [Read More...]

Making Men Moral: Hadley Arkes on the Indissoluble Connection Between Law and Morality

The biography of Hadley Arkes, the conference’s final speaker: “Hadley Arkes has been a member of the Amherst College faculty since 1966. He was the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence, and was appointed, in 1987, as the Edward Ney Professor of American Institutions. He has written five books with Princeton University press: Bureaucracy, the [Read More...]

Making Men Moral: The Book Itself

As the conference concludes, I want to give you a brief sense of the book upon which this event is based.  Robby George’s Making Men Moral: Civil Liberties and Public Morality was published fifteen years ago by Oxford University Press.  It made quite a splash in its day, and it is a book worth considering and [Read More...]

Making Men Moral: Robby George’s Chapel Message, the Conference Keynote

The biography of the conference’s keynote speaker, Robby George, who spoke in Union’s chapel service: Professor George is a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics and formerly served as a presidential appointee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights. He was Judicial Fellow at the Supreme Court of the United States, where he [Read More...]

Making Men Moral: Greg Thornbury on the Enlightenment, Natural Law, and Christian Witness

The biography of the conference’s last session speaker, Greg Thornbury: “Gregory Alan Thornbury, PhD is the founding Dean of the School of Christian Studies at Union University, where he teaches philosophy and theology. Since 2002, He has served as Senior Fellow for The Kairos Journal (New York), an online research tool designed to help pastors [Read More...]

Making Men Moral: A Conversation with Robby George, David Novak, Jeal Belke Elshtain, and Harry Poe

In the evening panel session, a number of the conference’s speaker held a conversation about the topics covered in the conference. The conversation began with stories about Richard John Neuhaus. who was to have spoken at the conference and only very recently passed away.  Father Neuhaus helmed the influential magazine First Things and led the [Read More...]

Making Men Moral: Christopher Tollefsen on “Disability and Social Justice”

The biography of Christopher Tollefsen, the conference’s sixth speaker:   “Chris Tollefsen is an associate professor in the department of philosophy at the University of South Carolina, the director of the graduate program in philosophy. He received his doctorate from Emory University in 1995 and has taught at Princeton University, the Spiritan Institute of Philosophy [Read More...]

Making Men Moral: Jean Belke Elshtain on True Freedom

The biography of Jean Belke Elshtain, the conference’s fifth speaker: “Jean Elshtain is a political philosopher whose task has been to show the connections between our political and ethical convictions. She is the author of several books and scores of articles as well as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and [Read More...]

Making Men Moral: What Is Union University?

In the course of live-blogging this conference, I have thought a few times that it might be helpful to clue readers in a little further to Union University.  Some readers, particularly those located in the North, may not have heard much about this school.  Let me say, very quickly, that I cannot count myself an [Read More...]


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