Archbishop kicks Gray Lady

Maureen Dowd of the New York Times has long enjoyed flaunting her Catholic schoolgirl pedigree like a badge of honor.

Still, the Pulitzer Prize winner took her game to another level in a recent column attacking Rome for its investigation of religious orders that shelter sisters who oppose many of the church’s teachings.

Wait, is “investigation” the right word?

“The Vatican is now conducting two inquisitions into the ‘quality of life’ of American nuns, a dwindling group with an average age of about 70, hoping to herd them back into their old-fashioned habits and convents and curb any speck of modernity or independence,” she wrote.

Dowd rolled on. Reference to the fact Pope Benedict XVI was once a “conscripted member of the Hitler Youth”? Check. Reference to his Serengeti sunglasses and trademark red loafers? Check. Strategic silence on the fact that many traditionalist orders are growing, while liberal orders are shrinking? Check.

New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan fired back at Dowd and her editors, going much further than the low-key criticism that mainstream religious leaders usually crank out when they are mad at the press. His “Foul Ball!” essay was as subtle as a whack with a baseball bat.

Anti-Catholicism is alive and well, he argued. Check out the New York Times.

“It is not hyperbole to call prejudice against the Catholic Church a national pastime,” wrote Dolan. “Scholars such as Arthur Schlesinger Sr. referred to it as ‘the deepest bias in the history of the American people.’ … ‘The anti-Semitism of the left,’ is how Paul Viereck reads it, and Professor Philip Jenkins sub-titles his book on the topic ‘the last acceptable prejudice.’ ”

A clash between the conservative archbishop and the Gray Lady was probably inevitable. After all, the newspaper is currently led by an editor who — months after 9/11, when he was still a columnist — accused Rome of fighting on the wrong side of a global struggle between the “forces of tolerance and absolutism.”

Calling himself a “collapsed Catholic,” well “beyond lapsed,” Bill Keller said the liberal spirit of Vatican II died when it “ran smack-dab into the sexual revolution. Probably no institution run by a fraternity of aging celibates was going to reconcile easily with a movement that embraced the equality of women, abortion on demand and gay rights.”

The archbishop offered his “Foul Ball!” commentary to the Times editors, who declined to publish it. Dolan then posted the essay on his own website, while also offering it to FoxNews.com — which promptly ran it.

Dolan was, of course, livid about Dowd’s broadside, calling it an “intemperate,” “scurrilous … diatribe that rightly never would have passed muster with the editors had it so criticized an Islamic, Jewish or African-American religious issue.”

The archbishop also accused the newspaper of various sins of omission and commission, asking the editors if they were printing stronger attacks on the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church than on other groups — religious and secular — that have struggled with sexual abuse. The Times, he claimed, was guilty of “selective outrage.”

For example, he noted a recent report on child sexual abuse in Brooklyn’s Orthodox Jewish community that, after addressing the facts, “did not demand what it has called for incessantly when addressing the same kind of abuse by a tiny minority of priests: release of names of abusers, rollback of statute of limitations, external investigations, release of all records and total transparency.”

Dolan also accused the Times, and other media, of downplaying public reports in 2004 and 2007 that documented the problem of sexual abuse of minors by educators in U.S. public schools. It seems, he said, that major newspapers “only seem to have priests in their crosshairs.”

This prickly dialogue is sure to continue. After all, the 59-year-old Dolan was installed as New York’s 13th Catholic archbishop last April — so he isn’t going anywhere. And while America’s most powerful newspaper faces a stunning array of financial challenges, the New York Times is still the New York Times.

Stay tuned.

“The Catholic Church is not above criticism,” stressed Dolan. “We Catholics do a fair amount of it ourselves. We welcome and expect it. All we ask is that such critique be fair, rational and accurate, what we would expect for anybody. The suspicion and bias against the Church is a national pastime that should be ‘rained out’ for good.”

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About tmatt

Terry Mattingly directs the Washington Journalism Center at the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. He writes a weekly column for the Universal Syndicate.


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