Teaching as Self-Formation

I’m teaching a D.Min. cohort at my alma mater, Fuller Theological Seminary, starting a year from now.  In advance of that, I’m going to post occasionally for The Burner Blog at Fuller’s Lowell W. Berry Center for Lifelong Learning.  My first post is up,

In The Courage to Teach, Parker Palmer writes,

“The subjects we teach are as large and complex as life, so our knowledge of them is always flawed and partial.”

That’s especially true when the subject is Christian spirituality and the teacher is me.

In fact, though I feel woefully inadequate to teach the spirituality of our faith to others, there’s nothing I’d rather teach. And that’s because the very subject itself is going to force me to examine the patterns of spirituality in my own life, to read books that I’ve not yet read — and re-read books that I’ve not yet fully absorbed — and to dive more deeply into the life of the Spirit.

Go over to The Burner Blog to read the rest.

  • http://shayner.tumblr.com Steve Hayner

    I just finished leading an intensive here at Columbia Theological Seminary yesterday, and echo your feelings. That’s exactly right. Teaching is an outstanding way to learn, because we are constantly drawn and stretched beyond our current limits.

  • Gareth Higgins

    There’s an echo here of something I heard Richard Dreyfuss say once: all art is autobiographical.

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  • Dale Friesen

    Would it be possible to have your syllabus posted when it is completed?

  • Shannon Kelly

    I couldn’t agree more. I’m the Bishop’s Assistant for Christian Formation and I find out more about myself and my life with God each and every time I teach or do a workshop, or simply sit with other people who are also trying to figure it out. It’s a very humbling gift.

  • http://twitter.com/alexgamble Alex

    hey, i talked to mark driscoll today and he wanted me to tell you this:

    http://tinyurl.com/2d3ab89


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